House Logo
Explore categories +

Battleship Potemkin (#110 of 3)

If I Had a Sight & Sound Film Ballot Rob Humanick’s Top 10 Films of All Time

Comments Comments (...)

If I Had a Sight & Sound Film Ballot: Rob Humanick’s Top 10 Films of All Time
If I Had a Sight & Sound Film Ballot: Rob Humanick’s Top 10 Films of All Time

Editor’s Note: In light of Sight & Sound’s film poll, which, every decade, queries critics and directors the world over before arriving at a communal Top 10 list, we polled our own writers, who didn’t partake in the project, but have bold, discerning, and provocative lists to share.

To choose only 10 films for this list was a task at once simple and impossible. Had I been given enough time to watch every film ever made, then allowed several decades to narrow down my choices, I would have still bemoaned this challenge. By the time this is published, I’ll have changed my mind. Held at gunpoint, however, the results would probably look something like this, and for my purposes here, know that the difference between “best” and “favorite” is immaterial. Every one of these represents not only a peak of the art form, but an experience I wonder whether I could truly live without. With apologies to Jean Renoir, Alfred Hitchcock, Buster Keaton, Charlie Chaplin, Steven Spielberg, F.W. Murnau, Nicholas Ray, Fritz Lang, Abel Gance, Werner Herzog, Carl Theodor Dreyer, Roman Polanski, Terrence Malick, Chuck Jones, Ridley Scott, George A. Romero, and the 1930s, among others.

Film Comment Selects 2011: Sodankyla Forever

Comments Comments (...)

Film Comment Selects 2011: <em>Sodankyla Forever</em>
Film Comment Selects 2011: <em>Sodankyla Forever</em>

Each year, Finland’s Midnight Sun Film Festival draws crowds with a unique program: 24 hours of movies, played uninterrupted while the sun keeps shining. Drawing at least some inspiration from its namesake, Sodankyla Forever, which takes its title from the festival’s Finnish name, is passionate and overstuffed, a dense cinematic treatise as told by the directors themselves.

The film’s biggest asset is its unusual stable of auteurs, which delves beyond the usual voices for speeches from Jean Rouch, Joseph H. Lewis, and Ettore Scola. The relative obscurity of these figures ties into Sodankyla Forever’s prevailing interests, which eventually come through in patchwork form. Using footage from a minor festival taking place in an isolated corner of the world, it presents moviemaking as a battle of underdogs against unbeatable forces, scrabbling to keep their work untouched.