Ursula Rucker Supa Sista

Ursula Rucker Supa Sista

3.5 out of 53.5 out of 53.5 out of 53.5 out of 53.5 out of 53.5

Comments Comments (0)

After years of work with artists across the spectrum (the Roots, Jazzanova, Josh Wink), Philly-born poet/singer Ursula Rucker has released her first full-length album, Supa Sista. The disc runs the gamut of social consciousness, from inner-city school system politics (the tabla-infused “Philadelphia Child”) to child molestation (the chilling “Song for Billy”). The exquisite “7,” featuring M.A.D. and Vicki Miles, recounts the construction and gradual erosion of a relationship: “The belly flutters…The soft sweet-as-apple-butter kisses…From night flights inside fancy and fantasy/Now we a family.” The track “What???” takes the “near non-existent state of black music” to task; while Rucker’s didactic tone is a bit awkward (the rest of the album speaks volumes more by sheer example), it’s an accurate and long-overdue diss from within: “No Crissy, no thongs…No lies about your ghetto rep.” “Digichant” explores the long-festering debate on technology (is the world shrinking by speed of communication or are we growing more isolated?), Rucker’s voice digitally pitched up and down across a backdrop of electronic programming: “Can you/Fuck me with your modem/Talk dirty while you finger your diseased keys?” Supa Sista’s mix of new jazz, soul and analog synthesis creates a muggy sweetness that’s strung cohesively by a slew of producers (Alexkid, King Britt, among others). “All they can or want to see/Are scantily clad asses that swing/And beg to be slapped/During self satisfying sex/Say my name,” Rucker says on “Womansong.” This ain’t no Destiny’s Child; it’s Nuyorican poetry, it’s the unadorned essence of hip-hop.

Release Date
November 15, 2001
Label
!K7
Buy
Amazon