House Logo
Explore categories +

Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread Gets First Trailer and Poster

Comments Comments (...)

Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread Gets First Trailer and Poster

Focus Features

Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread Gets First Trailer and Poster

The trailer for Paul Thomas Anderson's eighth feature-length film dropped less than 30 minutes ago and cinephiles are already frothing at the mouth. Phantom Thread marks Anderson's second collaboration with Daniel Day-Lewis, who announced earlier this year that he would retire from acting after the release of the film. The three-time Oscar winner has also stated that working on the film caused him to dream of a second career in fashion.

Curb Your Enthusiasm Recap Season 9, Episode 4, “Running with the Bulls”

Comments Comments (...)

Curb Your Enthusiasm Recap: Season 9, Episode 4, “Running with the Bulls”

John P. Johnson/HBO

Curb Your Enthusiasm Recap: Season 9, Episode 4, “Running with the Bulls”

Throughout its original eight-season run, Curb Your Enthusiasm questioned the limits of political correctness and offended nearly every group in the process. In doing so, the series produced some wonderfully uncomfortable (and impossibly funny) television. “Running with the Bulls,” though, is what happens when Curb's inherently problematic humor fails.

The Deuce Recap Season 1, Episode 7, “Au Reservoir”

Comments Comments (...)

The Deuce Recap: Season 1, Episode 7, “Au Reservoir”

Paul Schiraldi

The Deuce Recap: Season 1, Episode 7, “Au Reservoir”

David Simon's The Wire helped to make the Momentous Penultimate Episode a hallmark of prestige television, so it's fitting that tonight's “Au Reservoir” ends with The Deuce's first shocking twist of the season. When the usually docile Leon (Anwan Glover) snaps, killing Reggie Love (Tariq Trotter), the act dutifully provides gravity to an episode that fixates on the show's peripheral characters. The Deuce has consistently balanced cynical appraisal of urban development with a humanist attention to individuals, and after last week's focus on the broad influences affecting Times Square, the season's second-to-last episode looks to the background, prominently featuring Ashley (Jamie Neumann), Paul (Chris Coy), and the now-listless crew of pimps.

Interview: Michael Urie on Bringing Torch Song to the Second Stage Theater

Comments Comments (...)

Interview: Michael Urie on Bringing Torch Song to the Second Stage Theater

Joan Marcus

Interview: Michael Urie on Bringing Torch Song to the Second Stage Theater

When we last chatted with Michael Urie, the genial and charismatic actor was enjoying the success of Buyer & Cellar at the Rattlestick Playwrights Theater. Playing a fictional version of Barbara Streisand in that solo comedy, he now says, prepared him for his latest venture Off Broadway: the lead in Harvey Fierstein's celebrated Torch Song Trilogy. Urie plays Arnold Beckoff, a drag queen in search of love and family life in New York City. Now re-titled Torch Song, the hit from the early 1980s is getting its first major revival at the Second Stage Theater (now through December 3). The production, directed by Moisés Kaufman, also stars Mercedes Ruehl as Arnold's loving yet crushingly disapproving mother. We talked recently to Urie about the return of the seminal gay play and what it was like taking on the role originally made famous by the playwright Fierstein himself nearly four decades ago.

American Horror Story: Cult Recap Episode 7, “Valerie Solanas Died for Your Sins: Scumbag”

Comments Comments (...)

American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 7, “Valerie Solanas Died for Your Sins: Scumbag”
American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 7, “Valerie Solanas Died for Your Sins: Scumbag”

Toward the end of “Valerie Solanas Died for Your Sins: Scumbag,” Kai (Evan Peters) confesses to Winter (Billie Lourd) that while he's gotten far on charisma and fear, his cult can't go any further without a deeper philosophy. The emptiness of Kai's accomplishments, the need for something more, serves to self-define American Horror Story: Cult itself. The show's greatest successes have come from its performances and the real-world traumas from which it's blatantly taken inspiration. But the strength of the standalone flashback that occupies much of this episode—the rise and fall of Valerie Solanas (Lena Dunham)—speaks to the weakness of the overall season.

Curb Your Enthusiasm Recap Season 9, Episode 3, “A Disturbance in the Kitchen”

Comments Comments (...)

