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It’s Only A Flesh Wound: In Defense of Lars von Trier’s Antichrist

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It’s Only A Flesh Wound: In Defense of Lars von Trier’s Antichrist

If you’re a fan of cinema with a capital ’C,’ you’re surely aware of the buzz surrounding Antichrist, the latest from Danish enfant terrible Lars von Trier (he of the Dogme 95 manifesto, that phobic and depressive auteur rumored to have driven Björk to eat her own sweater during the making of Dancer in the Dark). The film garnered a Best Actress prize at this year’s Cannes Film Festival for its leading lady, Charlotte Gainsbourg, who was upstaged only by her director proclaiming to be the Holy Father himself. Gainsbourg plays “She” to Willem Dafoe’s “He”—they’re a couple whose toddler crawls right out an open window while they’re engaged in some hot, slo-mo, B&W-shot sex. Unable to come to terms with her child’s death, She spends an unproductive month drugged out in a hospital before He, a therapist by trade, decides the only cure is to whisk her away to a cabin in the woods called Eden for some intense fear facing. Of course, since this is a von Trier film, things can only get devilishly nasty.

You’ve probably heard about the fox that takes a break from devouring his own entrails to announce “Chaos reigns,” about the close-ups of human penetration, and about genitalia (both intact and mutilated). Most importantly, though, you’ve probably heard about von Trier’s misogynistic depiction of female sexuality, as Gainsbourg’s character alternates between bottomless despair, insatiable nymphomania and all-consuming anti-heroics, her clueless husband getting caught in the evil female tide. Well, forget what you’ve heard—or at least reserve judgment. As Dafoe’s He says about fear, “Your thoughts distort reality, not the other way around.” The reality is there ain’t one misogynistic frame in this simultaneously sexy, scary and hilarious flick.

Perhaps the most fascinating aspect of Antichrist occurred off-screen. Von Trier, who normally operates his own camera, created the film in the midst of a debilitating depression that left his hands trembling so badly he had to turn shooting duties over to his highly skilled crew, including cinematographer Anthony Dod Mantle. The first half of Antichrist is rather tedious and slow, full of stilted dialogue and film school thesis images, as if the usually controlling director wasn’t strong enough to carry the production and lost his way. He finds his footing once he gives into the freefall in “Chapter 3,” which begins the couple’s descent into Eden’s heart of darkness. As the story unfolds, what becomes thrillingly apparent is that this “misogynist” filmmaker is, in fact, not objectifying Gainsbourg’s character but bravely identifying with her.

Von Trier made it clear as far back as Breaking The Waves that he’s interested in exploring the good virgin/evil whore dichotomy (as was Hitchcock, only in his case that “misogyny” was spun as a harmless “fetish” for blondes and bondage). As in any BDSM relationship (and what is S&M if not the eroticization of fear?), it is Gainsbourg’s submissive character that’s in control and calling the shots, ordering Dafoe’s “daddy” He to hit her during sex. (And tellingly, the screwing never involves foreplay; it’s only nature’s sexual act of creation that we witness.) The Danish director’s contempt for rational analytical answers—which take the form of psychobabble such as He’s “What the mind can believe and conceive it can achieve”—shines through in Gainsbourg’s own angry lines. If Gainsbourg’s She is the Antichrist then so is von Trier. And it is Dafoe’s arrogant character that must be taught a lesson, must learn to embrace the irrational if he is to survive. “Chaos reigns,” indeed.

Recently, writer Diablo Cody—who I’m far from being a fan of—gave an insightful interview in which she expressed her fondness for slasher films because she viewed those nubile-coeds-get-chopped-to-pieces movies as empowering. After all, it was always one of those hot young things that took the knife or axe into her own hand in the end. In its own way, Antichrist is not a condemnation of female sexuality, not a retelling of that age-old vagina dentata myth, but simply an acknowledgment of those human impulses beyond our control—a humbling celebration of nature’s triumph over mankind. In fact, Antichrist, with its evocative atmospheric sound design and gorgeously stylized cinematography (which includes one startling image that resembles a Brueghel painting and stays with you long after all the B-movie blood and guts have faded) has more in common with Werner Herzog’s Fitzcarraldo than it does with anything in the horror genre. And like Herzog, Denmark’s premiere provocateur knows not to be afraid to laugh at the absurdity of chaos. Especially when the joke is on him.

