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Cate Blanchett (#110 of 37)

Watch the New Trailer for Ocean’s 8 Starring Sandra Bullock and Rihanna

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Watch the New Trailer for Ocean’s 8 Starring Sandra Bullock and Rihanna

Warner Bros.

Watch the New Trailer for Ocean’s 8 Starring Sandra Bullock and Rihanna

The new trailer for Ocean’s 8 reminds us, more than once, that committing a crime can be deliciously fun if you happen to be part of a crime syndicate composed entirely of women and that counts Sandra Bullock as its boss lady. In the film, Bullock stars as Debbie Ocean (Danny Ocean’s estranged sister, if you’re wondering), who, along with her motley crew of merry women (played by Cate Blanchett, Mindy Kaling, Sara Paulson, Awkwafina, Rihanna, and Helena Bonham Carter), plans a heist at the annual Met Gala. Among the reported cameos in the film: Anna Wintour, Alexander Wang, Kim Kardashian, Maria Sharapova, Zayn Malik, Kendall Jenner, Katie Holmes, Olivia Munn, Serena Williams, Kylie Jenner, and Zac Posen. Sadly, no Madonna, a staple of the Met Gala. Or Rebecca Romijn, star of Brian De Palma’s Femme Fatale, which opens with what may be the most incredibly directed heist in the history of the movies. Which is to say, Ocean’s 8 director Gary Ross has a lot to live up to. Notably, the trailer for the film sees Debbie Ocean and company riding the subway, perhaps to get to the Met Gala, suggesting that they will actually not get to the event in time to rob Anne Hathaway’s Princess Diaries jewels. If you don’t live in New York: Sorry for ruining the movie, but our subways are no good. Please send help.

Los Cabos International Film Festival Jackie, Voyage of Time, Hasta la Raiz, & The Red Turtle

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Los Cabos International Film Festival: Jackie, Voyage of Time, Hasta la Raiz, & The Red Turtle

Fox Searchlight Pictures

Los Cabos International Film Festival: Jackie, Voyage of Time, Hasta la Raiz, & The Red Turtle

When I left my apartment in Brooklyn for John F. Kennedy International Airport, late at night on November 8th, neither Hilary Rodham Clinton nor Donald J. Trump had yet secured the 270 electoral votes necessary to be elected the 45th president of the United States. By the time I got through security checks and made it to my gate—where TV screens were broadcasting returns from key battleground states—the race was called. Of course, I needn’t hear the result: I saw it on the faces of the people waiting to board, a mix of utter shock and overwhelming concern that the future of our republic would be determined by the most inexperienced, unqualified, and roundly disreputable person to ever hold the highest office.

Toronto Film Review Terrence Malick’s Voyage of Time

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Toronto Film Review: Terrence Malick’s Voyage of Time

Broad Green Pictures

Toronto Film Review: Terrence Malick’s Voyage of Time

Resembling an expansion of the creation sequence from 2011’s The Tree of Life, Voyage of Time is arguably the fullest expression of the cosmic themes that filmmaker Terrence Malick has explored for the last decade. With the exception of occasional snippets of low-grade, full-frame digital video of contemporary urban poverty, the film follows a linear trajectory from the formation of the solar system through the eventual collapse of our sun. Traveling to the corners of the globe to collect beautiful shots of unmolested nature to stand in for the prehistoric world, Malick also employs various effects to evoke the emergence of life on a planet from the primordial soup, such as drips of paint that seem to flower into tendrils of stardust, or a digitally rendered neural network to chart a map of the human brain.

Watch Cate Blanchett’s Face Melt in John Hillcoat’s Music Video for Massive Attack’s “The Spoils”

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Watch Cate Blanchett’s Face Melt in John Hillcoat’s Music Video for Massive Attack’s “The Spoils”
Watch Cate Blanchett’s Face Melt in John Hillcoat’s Music Video for Massive Attack’s “The Spoils”

Director John Hillcoat, best known for his genre-driven films The Proposition, which was written by Nick Cave, and The Road, has enlisted two-time Oscar winner Cate Blanchett for his music video for Massive Attack’s “The Spoils,” the title track from the U.K. trip-hop pioneers’ new EP. The clip opens with a stark close-up of the Carol star donning minimal makeup; as the image slowly degrades, so does Blanchett’s famously steely face, first morphing into a plaster cast of her head before gradually turning into a mask with hollow eyes and a wig on top. Ultimately, the actress’s face is unrecognizable, as guest vocalist Hope Sandoval (of Mazzy Star fame) sings, “I somehow slowly love you/I wanna keep you the same.” By the video’s end, Blanchett has become a digitally rendered bust made of porous rock, eventually so eroded that any trace of her visage has vanished.

Oscar 2016 Winner Predictions Actress

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Oscar 2016 Winner Predictions: Actress

A24

Oscar 2016 Winner Predictions: Actress

Will voters who secretly agree with the eternally crusty Charlotte Rampling’s tempest-in-a-teapot comments about the purported reverse racism of #OscarsSoWhite feel like tempting fate this year? Will those who don’t even care one way or the other about her performance throw her a secret vote in solidarity? She quickly recanted her comments, saying she was misinterpreted, but this is one year no genies will easily go back into their bottles. It doesn’t matter matter how great her performance may be in Andrew Haigh’s patient 45 Years. Her impatient retraction, made as Academy members are publicly sighing their collective exasperation over being called out, simply felt unconvincing. Rampling’s firm, tony demeanor on and off screen, compounded by almost exclusively highbrow critics’ enthusiasm in her favor, was probably never going to move the needle much for an AMPAS still struggling to reassure the public they’re in touch with the times. But sticking to her guns may have given the longshot her best chance.

