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Draft Day (#110 of 2)

The 10 Worst Movie Posters of 2014

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The 10 Worst Movie Posters of 2014
The 10 Worst Movie Posters of 2014

If the best posters of 2014 constitute a vibrant harmony between marketing and product, the worst ones merely amplify the already contemptuous elements present in the films being advertised. Of course, this isn’t always so, as with The Immigrant, which is more a case of the Weinstein Company attempting to market the film as something it blatantly isn’t, but on the whole, these posters are dreadful teases for grievous fare.

Body of Work Kevin Costner, The Grizzled Patriot with a Liam Neeson-Style Comeback

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Body of Work: Kevin Costner, The Grizzled Patriot with a Liam Neeson-Style Comeback

Relativity Media

Body of Work: Kevin Costner, The Grizzled Patriot with a Liam Neeson-Style Comeback

In case you haven’t noticed, Kevin Costner is in the midst of what could be a major career resurgence. Before appearing in this past summer’s Man of Steel, which cast him as Superman’s adoptive father, Jonathan Kent, Costner hadn’t starred in a theatrical feature since 2010’s The Company Men (though he did pop up on the small screen in 2012’s History Channel miniseries Hatfields & McCoys). And before this year’s sudden glut of Costner fare, the actor hadn’t been ubiquitous since the 1990s, a decade that often saw him star in up to three films per year, and one that kicked off with Dances with Wolves, a western that nabbed seven Oscars, including Best Picture and Best Director for Costner.

It’s easy to forget that Costner’s industry high point, at least as far as trophies are concerned, remains a historical frontier adventure, since he largely built his popularity around thrillers and sports movies. And now, it’s only natural that the three films spearheading his comeback are two C.I.A. actioners, Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit and 3 Days to Kill, and Ivan Reitman’s NFL dramedy Draft Day. All to be released before the end of April, the movies reflect Costner’s enduring professional hallmarks, as well as his unceasing ’Merican interests.