Brooklyn-based writer Lauren Wissot is the publisher of the blog Beyond the Green Door, the author of the memoir Under My Master’s Wings, and a contributor to The Reeler.

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Watch: The Long-Awaited Deadwood Movie Gets Teaser Trailer and Premiere Date

Welcome to fucking Deadwood!

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Deadwood
Photo: HBO

At long last, we’re finally going to see more of Deadwood. Very soon after the HBO series’s cancellation in 2006, creator David Milch announced that he agreed to produce a pair of two-hour films to tie up the loose ends left after the third season. It’s been a long road since, and after many false starts over the years, production on one standalone film started in fall 2018. And today we have a glorious teaser for the film, which releases on HBO on May 31. Below is the official description of the film:

The Deadwood film follows the indelible characters of the series, who are reunited after ten years to celebrate South Dakota’s statehood. Former rivalries are reignited, alliances are tested and old wounds are reopened, as all are left to navigate the inevitable changes that modernity and time have wrought.

And below is the teaser trailer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAcftIUE6MQ

Deadwood: The Movie airs on HBO on May 31.

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Watch: Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood Gets Teaser Trailer

When it rains, it pours.

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Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
Photo: Columbia Pictures

When it rains, it pours. Four days after Quentin Tarantino once more laid into John Ford in a piece written for his Beverly Cinema website that saw the filmmaker referring to Ford’s She Wore a Yellow Ribbon as Tie a Yellow Ribbon, and two days after Columbia Pictures released poster art for QT’s ninth feature that wasn’t exactly of the highest order, the studio has released a teaser for Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. The film was announced early last year, with Tarantino describing it as “a story that takes place in Los Angeles in 1969, at the height of hippy Hollywood.”

Set on the eve of the Manson family murders, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood tells the story of TV actor Rick Dalton (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his stunt double, Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt), as they try to get involved in the film industry. The film also stars Margot Robbie (as Sharon Tate), Al Pacino, the late Luke Perry, Damian Lewis, Dakota Fanning, Emile Hirsch, Timothy Olyphant, Kurt Russell, and Bruce Dern in a part originally intended for the late Burt Reynolds.

See the teaser below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Scf8nIJCvs4

Columbia Pictures will release Once Upon a Time in Hollywood on July 26.

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Watch the Stranger Things 3 Trailer, and to the Tune of Mötley Crüe and the Who

A wise woman once said that there’s no such thing as a coincidence.

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Stranger Things 3
Photo: Netflix

A wise woman once said that there’s no such thing as a coincidence. On Friday, Jeff Tremaine’s The Dirt, a biopic about Mötley Crüe’s rise to fame, drops on Netflix. Today, the streaming service has released the trailer for the third season of Stranger Things. The clip opens with the strains of Mötley Crüe’s “Home Sweet Home,” all the better to underline that the peace and quiet that returned to the fictional rural town of Hawkins, Indiana at the end of the show’s second season is just waiting to be upset again.

Little is known about the plot of the new season, and the trailer keeps things pretty vague, though the Duffer Brothers have suggested that the storyline will take place a year after the events of the last season—duh, we know when “Home Sweet Home” came out—and focus on the main characters’ puberty pangs. That said, according to Reddit sleuths who’ve obsessed over such details as the nuances of the new season’s poster art, it looks like Max and company are going to have to contend with demon rats no doubt released from the Upside Down.

See below for the new season’s trailer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEG3bmU_WaI

Stranger Things 3 premieres globally on July 4.

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