House Logo
Explore categories +

Jon Favreau (#110 of 5)

Watch the First Trailer for Martin Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street

Comments Comments (...)

Watch the First Trailer for Martin Scorsese’s <em>The Wolf of Wall Street</em>
Watch the First Trailer for Martin Scorsese’s <em>The Wolf of Wall Street</em>

Continuing to show a late-career hunger for genre experimentation, Martin Scorsese follows his highly-decorated 3D fantasy Hugo with The Wolf of Wall Street, a brash, rise-and-fall stock-market satire that seems to boast more comedy than the filmmaker’s typical hard-hitting drama. Marking Scorsese’s fifth collaboration with leading man Leonardo DiCaprio (who, with this and The Great Gatsby, is officially cinema’s devil-may-care party-thrower of 2013), the new film is based on the memoir of Jordan Belfort, an infamous money launderer whose Wall Street wheeling and dealings also inspired 2000’s Boiler Room. Hard, fast, and just about out of control, this debut trailer suggests Scorsese is on an energetic high, nervy and playful and ready to unleash something topical and evocative (what, no Michael Douglas cameo?). Opening November 15, The Wolf of Wall Street co-stars Kyle Chandler, Jean Dujardin, Jon Favreau, Rob Reiner, Pan Am head-turner Margot Robbie, and also Jonah Hill and Matthew McConaughey. Oscar watchers should probably add the latter two gents to their Supporting Actor shortlists, and the film is poised to contend in other categories too. Get a load of Marty and Leo’s latest after the jump.

15 Famous Movie Phone Calls

Comments Comments (...)

15 Famous Movie Phone Calls
15 Famous Movie Phone Calls

Budding blonde Ari Graynor continues the R-rated femme comedy trend this weekend in For a Good Time, Call…, a naughty film that pairs the funny gal with brunette Lauren Miller (otherwise known as Mrs. Seth Rogen). Inspired by Miller’s college exploits with roommate and co-writer Katie Ann Naylon, the movie casts the leading pair as sparring roomies turned phone sex operators, a scenario that soon proves especially lucrative. Phones may have undergone a lot of makeovers in recent years, but their effectiveness on screen has been solid since the days of the candlestick model. In honor of the new fantasy-fulfilling comedy’s basis in ring-a-ding-ding, we’ve gathered up 15 films with highly memorable phone calls, which run the gamut from disarming to terrifying.

Critical Distance: The Avengers

Comments Comments (...)

Critical Distance: <em>The Avengers</em>
Critical Distance: <em>The Avengers</em>

For 10 years, comic-book superheroes have permeated popular movies. After the mega-success of Spider-Man in 2002, costumed white fellas saving the world became multiplex staples. Once all the iconic heroes were accounted for, studios found continued success with second-tier characters, from the previously obscure (Iron Man) to the uncomfortably jingoistic (Captain America: The First Avenger). The circuit escalated into the late 2000s, spawning remakes, reboots, sequels, and prequels with a frequency that only the most ardent fans could keep up with. A few X-Men spinoffs, a Superman hybrid, and two Hulk films later, we now arrive at a moment of superhero saturation, wherein each new release affirms the general consensus that these films represent a creatively dry enterprise.

Comics Column #5B The Fragrance of Nostalgia (20th Century Boys)

Comments Comments (...)

Comics Column #5B: The Fragrance of Nostalgia (20th Century Boys)
Comics Column #5B: The Fragrance of Nostalgia (20th Century Boys)

I want to talk about an interesting comic book movie today, but first I guess I should talk about Iron Man 2.

“Doing too little with too much.”

In the third installment of this column, I said this about Jon Favreau’s first Iron Man film:

Iron Man Love for Robert Downey Jr.

Comments Comments (...)

<em>Iron Man</em> Love for Robert Downey Jr.
<em>Iron Man</em> Love for Robert Downey Jr.

Shining through here as ever, Iron Man confirms that Robert Downey Jr. is, like his director Jon Favreau, a comedian and entertainer at heart. For all the great-looking effects and gadget-cool of this superhero movie, it’s Downey and his charisma (to say that very heart) that drive and sustain this picture. Indeed, it’s a film about, in a very literal way, Downey’s heart: his commitment to his particular brand (we might say his art) of acting. Downey is middle-aged so—while this is an origin story for a comic book franchise-at-stake—this is also, in the light and fashion of Hollywood, an evaluation of a career, one already celebrated, and primed for reinvention; or, better, reassertion.