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Kristen Stewart (#110 of 14)

Jerusalem Film Festival 2016 Julieta, Our Father, Certain Women, Death in Sarajevo, Harmonia, & More

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Jerusalem Film Festival 2016: Julieta, Our Father, Certain Women, Death in Sarajevo, Harmonia, & More

Inosan Productions

Jerusalem Film Festival 2016: Julieta, Our Father, Certain Women, Death in Sarajevo, Harmonia, & More

“Sababa!” Thus did Quentin Tarantino, in the only Hebrew slang every tourist learns, anoint his lifetime achievement award with the most appropriate endearment of the Tarantino ethos: “Cool!” Hoisting aloft a trophy that, from the evening distance, resembled a universal remote control made of coffee-colored glass, there could be no question that the Django Unchained auteur was the photographic and celebrity main attraction of the 33rd Jerusalem Film Festival’s opening night. After a brisk acceptance speech punctuated by a nod to the recently departed Michael Cimino, who was absent from the evening’s montage dedicated to recently departed notables from the world of film, he resumed his front row seat; a glut of photographers pursued him as iron filings collect around a magnet. Despite his predilection for speaking his mind, and the ongoing unrest in the United States, Tarantino put on his best diplomatic face and kept his opinions to himself.

Kristen Stewart-Starring Personal Shopper by Olivier Assayas Gets Trailer

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Kristen Stewart-Starring Personal Shopper by Olivier Assayas Gets Trailer

IFC Films

Kristen Stewart-Starring Personal Shopper by Olivier Assayas Gets Trailer

According our Cannes correspondent, Sam C. Mac, “no other film at Cannes this year has had quite the same shock of the strange” as Oliver Assayas’s Personal Shopper. The film stars Kristin Stewart, a favorite to win the festival’s Best Actress prize, as a supermodel’s fashion assistant who also happens to be a psychic medium. Following the death of her twin brother from a condition she’s also afflicted with, Stewart’s American in Paris is gripped by a state of ghostly stupor. The film, which received mixed reactions at its premiere on the Croisette, is Stewart’s second collaboration with Assayas after Clouds of Sils Maria and also stars Lars Eidinger (Everyone Else), Sigrid Bouaziz (Eden), and Anders Danielsen Lie (Oslo, August 31st).

Cannes Film Review: Personal Shopper and Julieta

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Cannes Film Review: Personal Shopper and Julieta

Cannes Film Festival

Cannes Film Review: Personal Shopper and Julieta

This year’s Cannes Film Festival could use more women directors, as there are only three among the official competition lineup of 20. What the festival’s program isn’t hurting for, however, are films centered around a distinctly female experience. Andrea Arnold, with American Honey, attempted a reimagining of Jack Kerouac’s masculine Beat Generation manifesto On the Road as a modern expression of a woman’s sex-rebel freedom; with The Handmaiden, Park Chan-wook adapted Sarah Waters’s novel Fingersmith by upping the agency of its femme fatales; and while Maren Adé’s Toni Erdmann may be named after its male protagonist, it’s much more about the effect he has on his daughter, an independent businesswoman.

Tribeca Review: The Emperor’s New Clothes and Anesthesia

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Tribeca Review: <em>The Emperor’s New Clothes</em> and <em>Anesthesia</em>
Tribeca Review: <em>The Emperor’s New Clothes</em> and <em>Anesthesia</em>

Comedian-actor Russell Brand has, in the past few years, been focusing his energies more on political activism, even going so far as to launch a web series and publish a book to further his campaign of economic revolution. The Emperor’s New Clothes, his documentary collaboration with director Michael Winterbottom, suggests that he’s picked up a few tactics from Michael Moore, grandstanding stunts and all. But say what you will about Moore spending the entirety of Roger & Me trying to score an interview with the CEO of General Motors, or actually landing one with Charlton Heston at the end of Bowling for Columbine, one could argue that he evinces at least a hint of interest in hearing these people try to defend themselves. When Brand pulls a similar stunt in The Emperor’s New Clothes, driving around in a van with “Shop A Banker” printed on it, and trying to burst into the offices of major banks like HSBC and RBS in order to speak to the CEOs who run them, he gives no indication that he’s interested in open discourse. Instead of any sense of intellectual curiosity to add depth to his agreeably impassioned anger, there’s only a preaching-to-the-choir sense of foregone conclusions. Why bother asking questions when you already think you know the answers?

15 Famous Movie Apparitions

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15 Famous Movie Apparitions
15 Famous Movie Apparitions

This weekend, your antidote to R-Pattz/K-Stew gossip is the sure-to-be throwaway ghost flick The Apparition, starring the crumbling couple’s Twilight co-star, Ashley Greene. Serving as Greene’s first star vehicle, the new thriller tells of a haunting presence derived from a shady parapsychology experiment, and sees a young woman (Greene) and her hunk husband (Sebastian Stan) scream their guts out before, naturally, calling in an expert (played by Lucius Malfoy himself, Tom Felton). There are plenty of memorable movie specters who’ve preceded Greene’s floorboard-creaking houseguest, and they’ll still be planted in viewers’ minds long after The Apparition dissolves into oblivion. Who to expect on this week’s list? Let’s just say that Carmen Maura, Jennifer Jones, and Bill Cosby have more in common than you might have thought.