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[Editor's Note: The Conversations is a monthly feature in which Jason Bellamy and Ed Howard discuss a wide range of cinematic subjects: critical analyses of films, filmmaker overviews, and more. Readers should expect to encounter spoilers. This conversation is the second half of a two-part discussion of Quentin Tarantino. This part discusses his latest film, Inglourious Basterds, while the first half was a career overview of his previous films.]

Inglourious Basterds

JASON BELLAMY: Well, Ed, after a few days off we're ready to move into decidedly fresh territory, because now Inglourious Basterds has entered the conversation, and it has done so with a bullet, or a baseball bat, or something. I have seen the film twice now and I'm ready to proclaim it the most thrilling picture of the year thus far (and, just so you know, that's a carefully chosen adjective). But what does that really mean? Pretty much nothing. So, with another tip of the cap to My Tarantino Problem, and Yours, the April 2007 give-and-take between Matt Zoller Seitz and Keith Uhlich, let's dive into the deep end once more.

At the end of Tarantino's World War II (revenge) fantasy, Brad Pitt's Aldo Raine looks straight into the camera and says: "I think this might just be my masterpiece." He's referring, of course, to a freshly carved swastika, but I wonder if—like so many characters before—Aldo might just be speaking for the filmmaker behind the camera and behind that carefully chosen line. And so, Ed, I ask you: Is Inglourious Basterds Quentin Tarantino's masterpiece?

ED HOWARD: If you'd asked me beforehand, I never would've expected to be saying this, but like you I've seen the film twice now, and yes, I'd declare it to be Tarantino's masterpiece. Why wasn't I expecting this? Well, the trailers, which made the film look like an unrelenting farce, probably had something to do with that; I know you managed to avoid those, and I envy you for that. And then there's the World War II material, which to say the least did not seem like a natural fit for Tarantino; it was hard to know what to expect from this movie. So I went in with somewhat mixed expectations. Did I expect to be entertained and, as you so delicately put it, thrilled? Of course; I'd never expect any less from Tarantino. But did I expect something so tonally varied, so rich, so sprawling and intense? Did I expect to be stunned into silence at various points, or to feel so many conflicting emotions and ideas fighting for my attention? I can't say that I did. Shame on me.

So what does it mean for a film to be Tarantino's masterpiece? Well, for one thing it's everything that his past films have been, only more so. It's about other movies, of course, but more than that it's about The Movies, about the cinema and its power. It's cartoony and wild and over-the-top, sometimes awkward (hello, Eli Roth), often deeply moving, funny, heartbreaking, irreverent, silly, brutal and sensitive. It represents Tarantino really embracing his contradictions, making a movie that encompasses the totality of his cinematic range: from the bracing, patient building of suspense through dialogue in the film's major set pieces, to the caricatured treatment of Adolf Hitler (Martin Wuttke) and the "Nat-zi"-scalping Aldo "the Apache" Raine, to the melodramatic conflagration of the film's cathartic climax. I wondered before how Tarantino would approach a World War II movie, and the answer, as it turns out, is that he has made a World War II movie that isn't even really set in World War II, at least not as we know it. In other words, Tarantino has retreated fully into the Tarantinoverse and has made a movie that could only be set in his own unique cinematic world—and a film that, indeed, revels in the limitless possibilities of the cinema for creating these kinds of imaginative alternate realities.

Now you know where I stand, generally speaking. I have a feeling I know where you stand, too, based on your judicious selection of the word "thrilling" (with the implied "and nothing more"), but I'll ask anyway. You concluded our discussion of Tarantino's earlier films by saying that you haven't ever seen the light, that you're not one of the director's true believers. So has Inglourious Basterds changed your mind? Do you fully believe now?

JB: Inglourious Basterds has done nothing to substantially alter my opinion of Tarantino's previous films or his talent. I still believe he is a sometimes brilliant writer and an even better visualist whose biggest weakness is using film as a device to take masturbatory pleasure in his own genius, which, while considerable, isn't as infallible as he believes. However, there's no doubt in my mind: Inglourious Basterds is indeed Tarantino's masterpiece.

I say that a bit uncomfortably, I admit, because one of the many things that astounds me about this picture is how distinctly different it feels from its predecessors, even for all the ways it is utterly familiar. The last thing I want to do is give the impression that I regard this as Tarantino's finest picture because he has "grown up," or some such nonsense. This isn't me playing "I told you so" while delighting in watching Tarantino toe the line. Not at all. Tarantino wouldn't consider this film to be a condemnation of his earlier works, and I don't either. When I call Inglourious Basterds Tarantino's masterpiece, it's because of what it does, not because of anything that its predecessors might fail to do.

Like you, I appreciate Inglourious Basterds for its tremendous range, and I'm awed by its ability to play with contradictory genres, emotions and themes, not just in a single movie or a single scene but sometimes in a single shot. This is the same Tarantino we've come to revere and at times just barely tolerate (yep, that's an Eli Roth reference), but it's Tarantino at his most challenging and even most vulnerable. When I said that I was careful in calling Inglourious Basterds the most thrilling movie of the year, that's because, for all of the picture's successes, it is both exasperatingly and endearingly flawed. (Thrilling? Yes! And occasionally boring.) In proclaiming this Tarantino's masterpiece, I don't think I need to consider it the year's most affecting movie on all fronts, because it isn't.

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TAGS: death proof, grindhouse, inglourious basterds, jackie brown, kill bill, kill bill vol. 2, pulp fiction, quentin tarantino, the conversations








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