House Logo
Explore categories +

Kevin Kolsch (#110 of 2)

Pet Sematary Remake, Starring Jason Clarke and Amy Seimetz, Gets Trailer

Comments Comments (...)

Pet Sematary Remake, Starring Jason Clarke and Amy Seimetz, Gets Trailer

Paramount Pictures

Pet Sematary Remake, Starring Jason Clarke and Amy Seimetz, Gets Trailer

Mary Lambert’s Pet Sematary, which was released the same year as the filmmaker made Madonna’s iconic “Like a Prayer” video, hasn’t aged as well as other Stephen King adaptations from the era. As such, it will come as a surprise to no one that a remake is on the horizon. Directed by Kevin Kölsch and Dennis Widmyer from a screenplay by David Kajganich and Jeff Buhler, the new Pet Sematary follows a doctor, Louis Creed (Jason Clarke), and his wife, Rachel (Amy Seimetz), who stumble upon a mysterious burial ground near their family’s new home in rural Maine. Tragedy naturally strikes, forcing Louis to turn to an unusual neighbor (played by the reliably unusual John Lithgow) and in the process unleashing an unfathomable evil that will no doubt have hyperbolic consequences.

Fantasia International Film Festival 2014: Starry Eyes and Cybernatural

Comments Comments (...)

Fantasia International Film Festival 2014: <em>Starry Eyes</em> and <em>Cybernatural</em>
Fantasia International Film Festival 2014: <em>Starry Eyes</em> and <em>Cybernatural</em>

Why are they laughing? This was the question I posed to my colleague as the lights rose in the DB Clarke Theatre, at the end of my first screening of the 2014 Fantasia Film Festival. We’d just endured a rather bleak horror film called Starry Eyes, and I was confounded by the atmosphere in the room—an air of revelry better suited to a midnight presentation of The Rocky Horror Picture Show than an amateur feature’s Canadian premiere. I was duly warned, upon arriving in Montreal that afternoon, that Fantasia is resolutely a people’s festival, which is to say that its spirit resides in the pleasure of the crowd. And certainly a paying audience is free to enjoy whatever delights a film affords them. Horror films, in particular, tend to draw out the boisterous, and I suppose I shouldn’t have been surprised that a room of eager Montrealers could hardly suppress their guffaws. And yet it seemed to me that before a crowd this rowdy, Starry Eyes didn’t stand much of a chance. As the film heaved into action, its seriousness was clearly at odds with the levity the room had anticipated. Nobody cared. The hoots and titters passed through the room like a chill.