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The Color Wheel (#110 of 6)

Slant’s Top 25 Films of 2012

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Slant’s Top 25 Films of 2012
Slant’s Top 25 Films of 2012

From Calum Marsh’s introduction to Slant Magazine’s Top 25 Films of 2012: “Two thousand and twelve was, if nothing else, a banner year for uncommonly productive provocation. Audiences were galled by Rick Alverson’s divisive deconstruction of hipsterdom, The Comedy, beguiled by the taciturn charms of Paul Thomas Anderson’s The Master, and, um, probed by the penetrating cultural criticism of David Cronenberg’s Cosmopolis. Masters of cinema both old and new even found time, between saucy bouts of male stripping and fellating chicken parts, to butt heads with every conceivable status quo, grappling admirably with hot-button issues as wide-ranging as colonialism (Tabu), U.S.-endorsed torture (Zero Dark Thirty, maybe or maybe not endorsing it itself), and the very nature of cinema (Jafar Panahi, who didn’t make a ’film’ at all).” Click here to read the feature and see if your favorite films of the year made our list. And see below for a list of the films that just missed making it onto our list, followed by our contributors’ individual ballots.

AFI Fest 2011: A Separation, The Color Wheel, & Green

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AFI Fest 2011: <em>A Separation</em>, <em>The Color Wheel</em>, & <em>Green</em>
AFI Fest 2011: <em>A Separation</em>, <em>The Color Wheel</em>, & <em>Green</em>

Human beings have the unique ability to turn miscommunication and misunderstanding into an art form, especially when it comes to the complicated nature of relationships. Fittingly, this year’s AFI Fest was in no short supply of challenging narratives dealing with the brutal consequences of emotional entanglements gone sour. The most gripping example has to be Iranian director Asghar Farhadi’s brilliant mosaic A Separation, a staggeringly sharp drama that charts the collective downfall of many different couplings after a seemingly small disagreement is made exponentially worse by denial, judgment, and guilt. To get an idea of A Separation’s thematic scope, imagine a slow moving avalanche that starts with a single bad decision, then spirals out of control, consuming everyone in sight. Even as Farhadi slowly unveils more narrative information, the consequences of each character’s actions and reactions have an ambiguous, real-world feel that resonates deeply.

A Conversation with Alex Ross Perry About The Color Wheel

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A Conversation with Alex Ross Perry About The Color Wheel
A Conversation with Alex Ross Perry About The Color Wheel

I know Alex Ross Perry from the movies, from seeing him at repertory screenings in New York. Before I had even met Alex, I heard a rumor that he had made Out 1 T-shirts to commemorate the “I was there” experience of that rare, 13-hour film’s U.S. premiere. Who was this kid? Oftentimes I’ve been at screenings with just five people in the audience: Alex, a notable critic, a DP (who shot Alex’s films) and a publicist/programmer (who has a cameo in Alex’s latest film). It was rewarding, then, to see his second film The Color Wheel and see that the lessons from all those films had sunk in. Alex made a film that feels like films he seeks out—idiosyncratic and perfectly flawed, and awaiting discovery. I spoke with Alex about his film, and then asked him to make a list of some of his most memorable moviegoing experiences.

Lichman and Rizov “Live” at Grassroots Tavern: Season 6, Episode 3: “The Color Wheel Podcast”

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Lichman and Rizov “Live” at Grassroots Tavern: Season 6, Episode 3: “The Color Wheel Podcast”
Lichman and Rizov “Live” at Grassroots Tavern: Season 6, Episode 3: “The Color Wheel Podcast”

Hello Atlantic Avenue!

We’re back with episode 3—which you’re going to hear first due to timeliness before Episode 2—and are joined at Grassroots Tavern by Alex Ross Perry, director of The Color Wheel, which premieres this Sunday at BAMcinemaFest. This is the second time we’ve had Perry on (the first for his feature Impolex, which you can download here) and we even allow him the distinct honor of rating us via the Pitchfork Scale.

But we do go into the nature of awkward party scenes, obscure references thanks to Chris “Wheels” Wells and a little into the Shaw Brothers’ The Boxer’s Omen. Regardless listen onward, mind the spoilers toward the end and do your damndest to get tickets to this Sunday’s screening. If you don’t, the gargoyles will cry and the dolphins will smile.

As always, if you see us at the bar or at the BAM, buy us a drink! Or a ticket! Or a meal! please.