Curb Your Enthusiasm Recap: Season 9, Episode 3, “A Disturbance in the Kitchen”

John P. Johnson/HBO

Curb Your Enthusiasm Recap: Season 9, Episode 3, “A Disturbance in the Kitchen”

In the season-seven finale of Curb Your Enthusiasm, Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld pick apart the phrase “having said that.” “You say what you really want to say,” notes Larry, “and then you negate it.” To which Jerry adds, “You win either way.” The exchange may seem like a simple semantic criticism, but it's a fitting turn of phrase for the inhabitants of the Curb universe, for whom bluntness and approval-seeking are coincident, often contradictory traits.

The Deuce Recap Season 1, Episode 6, “Why Me?”

Comments Comments (...)

The Deuce Recap: Season 1, Episode 6, “Why Me?”

Paul Schiraldi

The Deuce Recap: Season 1, Episode 6, “Why Me?”

The first five episodes of The Deuce foresaw the drastic transformation of New York City's sex trade, and in “Why Me?” a new framework finally materializes. The brothels are open. Porn is here. And keeping with the show's devotion to historical accuracy, the revolution is far from explosive.

BFI London Film Festival 2017 Anne Fontaine’s Reinventing Marvin

Comments Comments (...)

BFI London Film Festival 2017: Anne Fontaine’s Reinventing Marvin

BFI London Film Festival

BFI London Film Festival 2017: Anne Fontaine’s Reinventing Marvin

For anyone who's read Edouard Louis's 2014 novel The End of Eddy, a gut-wrenching account of growing up poor and gay in rural France, Reinventing Marvin will feel like a botched job. That's mostly because the book is so delicately diaristic, having been written by Louis when he was just 19, and before he shot into literary superstardom. Writer-director Anne Fontaine bypasses any attempt at faithfulness to her source material, cutting it into a million pieces and re-assembling the work like a postmodern collage.

As much as Fontaine's cinematic histrionics are beautiful to watch, like a Frankesteinian feast for the eyes, it's as if the soul of Louis's work has been diluted by the filmmaker's need to reinvent not Marvin, but the literary lineage that makes the project so striking in the first place. Because of the film's playing with temporality and style, the simplicity and linearity of Louis's prose is lost. We're certainly not allowed to spend enough time with the film's Marvin, played by the eerily melancholic Jules Porier, and ache with him—the kind of identification that The End of Eddy made possible.

BFI London Film Festival 2017 Andrey Zvyagintsev’s Loveless

Comments Comments (...)

BFI London Film Festival 2017: Andrey Zvyagintsev’s Loveless

Sony Pictures Classics

BFI London Film Festival 2017: Andrey Zvyagintsev’s Loveless

We tend to think of the family as a space for love and the child as representative of the new. Loveless exposes families to be, instead, havens of hatred and the child as nothing but a fresh container for an ancient history of gloom. Zhenya (Maryana Spivak) and Boris (Aleksey Rozin), soon to be divorced but still living under the same roof, repeat the same emotional indifference that was passed on to them by their parents. But their son, Alyosha (Matvey Novikov), stages an intervention in their genealogical tree of horrors by fleeing their home. No one seems to have ever wanted him—and it's only when he goes missing that he seems to merit parental attention. Not that he ceases to be a nuisance ready to be shipped to a boarding school followed by a military career, which is what Zhenya desires, but because now the adults have to respond to societal demands of his whereabouts.

BFI London Film Festival 2017 Annemarie Jacir’s Wajib

Comments Comments (...)

BFI London Film Festival 2017: Annemarie Jacir’s Wajib

BFI London Film Festival

BFI London Film Festival 2017: Annemarie Jacir’s Wajib

For anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss, society exchanges three fundamental things: words, women, and goods. Writer-director Annemarie Jacir explores those very objects of exchange in the most delicate of ways throughout Wajib. Although Amal (Maria Zreik) is getting married, neither her wedding nor the film itself is really about her. Both are about the men—her father, Shadi (Saleh Bakri), and her brother, Abu Shadi (Mohammad Bakri)—in charge of making the delivery of the goods: that is, the woman, her gown, and the invitations for the ceremony. Abu Shadi has returned home to Nazareth from Italy specially for the occasion, and the expatriate's homecoming serves as an opportunity for all sorts of words to be exchanged between father and son—namely those that have been bottled up for so long, or at least since Shadi and Amal's mother left them to pursue a love story in America.