Cannes Film Festival 2015 Carol

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Cannes Film Festival 2015: Carol
Cannes Film Festival 2015: Carol

Adapted by Phyllis Nagy from Patricia Highsmith’s The Price of Salt, Carol is a continuation and refinement of Todd Haynes’s signature concerns, slotting into his filmography like a wintry, understated cousin to Far from Heaven. While the normative forces of society once again threaten a burgeoning love affair, this time around it’s the wistful glances, passing touches, and wordless complicity of love itself that take center stage.

It’s Christmas 1952 and Therese Belivet (Rooney Mara), a smart, unassuming wannabe photographer, is making ends meet by working at an upmarket department store. One customer cannot help but catch her eye: the older, married Carol Aird (Cate Blanchett), who follows her sales suggestions without hesistation and just happens to leave her gloves on the counter as she walks off. The return of the items ushers in a lunch, which in turn ushers in drinks at Aird’s country house, with Carol’s angry, soon-to-be ex-husband, Harge (Kyle Chandler), the only real fly in the ointment. The growing attraction between Carol and Therese is never verbalized, but rather emerges with organic grace in gazes and gestures. The most ravishing example of this comes when Carol drives Therese to her estate for the first time, Therese’s eye wandering across the landscape of Carol’s face as the car enters a tunnel, its gleaming lights illuminating and obscuring Blanchett’s smile in equal measure, before one immaculately gloved finger presses the necessary button and the strings on the soundtrack merge with the song that now starts up on the car radio.

Berlinale 2015 Cinderella

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Berlinale 2015: Cinderella
Berlinale 2015: Cinderella

Kenneth Branagh’s Cinderella is, for the most part, a straightforward retelling of the fairy tale, and the Walt Disney Pictures imprimatur ensures that the filmmaker forgoes the more violent moments in the Brothers Grimm version of the story (no one cuts their toes off here in order to fit into Cinderella’s glass slipper; to see that, you’d have to turn to Stephen Sondheim’s Into the Woods). Which isn’t to say that the film doesn’t have its own distinct virtues. Dante Ferretti’s color production design and Sandy Powell’s wide-ranging costumes (the black-with-green-stripes design on wicked stepmother Lady Tremaine’s dress offers an expressive contrast with Cinderella’s initial plain pink dress) are so intoxicatingly colorful that every shot has the immersiveness of a dream. But it’s the emotional reality with which Branagh, screenwriter Chris Weitz, and his cast ground this Cinderella that makes it as affecting as it is.

Oscar 2014 Composite Winner Predictions

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Oscar 2014 Composite Winner Predictions
Oscar 2014 Composite Winner Predictions

Below is a complete list of our predicted winners at the 2014 Academy Awards.

Picture: Gravity
Director: Alfonso Cuarón, Gravity
Actor: Matthew McConaughey, Dallas Buyers Club
Actress: Cate Blanchett, Blue Jasmine
Supporting Actor: Jared Leto, Dallas Buyers Club
Supporting Actress: Lupita Nyong’o, 12 Years a Slave
Original Screenplay: Her
Adapted Screenplay: 12 Years a Slave
Foreign Language: The Great Beauty
Documentary Feature: Twenty Feet from Stardom
Animated Feature Film: Frozen
Documentary Short: The Lady in Number 6: Music Saved My Life
Animated Short: Mr. Hubolt
Live Action Short: Helium
Film Editing: Gravity
Production Design: The Great Gatsby
Cinematography: Gravity
Costume Design: The Great Gatsby
Makeup and Hairstyling: Dallas Buyers Club
Score: Gravity
Song: “Let It Go,” Frozen
Sound Editing: Gravity
Sound Mixing: Gravity
Visual Effects: Gravity

Oscar 2014 Winner Predictions Actress

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Oscar 2014 Winner Predictions: Actress
Oscar 2014 Winner Predictions: Actress

If there’s anything with even the slightest ability to nudge Cate Blanchett’s path to Oscar victory off course, it’s the seemingly endless Farrowgate scandal, which has Woody Allen’s allegedly molested daughter calling out his muses by name, and guilting them in an attempt to harm the director by extension. As Mark Harris brilliantly observed in his Grantland essay “Oscar Season Turns Ugly,” this kind of linkage of Oscar results to actual sociopolitical issues is at once necessary and ludicrous—a tricky conundrum that can’t be assessed “without acknowledging that something horrible is being inappropriately trivialized and something trivial is being inappropriately transformed into a crisis of situational ethics.” I don’t think anyone ever felt that Blanchett, an unerringly shrewd celebrity, would have indulged the open invitation to address this scandal in her subsequent acceptance speeches. But few likely foresaw that, amid a pop-cultural atmosphere in which the topic simply cannot be ignored, the Aussie frontrunner would find a way to dodge it while taking an unimpeachable high road, dedicating her Best Actress BAFTA win Sunday night to the “late, great Philip Seymour Hoffman.” In raising her Stoli martini with a twist of lemon to one of the Academy’s departed elite, odds are Blanchett closed whatever case Dylan Farrow had in terms of exacting revenge by setting a trip wire for Blue Jasmine’s leading lady.