House Logo
Explore categories +

Andrew Garfield (#110 of 10)

Watch the First Trailer for David Robert Mitchell’s Under the Silver Lake Starring Andrew Garfield and Riley Keough

Comments Comments (...)

Watch the First Trailer for David Robert Mitchell’s Under the Silver Lake Starring Andrew Garfield and Riley Keough

A24

Watch the First Trailer for David Robert Mitchell’s Under the Silver Lake Starring Andrew Garfield and Riley Keough

Four years after the release of his breakout It Follows, David Robert Mitchell is back with Under the Silver Lake, which is described by A24 as “a delirious neo-noir fever dream about one man’s search for the truth behind the mysterious crimes, murders, and disappearances in his East L.A. neighborhood.” Today, the distributor released the first trailer for the film, which stars Andrew Garfield as Sam, a disenchanted thirtysomething who embarks on a quest across Los Angeles to find the woman, Sarah (played by Riley Keough), who he one day discovers in his apartment’s swimming pool.

Oscar 2017 Winner Predictions Actor

Comments Comments (...)

Oscar 2017 Winner Predictions: Actor

Roadside Attractions

Oscar 2017 Winner Predictions: Actor

Maybe it’s a symptom of living life in the age of Donald Trump that today’s Oscar prediction article is more than two sentences long. We’re all getting used to keeping our sanity in check on a strictly day-by-day basis, convinced that every single new development and how we react to it represents the moment that’s going to seal our fate in history books alongside German hausfraus circa 1933. How else to explain why we’re now wavering ever so slightly in our confidence that Casey Affleck will take home the Oscar, simply because Denzel Washington pulled a shocker by winning the SAG award?

Watch the Trailer for Martin Scorsese’s 28-Years-in-the-Making Epic Silence

Comments Comments (...)

Watch the Trailer for Martin Scorsese’s 28-Years-in-the-Making Epic Silence

Paramount Pictures

Watch the Trailer for Martin Scorsese’s 28-Years-in-the-Making Epic Silence

“I pray but I’m lost, am I just praying to silence?” Said words are being used by Paramount to promote the release of Martin Scorsese’s Silence, but they could just as easily apply to the filmmaker’s drive to get the film made. A two-decades-in-the-making passion project for the auteur, the film is the second adaptation of the Shūsaku Endō novel of the same name, previously adapted in 1971 by Masahiro Shinoda. It relates the story of two Christian missionaries (Andrew Garfield and Adam Driver) who venture to Japan, in the ultimate test of faith, to search of their missing mentor (Liam Neeson), at a time when Christianity was outlawed and their presence forbidden.

Oscar 2011 Winner Predictions Actor

Comments Comments (...)

Oscar 2011 Winner Predictions: Actor
Oscar 2011 Winner Predictions: Actor

This ought to be chapter three in a series of prediction entries no longer than the amount of time it takes the orchestra to cut off the acceptance speeches of the winners in the short film categories. If you don’t think Colin Firth is taking this one with, if anything, even more ease than Jeff Bridges coasted to his win last year, then you may as well put your money down on Hailee Steinfeld winning this category in a shock upset. Because she has as good a shot as at least two of the nominees that actually have a penis and roles nearly as central as hers. Not that being attached to a penis matters quite so much as being attached to a Best Picture nominee, especially one that recently all but swept the BAFTAs. A number of pundits have already pointed out, in comparing Firth’s easy win here against Annette Bening’s increasingly uphill battle to reach endgame over in Best Actress, how AMPAS continues to think that men age like fine wine and that women spoil faster than leaky, raw chicken breast tenders in a Styrofoam tray. Firth’s emerging worry lines and crow’s feet are as much to account for his easy win as his affected stammer as the emotionally crippled King Bertie, and the presence of a couple of actors whose youth and charisma make Oscar feel all funny in his special area only underline Firth’s win. (For that matter, you might say Firth’s Oscar chances last year weren’t so much dashed by Bridges’s battles with the bottle as they were by Tom Ford’s taste in men, culled from the very same smoldering age bracket Oscar simply can’t stomach.) Jesse Eisenberg managed to ride the coattails of what was once considered an Oscar juggernaut, and James Franco’s extracurricular bid to snatch the title once held by James Brown. But Ryan Gosling and Andrew Garfield learned the hard way that the Academy is truly No Country for Young Twinks, just as Firth will now have to come to terms with the notion that his time as the thinking woman’s sex symbol may not extend much longer beyond the time it takes to say, “I’d like to thank the Academy.”

