House Logo
Explore categories +

Lorde (#110 of 14)

The 10 Most-Read Slant Articles of 2017

Comments Comments (...)

The 10 Most-Read Slant Articles of 2017

Warner Bros.

The 10 Most-Read Slant Articles of 2017

Determining Slant’s most popular articles of the year wasn’t easy. What’s the best measurement of what our readers are most interested in? Time spent on a page isn’t a reliable metric, as evidenced by the leader in that race: page two of the search results for “Visconti.” The articles with the most comments merely reflected the rabidity of a particular fanbase’s obsession with aggregated scores. Ultimately, the ratio between unique and absolute pageviews was relatively consistent, so we opted for the latter. Some of the results took us by surprise: An average star rating led to our most-read—err, looked at—article of the year. And our most popular TV recap was for a mid-season episode of RuPaul’s Drag Race (maybe it was the inclusion of the word “Kardashian” in the title, fodder for my long-ignored suggestion that Slant would be better off covering celebrity gossip). In the end, though, this list comprises most of what we do best: incisive critique of film, TV, and music, awards soothsaying, and—with one of our three-week-old 2017 lists eking its way into the Top 10—listology. Hell, maybe in the next 24 hours, this one will make the cut too. Now that would be meta! Alexa Camp

Listen to Slant’s 25 Best Singles of 2017

Comments Comments (...)

Listen to Slant’s 25 Best Singles of 2017

Brendan Walter

Listen to Slant’s 25 Best Singles of 2017

Even the resilience of retroism was, this year, tinged with the irony of watching those not knowing the past being doomed to repeat it. But in a grasping-at-straws moment, grim reality checks, bubblicious-pop contraptions, stripped-down folk-soul, and, yes, Old Music 2.0 seemed to coexist on a playlist sending signals of life from the Upside Down, or at least one designed to help us feel some type of way. So even though, as our list of the year’s top singles reveals, we more often than not had to travel all the way to Japan and England to satisfy our memories of hip-thrusting better days that we may never see return, the pleasure of the perfect three- or four-minute escape will never be quashed. Though we’re at the point where even Katy Perry knows we’re all metaphorically in chains.

Lorde Brings the Melodrama on New Single & Music Video “Green Light”

Comments Comments (...)

Lorde Brings the Melodrama on New Single & Music Video “Green Light”

Brendan Walter

Lorde Brings the Melodrama on New Single & Music Video “Green Light”

It’s been four years since New Zealand’s Lorde took the pop world by storm at just 16 years old with her hit “Royals.” Since then, the singer-songwriter has laid low aside from a contribution to 2014’s The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1 soundtrack and guest vocals on Disclosure’s 2015 single “Magnets,” a standout from their album Caracal. After teasing her comeback record last week, Lorde has unveiled “Green Light,” the first single from her long-awaited sophomore effort, Melodrama.

Lorde Plays the Femme Fatale in the Music Video for Disclosure’s “Magnets”

Comments Comments (...)

Lorde Plays the Femme Fatale in the Music Video for Disclosure’s “Magnets”
Lorde Plays the Femme Fatale in the Music Video for Disclosure’s “Magnets”

Ella Yelich-O’Connor, better known as 18-year-old New Zealand pop star Lorde, has never been anything less than uncomfortably mature for her age, but her new music video, for Disclosure’s “Magnets,” a standout cut from the U.K. garage duo’s Caracal, transforms the gawky teen into a bona-fide femme fatale. The clip, which premiered today, finds Lorde cavorting with a married man while his meek, buttoned-up, and sometimes bruised wife cautiously prepares his morning coffee and stares blankly out the window of their L.A. manse. “Let’s embrace the point of no return,” Lorde urges as she zombie-struts in her usual way down a glass-encased hallway in a patent-leather trench coat and blood-red lipstick. She gives the wife a knowing glance and pushes the man, tied to a chair, into the pool. Of course, it wouldn’t be a music video if she didn’t also set him on fire. Watch below:

Lorde Unveils the Music Video for “Yellow Flicker Beat,” from The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part I

Comments Comments (...)

Lorde Unveils the Music Video for “Yellow Flicker Beat,” from <em>The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part I</em>
Lorde Unveils the Music Video for “Yellow Flicker Beat,” from <em>The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part I</em>

Pop chanteuse Lorde unveiled the music video for “Yellow Flicker Beat,” the lead single from the soundtrack to The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part I, which she also curated. In a message posted on her website, the New Zealand singer, who turned 18 today, says “Yellow Flicker Beat” is “about katniss [sic] realizing that things have crossed a line, about being pushed to the edge and right over it.” She describes her character in the video, directed by Emily Kai Bock, as “a shapeshifter, full of intensity and impulse.” Though Lorde can come off as awkward and slightly unhinged during public appearances, there’s an elegance and sophistication to her performance here. As for the song itself, it’s sonically darker, more dramatic, and fleshed out than the minimalist pop songs on her debut, Pure Heroine, befitting an epic blockbuster franchise like The Hunger Games.

Grammy 2014 Winner Predictions: Record of the Year

Comments Comments (...)

Grammy 2014 Winner Predictions: Record of the Year

Andrew Whitton/High Rise PR

Grammy 2014 Winner Predictions: Record of the Year

NARAS’s manifesto says the Academy will choose Record of the Year based on artistry alone, “without regard to sales or chart position.” This promise gets easier to keep as the Grammys get older: This year, all five contenders are commercial smashes, and, perhaps equally important, all five singles are equally at home on pop radio and hipster-party playlists. Predicting this category with any certainty would be simply insincere, especially if, say, voters decide to award Daft Punk’s banner year here and not in Album of the Year. Bruno Mars has the Super Bowl halftime show, Robin Thicke still has that suit with the slimming vertical pinstripes, and Pharrell—nominated twice here, for his work with Thicke and Daft Punk—has already enjoyed a hell of a Grammy season while the rest of us were still putting our socks on.