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Anchorman The Legend Of Ron Burgundy (#110 of 3)

Poster Lab: Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues

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Poster Lab: <em>Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues</em>
Poster Lab: <em>Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues</em>

He’s back. No, not just Ron Burgundy, but The Mustache. It’s always fun, and even admirable, when a film can boast an element so iconic it becomes a virtual calling card. It’s great fodder for teaser posters like this one, which puts so much confidence in its protagonist’s facial hair that it doesn’t even bother including the film’s title (or the rest of star Will Ferrell’s face, for that matter). Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues comes just shy of a decade after its 2004 predecessor, and its enduring relevance is due to the vibrant life Anchorman found on home video, re-watched and quoted ad nauseum by college boys and anyone with a fondness for Ferrell. Burgundy is easily Ferrell’s most adored creation, a bumbling news powerhouse turned underdog who’s as arrogant as he is ignorant. His delusions of supreme grandeur encapsulate him, right down to his fashion, his hairstyle, and yes, that bushy rug beneath his nose. More apt for porn than a roundup of the day’s top stories, the mustache hasn’t been outperformed since Burgundy made his first appearance, not even by noble competitors like the yellow tuft on the cute little face of The Lorax (both ’staches appeared on our list of 15 Famous Movie Mustaches last year). Still, despite all this, does Anchorman 2 really deserve the oh-so-millenial tagline, “It’s kind of a big deal”?

15 Famous Movie Mustaches

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15 Famous Movie Mustaches
15 Famous Movie Mustaches

Brightening theaters this weekend is Illumination Entertainment’s take on Dr. Seuss’s The Lorax, which features Danny DeVito as the voice of the fuzzy and colorful eco-guardian. DeVito’s Lorax sports one bushy tuft of facial hair, its overgrowth stretching past the width of his waistline. The rest of cinema’s most memorable mustaches can’t boast that same disproportionate bulk, but they’re not to be undervalued. Two are among the most iconic physical traits in film history, four make up one big whiskery package deal, and one is so indelible that its wearer spawned the name for a whole style of ’stache.

Critical Distance: The Artist

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Critical Distance: <em>The Artist</em>
Critical Distance: <em>The Artist</em>

Sometimes it’s hard to separate a movie from the hype. Anyone who’s followed the nauseating Oscar prognostication over the last several months knew full well that Harvey Weinstein’s Michel Hazanavicius’s The Artist would win the Best Picture crown on Sunday’s telecast of the Academy Awards. Nonetheless, given its preordained victory, the critical dialogue about the film has become predictably antipathetic. As Scott Tobias observed recently, the political machine attached to frontrunners and winners often distorts our vision of them and renders reasonable discourse a challenge. Truth be told, these days the Oscar badge doesn’t hold much weight. The reason for this, Tobias concludes, is that Best Picture winners represent consensus over excellence. Oscar winners reflect more on the film industry’s own image of itself than the artistic significance of film. A.O. Scott articulates this in a recent piece in the New York Times, in which he and Manohla Dargis examine recent winners against the broader significance of the Oscars. Says Scott: