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Grizzly Bear (#110 of 4)

House Playlist Dum Dum Girls, Emily Jane White featuring Marissa Nadler, Katy B, Earth House Hold, LIZ, Grizzly Bear, Mogwai, & Dubbel Dutch

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House Playlist: Dum Dum Girls, Emily Jane White featuring Marissa Nadler, Katy B, Earth House Hold, LIZ, Grizzly Bear, Mogwai, & Dubbel Dutch

Jimmy Fontaine/Sub Pop

House Playlist: Dum Dum Girls, Emily Jane White featuring Marissa Nadler, Katy B, Earth House Hold, LIZ, Grizzly Bear, Mogwai, & Dubbel Dutch

Dum Dum Girls, “Lost Boys and Girls Club”: Co-produced by the Raveonettes’ Sune Rose Wagner, the scuzzy pop track “Lost Boys and Girls Club” is the first taste of Dum Dum Girls’ forthcoming album, Too True, the full-length follow-up to last year’s End of Daze EP. The album drops January 27th.

Bonnaroo 2013 Photo Diary Grizzly Bear, Wilco, Of Monsters and Men, ZZ Top, & the Fouls

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Bonnaroo 2013 Photo Diary: Grizzly Bear, Wilco, Of Monsters and Men, ZZ Top, & the Fouls
Bonnaroo 2013 Photo Diary: Grizzly Bear, Wilco, Of Monsters and Men, ZZ Top, & the Fouls

Photographer Chris Jorgensen has set up shot at Bonnaroo, a four-day, multi-stage music and arts festival held on a 700-acre farm in Manchester, Tennessee. Each day we’ll be posting some of his up-close-and-personal shots of the bands, the fans, and the press events. And check out Bonnaroo’s live social webcast schedule here.

House Playlist: Grizzly Bear, Frank Ocean, Peaking Lights, & Recloose

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House Playlist: Grizzly Bear, Frank Ocean, Peaking Lights, & Recloose

Warp Records

House Playlist: Grizzly Bear, Frank Ocean, Peaking Lights, & Recloose

Grizzly Bear, “Sleeping Ute.” After three years of hibernation (and a spate of solo projects), Grizzly Bear has finally emerged to bring us the first cut off Veckatimest’s long-awaited and still nameless follow-up. “Sleeping Ute,” a sinuous Daniel Rossen composition, begins with a muscular riff that momentarily tricks its listeners into thinking the band has suddenly remade themselves into a swampy blues outfit. A few measures later, though, that notion is laid to rest when the band conjures up a myriad of other sounds, as if they’d ransacked a special-effects room. The real pleasure comes about three minutes in, when all that cacophony drops out except for a classical guitar and Rossen pleads, “I can’t help myself.” Indeed. Manan Desai

 

Cannes Film Festival 2010: Of Gods and Men, My Joy, & Blue Valentine

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Cannes Film Festival 2010: <em>Of Gods and Men</em>, <em>My Joy</em>, & <em>Blue Valentine</em>
Cannes Film Festival 2010: <em>Of Gods and Men</em>, <em>My Joy</em>, & <em>Blue Valentine</em>

The true story of seven French monks in Northern Africa who in 1996 were kidnapped and murdered by Islamic extremists, Xavier Beauvois’s in-competition Of Gods and Men is, no more and no less, a handsomely mounted French prestige picture. Never less than perfectly competent, it’s still somber and respectful to a fault: the Cannes equivalent of Oscar bait.

Beauvois models his film’s rhythm on the monastic life, and a few moments in the monastery toward the beginning of the film have a similar meditative rhythm as Philip Gröning’s marvelous Into Great Silence. But that comparison soon falls apart, as Beauvois is less interested in humanizing the monks (played by an experienced cast of French actors that includes Lambert Wilson and Michael Lonsdale) than in sanctifying them.

Their sacrifice—despite orders from the military to return to France, the monks stay in Africa, knowing full well they will probably not survive—may indeed have been a noble one, in keeping with their commitments to their community and their faith, but it can’t have been an easy one to make. But with the exception of a few scenes of the monks discussing the decision, we never actually see them struggle with the choice. Beauvois treats them as nobly suffering martyrs rather than as human beings, a fundamentally anti-dramatic choice that renders their decision a foregone conclusion and prevents Of Gods and Men from carrying anything close to the spiritual weight Beauvois intends.