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David Fincher Netflix Series Mindhunter with Jonathan Groff Gets Trailer

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David Fincher Netflix Series Mindhunter with Jonathan Groff Gets Trailer

Netflix

David Fincher Netflix Series Mindhunter with Jonathan Groff Gets Trailer

“How do we get ahead of crazy if we don’t know how crazy thinks?” So says the F.B.I. agent played by Holt McCallany at the end of the teaser trailer for the Netflix series Mindhunter. For David Fincher, the show will be yet another opportunity for the filmmaker to return to the scene of his first cinematic triumph: the serial-killer genre. The series, which will also be directed by Asif Kapadia, Tobias Lindholm, and Andrew Douglas, and is executive produced by Fincher, Joshua Donen, Charlize Theron, and Cean Chaffin, concerns the investigative odyssey conducted by two F.B.I. agents (played by McCallany and Jonathan Groff) to “discover the brutal answers.”

Looking Recap Season 2, Episode 10, "Looking for Home"

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Looking Recap: Season 2, Episode 10, “Looking for Home”

HBO

Looking Recap: Season 2, Episode 10, “Looking for Home”

The season finale of Looking culminates in a single, extended take, perhaps three minutes in all, at the end of a lovers’ quarrel. From the confines of an elevator, the camera follows Patrick (Jonathan Groff) and Kevin (Russell Tovey) down a concrete corridor and into the fluorescent glare of a parking garage, pausing and picking up again as the argument tumbles toward its crescendo. The scene, near the end of a narrative arc in which HBO’s unassuming dramedy emerged as one of the best shows on television, is a fitting vision of the halting, awkward paths we follow into adulthood—regret-ridden, perhaps, but also, as Patrick remarks earlier, “oddly liberat[ing].” Despite the tight quarters, it breathes, in part because the episode suggests, aesthetically and thematically, the relief that comes with knowing it won’t all work out as expected. Indeed, with “Looking for Home,” Looking sticks the landing on a brilliant season by dredging up its every disappointment, its every raw detail, recalling the line from Joan Didion’s “Goodbye to All That”: “That was the year, my 28th, when I was discovering that not all of the promises would be kept, that some things are in fact irrevocable and that it had counted after all, every evasion and every procrastination, every word, all of it.”

Looking Recap Season 2, Episode 9, "Looking for Sanctuary"

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Looking Recap: Season 2, Episode 9, “Looking for Sanctuary”

HBO

Looking Recap: Season 2, Episode 9, “Looking for Sanctuary”

Arguing in her claustrophobic bedroom midway through “Looking for Sanctuary,” Doris (Lauren Weedman) and Dom (Murray Bartlett) bump up against the subject at the heart of this season of Looking, which is the frightening notion that there’s no age at which we’ll have it all figured out—that “looking” is, in the final estimation, just another word for “living.” “We’re both damaged,” she says, after a dispute over money escalates into a cruel confrontation with the fact that they’re no longer in their 20s. “We don’t know how to be adults…We’re a codependent mess, a fag and his hag.” It’s here, in “Looking for Sanctuary,” that the series finally admits to a certain cyclicality, as the characters embark on or abandon their own codependent messes, no longer assured, if they ever were, that there comes a point when the looking stops.

Looking Recap Season 2, Episode 8, "Looking for Glory"

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Looking Recap: Season 2, Episode 8, “Looking for Glory”

HBO

Looking Recap: Season 2, Episode 8, “Looking for Glory”

“When Brad broke up with Jennifer, he didn’t have to let people know he was fucking Angelina straight away,” Kevin (Russell Tovey) says to Patrick (Jonathan Groff) near the beginning of “Looking for Glory.” “There was a courtesy gap.” The question of how much time must pass before one acknowledges the collateral damage caused by relationships severed and forged is at the center of tonight’s Looking, an episode in which each character’s evolution this season begins to upset the balance they’ve clung to through years of stasis. Is the “courtesy gap” a way of protecting the potential victims of our shifting desires, or is it a way of avoiding the fact that we must inevitably change, often far more than we bargained for?

Looking Recap Season 2, Episode 7, "Looking for a Plot"

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Looking Recap: Season 2, Episode 7, “Looking for a Plot”

HBO

Looking Recap: Season 2, Episode 7, “Looking for a Plot”

Though Looking is a series rightly known for its rather frank discussions and depictions of sex, it’s also finely attuned to the rhythms of friendship—the type of affection at the center of “Looking for a Plot.” The focused three-hander, which finds Patrick (Jonathan Groff), Dom (Murray Bartlett), and Doris (Lauren Weedman) in Modesto for her father’s funeral, lends new meaning to Katrina and the Waves’ “Walking on Sunshine,” piped onto the empty, glittering dance floor of a Modesto gay bar known as the Brave Bull. “I used to think maybe you loved me,” we hear, as the main trio lets loose the night before the burial. “Now, baby, I’m sure.”

