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Twin Peaks: The Return Recap Part 16

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Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 16

Suzanne Tenner/Showtime

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 16

“Part 16” of Twin Peaks: The Return is perhaps most remarkable for its numerous arrivals and departures, some of them quite literal, some a bit more metaphorical. In a more rules-oriented series, the second-to-last episode of the season would be spent mostly marking time, given over to scrupulously setting the stage for the finale. There were traces of that here, of course, but rendered wonderfully rich and strange through David Lynch’s meticulous attention to off-kilter audiovisual textures and details.

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap Part 15

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Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 15

Showtime

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 15

Though it opens with the ecstatic consummation of one of Twin Peak’s longest-running thwarted love affairs, “Part 15” of Twin Peaks: The Return soon after plunges again into a nightmarish spectacle of self-destruction and shrieking madness. The episode also marks the most explicit reference yet to one of the show’s most poignant and haunting themes: the looming specter of ineluctable mortality. Oh, and David Bowie’s Phillip Jeffries finally makes an appearance (of sorts) in the form of a giant, steam-spewing teapot. Even better, we finally get to talk about Judy!

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap Part 13

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Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 13

Suzanne Tenner/Showtime

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 13

Last night’s episode of Twin Peaks: The Return testified to the life-affirming power of cherry pie, gave viewers an object lesson in Existentialism 101, and suggested, in suitably surreal fashion, that the more things change, the more they stay the same. A recurrent leitmotiv in the show’s iconography, cherry pie signifies David Lynch’s unabashed embrace of old-fashioned Americana, a deep-running feeling of kinship and respect for the salt-of-the-earth denizens of the country’s outlying and often overlooked small towns. In “Part 13,” a damn good slice of cherry pie plays a pivotal role in several storylines.

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap Part 10

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Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 10

Suzanne Tenner/Showtime

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 10

In “The Marriage of Heaven and Hell,” William Blake wrote: “Without Contraries is no progression…Love and Hate are necessary to Human existence.” Last night’s installment of Twin Peaks: The Return illuminated the precarious balance between these two opposing forces, previously represented as overarching cosmic principles in “Part 8” but here embodied at the level of all-too-human experience in ways both touching and terrifying.

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap Part 6

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Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 6

Showtime

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 6

Many of the events in the latest episode of Twin Peaks: The Return seem to depend on the toss of a coin, inviting speculation about the balance between chance and necessity in the lives of the characters. When Richard Horne (Eamon Farren) buys a load of a drug called “sparkle” from Red (Balthazar Getty), the latter bewilders Richard with a surreal coin trick. The coin impossibly hangs in the air for some time, before then manifesting in Richard’s mouth. Except it hasn’t, because it’s back in Red’s palm. Red tells Richard: “Heads I win. Tails you lose.” Chance obviously isn’t a factor in their deal. The game is rigged, as the house always wins—and it’s an encounter that sets in motion a series of events that reverberates throughout the episode.

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap Part 5

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Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 5

Showtime

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 5

The establishing shot of the glittering nighttime Las Vegas skyline that opens “Part 5” of Twin Peaks: The Return dissolves to a street-level prowl through an old-school, neon-lit district before cutting to the Rancho Rosa billboard, moodily lit by a spotlight. The hit men who’ve been lying in wait for Dougie Jones (Kyle MacLachlan) report back that his car hasn’t moved. And for the first time, we’re introduced to their higher-up: an agitated woman sitting behind a cluttered desk, with a makeup smudge (or faded bruise) visible on her cheek, who hastily sends off a text that cryptically reads “Argent 2.”