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American Horror Story: Cult Recap Episode 8, “Winter of Our Discontent”

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American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 8, “Winter of Our Discontent”
American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 8, “Winter of Our Discontent”

In “Winter of Our Discontent,” Kai Anderson (Evan Peters) is shown in flashbacks as an online troll, a hero to the oppressed, and a savvy manipulator, all before being reduced to a bumbling, petulant clown, a punching bag for an outraged, exasperated, and imprisoned Beverly Hope (Adina Porter) to rail against. “You’re a fake,” she tells him. “You don’t stand for a goddamn thing.” The tracing of the trajectory of Kai’s life throughout the latest episode of American Horror Story: Cult is close to coherent, but we’ve known as early as the season’s first episode, “Election Night,” when he painted his face orange with crushed Cheetos, what—or, rather, who—this young man is supposed to represent. What you probably didn’t expect is that Ally Mayfair-Richards (Sarah Paulson), who’s been terrorized by Kai’s cult for months, would one day become part of his inner circle.

G.B.F. Director Darren Stein and Star Michael J. Willet On Whiz-Bang Dialogue, Growing Up Gay, and Why Their Film Was Unfairly Handed an R Rating

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<em>G.B.F.</em> Director Darren Stein and Star Michael J. Willet On Whiz-Bang Dialogue, Growing Up Gay, and Why Their Film Was Unfairly Handed an R Rating
<em>G.B.F.</em> Director Darren Stein and Star Michael J. Willet On Whiz-Bang Dialogue, Growing Up Gay, and Why Their Film Was Unfairly Handed an R Rating

According to G.B.F., a hip teen comedy that fires zingers like a taser, throws more shade than a sugar maple, and opens in select cities and on VOD platforms today, the hottest new popular-girl accessory is the titular arm candy: the Gay Best Friend. Starring Michael J. Willett in the lead role of Tanner (above), a closeted high-schooler who, once-outed, becomes a must-have for every status-seeking female classmate, the movie leads with the idea of teen gayness as a positive, while also exploring Tanner’s exploitation in a manner true to ye olde clique-filled youth comedies. Brimming with zeitgeisty one-liners, G.B.F. feels fresh, yet it also feels like it should have been made years ago—like, say, when director Darren Stein made Jawbreaker in 1999. It’d be wrong to say we haven’t come a long way since then, but, with G.B.F. being handed an undue R rating, allegedly for its gayness, it’s clear we’ve hardly come far enough.