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Sunday Bloody Sunday (#110 of 2)

50 Essential LGBT Films

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50 Essential LGBT Films
50 Essential LGBT Films

You’ve sported a red equal sign on Facebook, watched Nancy Pelosi show Michele Bachmann her politically correct middle finger, and read some of those other lists that have compiled lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) films, hailing usual suspects like High Art and Brokeback Mountain as gay equivalents of Vertigo (oh, don’t Citizen Kane me; we’re talking regime upheaval here). Now, as you continue to celebrate the crushing of DOMA and Prop 8 (and toss some extra confetti for Pride Month while you’re at it), peruse Slant’s own list of LGBT movies you owe it to yourself to see. Curated by co-founder and film editor Ed Gonzalez, this 50-wide roster is a singular trove of queer-themed gems and classics, spanning the past eight decades and reflecting artists as diverse as Kenneth Anger, Derek Jarman, and Rainer Werner Fassbinder. You won’t find The Birdcage among our ranks, but you will find Paul Morrissey’s Trash, Ira Sach’s The Delta, David Lynch’s Mulholland Drive, and Céline Sciamma’s Tomboy. Consider the list a hat tip to what’s shaped up to be a banner LGBT year, particularly on screen, with lesbian romance Blue Is the Warmest Color taking top honors at Cannes, and Xavier Dolan releasing the masterful Laurence Anyways, which also made our cut. R. Kurt Osenlund

5 for the Day: Glenda Jackson

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5 for the Day: Glenda Jackson
5 for the Day: Glenda Jackson

Retired from stage and screen since 1992, when she entered into British politics and was voted Labour MP for Hampstead and Highgate in the London borough of Camden, Glenda Jackson must be the only member of Parliament to have had her nipples suckled by Oliver Reed (then again, Reed did drink to excess, so who knows for sure?). Jackson’s film career took off when she won her first best actress Oscar for Women in Love (1970); her competition that year actually included Ali MacGraw in Love Story, so this first win is understandable, though her second best actress win, for a joyless sex comedy called A Touch of Class (1973), is much less explicable. Then again, Jackson’s stardom in the early seventies has its inexplicable sides: has any other actress made such an impact on screen by purveying nearly nothing but abrasive bad temper? In film after film, Jackson carped, sniped, bitched, moaned, barked and howled at her leading men and her audience, but there would be moments when she let us see glimpses of a wounded adolescent defensiveness in her moody, pockmarked face, with its mistrustful eyes and disagreeably pouting mouth, and at moments like these she could be touching, if the role required it.