Oscar 2011 Nomination Predictions: Actor in a Supporting Role

Comments Comments (...)

Oscar 2011 Nomination Predictions: Actor in a Supporting Role
Oscar 2011 Nomination Predictions: Actor in a Supporting Role

Javier Bardem, Heath Ledger, Christoph Waltz. Though the template for winning a Best Supporting Actor Oscar these days seems to require leaving a body count inversely proportional to the average age of a typical Best Actress winner, this year’s slate of contenders indicates voters are ready to see the men behind the monsters. The prime case in point: Andrew Garfield’s turn as The Social Network’s spurned and spat-upon baby entrepreneur Eduardo Saverin, which has glided past Justin Timberlake’s showier antics as Napster-teer Sean Parker and Armie Hammer’s equally compelling double dip as the Winklevii twins to emerge as the sole boy from his film’s well-tanked fraternity to contend here—especially on the strength of his Golden Globe nod. Okay, he does pull a sick, Joker-worthy stunt on a chicken, but off screen. Otherwise, David Fincher devotes most of Garfield’s screen time to chopping onions under his big, brown puppy-dog eyes. (Never mind reports that the man he represents on screen is reportedly nearly as misrepresented as Mark Zuckerberg, in the precise opposite direction.)

Tribeca Film Festival 2008: Boy A

Comments Comments (...)

Tribeca Film Festival 2008: <em>Boy A</em>
Tribeca Film Festival 2008: <em>Boy A</em>

The past is a terrible secret that can’t be suppressed in Boy A. The means by which Intermission director John Crowley and writer Mark O’Rowe (working from Jonathan Trigell’s novel) dramatize one man’s efforts to conceal a skeleton in the closet, however, too often takes the form of convenient coincidences and tidy echoes. In England, a man is released from juvenile prison after an adolescence of incarceration with a new name, Jack (Andrew Garfield), a new flat and job at a delivery company, and the support of devoted guidance counselor Terry (Peter Mullan). Jack was confined years earlier for killing—along with a delinquent friend—a young girl, and as Crowley’s understated, evocative use of constricting doorways, hallways, and bridges indicate, he remains emotionally and psychologically imprisoned by this heinous crime. Upon reentering society, Jack finds himself a best mate in Chris (Shaun Evans) and a feisty girlfriend in Michelle (Katie Lyons), a hopeful turn of events that the crushingly grim tone makes clear will be fleeting. It is, but not before the filmmakers have indulged in flashbacks to Jack’s youth that tidily mirror the present-day action, an example of artificial structural neatness that extends to the calamitous tension that arises out of Terry’s dueling devotion to both surrogate son Jack and his own wayward biological boy. By shrouding first the what, and then the how and why, of Jack’s misdeed (which is never fully shown or explicated), the film dishonestly courts our empathy through sheer denial of key facts, a situation that eventually breeds inescapable suspicion regarding the sympathy granted Jack by the story. Garfield embodies his protagonist with a tremulousness that evokes guilt, shame, fear, and alienation from the culture into which he’s now been thrust, his reticent mannerisms bestowing Jack with a fragility that’s most endearing during intimate moments with Michelle. For all its sensitivity, thoughtful sobriety, and sound performances, though, Boy A finally permits itself an excessive number of contrived and/or clichéd gestures, so that the sneakers Jack receives from Terry upon entry into the world are “Nike Escapes,” his euphoria is expressed via ecstasy-fueled nightclub dancing, and— clunkiest of all—his climactic destination on a train is “the end of the line.”

Boy A @ the Tribeca Film Festival

This blog entry was originally published on Slant Magazine on the date above.