Looking Recap Season 2, Episode 6, "Looking for Gordon Freeman"

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Looking Recap: Season 2, Episode 6, “Looking for Gordon Freeman”

HBO

Looking Recap: Season 2, Episode 6, “Looking for Gordon Freeman”

In honor of perhaps the most excruciating Halloween bash ever thrown, a drunken disaster of karaoke sign-up sheets, PrEP shaming, and sloppy sexual advances that culminates in a meltdown so embarrassing I watched it through my fingers, let’s pour one out for Patrick (Jonathan Groff), the victim of his own unreasonable expectations. “Looking for Gordon Freeman” finds him dressed as the titular video-game character, determined to become a “fun gay,” though in an episode chock-full of extratextual allusions, the one that lands hardest is the least current. “If it’s any consolation,” Agustín (Frankie J. Álvarez) says after Patrick’s flameout, “there was only one suicide during Clarissa Dalloway’s party.”

Looking Recap Season 2, Episode 5, "Looking for Truth"

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Looking Recap: Season 2, Episode 5, “Looking for Truth”

HBO

Looking Recap: Season 2, Episode 5, “Looking for Truth”

In last season’s “Looking for the Future,” the episode that transformed Looking from a muddled collage of character sketches into a lovely, harmonious portrait of three men struggling to grow up in the midst of adulthood, Patrick (Jonathan Groff) and Richie (Raúl Castillo) amble through Golden Gate Park toward Land’s End, discovering the seeds of their romance in the process. The water that has passed under the bridge in the time since is the subject of “Looking for Truth,” a beautiful companion piece to “Looking for the Future”: It has the feeling of a first date, but ends with a reckoning, run through with the conviction that we can never really leave the past behind us.

Looking Recap Season 2, Episode 4, "Looking Down the Road"

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Looking Recap: Season 2, Episode 4, “Looking Down the Road”

HBO

Looking Recap: Season 2, Episode 4, “Looking Down the Road”

In what amounts to something of a departure for Looking, “Looking Down the Road” picks up where “Looking Top to Bottom” left off, on the morning after Patrick (Jonathan Groff) and Kevin (Russell Tovey) spend the night at the former’s apartment. The episodes, both directed by Ryan Fleck, fit together as snugly as adjoining pieces in a jigsaw puzzle. “Looking Down the Road” offers fitful glimpses of the previous episode’s eroticism (like Kevin in his skivvies and a kitschy apron serving “a proper English fry-up”), but it lingers on a sense of romantic disenchantment at which “Looking Top to Bottom” only nodded. “What the heart wants is never quite so flexible,” I said then, but even I was unprepared for just how brittle the heart would turn out to be.

Looking Recap Season 2, Episode 3, "Looking Top to Bottom"

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Looking Recap: Season 2, Episode 3, “Looking Top to Bottom”

HBO

Looking Recap: Season 2, Episode 3, “Looking Top to Bottom”

Tops, bottoms, douches, enemas, rim jobs, “hot shower orgies,” and even a swinging dick or two: Tonight’s episode of Looking, written by John Hoffman and directed by Ryan Fleck, is all about the pleasures of sex and its most irksome complications. Hell, even Doris (Lauren Weedman) lands a big one. The series has never shied away from frank treatments of the subject (the pilot opened with Jonathan Groff’s Patrick cruising in the woods), but “Looking Top to Bottom” addresses the physical and emotional logistics of fooling around with newfound confidence. It’s unafraid of desire, and of the melancholic moments that often accompany its fulfillment.

Looking Recap Season 2, Episode 2, "Looking for Results"

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Looking Recap: Season 2, Episode 2, “Looking for Results”

HBO

Looking Recap: Season 2, Episode 2, “Looking for Results”

“When you’re little, you just are really happy,” Patrick (Jonathan Groff) remarks to Kevin (Russell Tovey) as they loll in bed after a midday tryst. “But you don’t fully know exactly why.” This faint note of nostalgia runs through “Looking for Results” in subtle, slightly skewed ways, but it’s omnipresent nonetheless. The result each character seeks is, in essence, simplification, the ignorant bliss of childhood, and the result each one arrives at instead is a whole mess of unforeseen consequences. “Delete, delete, delete,” Patrick wishes when he encounters Richie (Raúl Castillo) near episode’s end, but in life as in Looking, there’s no going back.