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Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World (#110 of 6)

On the Rise Brie Larson

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On the Rise: Brie Larson

Cinedigm

On the Rise: Brie Larson

If nothing else, 23-year-old Brie Larson exemplifies a trend within her generation of rising stars, who weave in and out of each other’s projects like they’re breathlessly party-hopping. In The Spectacular Now, Larson plays Cassidy, the ex-girlfriend of a reluctant hero played by 26-year-old Miles Teller, who’ll soon star in Divergent with 21-year-old Shailene Woodley, who’s also in The Spectacular Now, and is shooting The Fault in Our Stars (written by—what?—the guys who wrote The Spectacular Now). The new teen romance also features 28-year-old Mary Elizabeth Winstead, who played opposite Larson in Scott Pilgrim vs. The World, and 16-year-old Kaitlyn Dever, who’ll soon be seen with Larson in the forthcoming Short Term 12. Additionally, Short Term 12 features 29-year-old John Gallagher Jr., who stars on The Newsroom with 27-year-old Allison Pill, who’s also a Scott Pilgrim vs. The World alum. It’s all enough to spin the head of six-degrees king Kevin Bacon, who, come to think of it, just saw his signature movie, Footloose, remade with—wait for it—Miles Teller.

SXSW 2011: Love Shines

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SXSW 2011: Love Shines

Paperny Films

SXSW 2011: Love Shines

With his shaggy, unkempt hair and the blue-black circles under his heavy-lidded eyes, Ron Sexsmith projects a hangdog image throughout Love Shines, director Douglas Arrowsmith’s chronicle of the singer-songwriter’s bumpy career arc. Though he is at turns candid and insightful when addressing Arrowsmith’s camera directly, Sexsmith simply comes across as deeply sad here, and, rather than casting him as an underdog in the youth- and image-driven music industry, that gloom just makes Love Shines a dire ordeal.

The recording of Sexsmith’s latest album, the workmanlike and pleasant Long Player Late Bloomer, serves as a loose framing device for the film, and, in an interview prior to its release, Sexsmith described the album’s relatively upbeat tone as the “action movie” to the “Lars von Trier films” of his earlier work. Love Shines may not be as punishing as Dogville, but it’s a long way from Scott Pilgrim vs. the World.

Lichman and Rizov “Live” at Grassroots Tavern: Season 5, Episode 4, “Vadim Rizov’s Bram Stoker’s Dracula”

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Lichman and Rizov “Live” at Grassroots Tavern: Season 5, Episode 4, “Vadim Rizov’s Bram Stoker’s Dracula”
Lichman and Rizov “Live” at Grassroots Tavern: Season 5, Episode 4, “Vadim Rizov’s Bram Stoker’s Dracula”

Hello Michigan!

Summer is officially over and all the kids are going back to school. Such is the case with friend of the podcast Akiva Gottlieb, who is off to make Ann Arbor his new home for some graduate program in thermonuclear dynamics and relating to Eric Rohmer. I’m not really sure.

But before that we discuss the nature of geographic cinema—in that how does one leaving New York for Michigan and continue to watch rep cinema? Do they wait for an IFC release to trickle out there, or do they resort to the Internet and torrenting? Does such a thing upset a director, as we ask Preston Miller (God’s Land), whose movie will play at the Buffalo Film Festival next month.

On the DL August 2010

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On the DL: August 2010
On the DL: August 2010

For many years, downloadable games have been viewed as nice little distractions when compared to their retail brethren. However, with these games increasing in sophistication year after year, more consumers are beginning to discover the joys of a lean eight-hour experience over a retail release with a 60-plus-hour playtime. So, with this monthly feature, we hope to shine a light on a few downloadable titles, from various platforms, that have impressed us in the past month.

A Movie a Day, Day 91: Scott Pilgrim vs. the World

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A Movie a Day, Day 91: <em>Scott Pilgrim vs. the World</em>
A Movie a Day, Day 91: <em>Scott Pilgrim vs. the World</em>

If Inception is a video game that becomes interactive only after it’s over, when you compare notes with other fans, Scott Pilgrim vs. the World is a video game you watch someone else play. That might not sound like much fun, but this movie is an upper, thanks to its inventive video game/cartoon visuals, crisp editing and constant stream of wry observational barbs.

Director Edgar Wright found his own way to animate the black-and-white graphic novels his movie is based on, adding bright colors but keeping a comic-book look. Figures are frequently silhouetted or shot in very bright or dark lighting, and cartoonish graphics often pop up on the screen, like the “Yeah Yeah Yeahs” and lightning bolts that emanate from Scott’s band when they play; the pink hearts that float up from their lips as he kisses Ramona, the girl of his dreams; and the way the snow melts in Ramona’s wake as she rollerblades down Toronto sidewalks. The dreamlike editing helps too, as characters move from one setting to another without comment or cuts, the conversation or background music simply continuing as the background changes.