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Lesley Manville (#110 of 3)

Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread Gets First Trailer and Poster

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Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread Gets First Trailer and Poster

Focus Features

Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread Gets First Trailer and Poster

The trailer for Paul Thomas Anderson’s eighth feature-length film dropped less than 30 minutes ago and cinephiles are already frothing at the mouth. Phantom Thread marks Anderson’s second collaboration with Daniel Day-Lewis, who announced earlier this year that he would retire from acting after the release of the film. The three-time Oscar winner has also stated that working on the film caused him to dream of a second career in fashion.

New York Film Festival 2010: Another Year

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New York Film Festival 2010: <em>Another Year</em>
New York Film Festival 2010: <em>Another Year</em>

Another Year is a tale of haves and have-nots—those who are touched by grace and those who are not. In collaboration with a gifted group of actors he’s been working with for years, director Mike Leigh illuminates the gap between life’s haunted loners and those lucky enough to be able to form deep and long-lasting relationships.

At the center of the story are Tom (Jim Broadbent) and Gerri (Ruth Sheen), a loving couple whose warmth and ease—with themselves, with each other, and with other people—makes them and their cozy home a magnet for their longtime friends, particularly Gerri’s workmate Mary (Lesley Manville), a nervous wreck who tries to camouflage her crippling anxiety with torrents of chitchat.

Cannes Film Festival 2010: Exodus: Burnt by the Sun 2 and Award Predictions

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Cannes Film Festival 2010: <em>Exodus: Burnt by the Sun 2</em> and Award Predictions
Cannes Film Festival 2010: <em>Exodus: Burnt by the Sun 2</em> and Award Predictions

The Cannes Film Festival ended with its longest competition title, and it wasn’t even a complete film. Nikita Mikhalkov Exodus: Burnt by the Sun 2 should, in fact, be called Exodus: Burnt by the Sun 2: Part 1, since what was screened was just one half of the final project. Exodus is essentially two and a half hours of Colonel Kotov (Mikhalkov) trudging through WWII battle zones to reunite with his daughter Nadya (Nadezhda Mikhalkova, the director’s real-life offspring) without making very much progress at all. (Yes, I know a title card at the end of Burnt by the Sun says that Kotov and his entire family were executed. The film deals with that by announcing that it was, basically, a filing error.)

When Nazis attack the prison camp in which Kotov is held, he escapes, eventually joining up with other Russian soldiers to trek across the country while avoiding being killed. Meanwhile, his daughter does, well, pretty much the exact same thing, except she flees from a Soviet school. Mikhalkov, being a larger-than-life nationalist psychopath, doesn’t half-ass anything. The entire movie is nonstop bombast, with huge battles, epic widescreen vistas, silent-film performances, and one of the most absolutely ridiculous scores I’ve ever heard in a movie. It can be very funny (largely because Mikhalkov clearly doesn’t mean any of it as comedy), but it’s mostly just exhausting, especially once the movie ends with Kotov and his daughter just as far apart as they were to begin with, and you realize that nothing you just watched mattered at all. I’m sure it will all be resolved in Exodus: Burnt by the Sun 2: Part 2, but I can’t exactly say I’m counting down the days to find out.