House Logo
Explore categories +

Hbo (#110 of 142)

Watch: Exclusive Clip Featuring Michelle MacLaren on Directing The Deuce

Comments Comments (...)

Watch: Exclusive Clip Featuring Michelle MacLaren on Directing The Deuce

HBO

Watch: Exclusive Clip Featuring Michelle MacLaren on Directing The Deuce

In his recap of the season finale of The Deuce‘s first season, Slant‘s Michael Haigis wrote about how unwitting transformation was on display throughout the episode, and how “a character montage at the episode’s conclusion reveals a series of fates mostly crafted by outside influence.” In the exclusive clip below, director Michelle MacLaren elaborates on her decision to rhyme a character’s slow walk down a corridor with a scene from the show’s first episode. It’s a correlation that artfully speaks to the show’s obsession with the nature of gender politics in the early 1970s in New York City’s Times Square, during which time the porn industry was beginning its climb to legitimacy, as well as cultural permanence and billion-dollar profitability.

Oscar 2016 Winner Predictions Documentary Short

Comments Comments (...)

Oscar 2016 Winner Predictions: Documentary Short

Living Condition

Oscar 2016 Winner Predictions: Documentary Short

Our firm and perhaps cynical belief that confirmation bias motivates the average AMPAS voter’s decision process has served us well over the years. One rare exception was when we aligned ourselves with history and predicted that Agnieszka Holland’s In Darkness would upset Asghar Farhadi’s A Separation at the 2012 Oscars. In the end, the latter’s welcome victory mostly corroborated film critic and unlikely awards pundit J. Hoberman’s tacit acknowledgement, in an article for the Los Angeles Times about Hollywood’s relationship to the Holocaust, that the only way for a film about the Holocaust told from the perspective of its victims to lose an Oscar is for it to compete against a film, like The Virgin Spring, whose breaking into the mainstream so clearly meant that it was destined for greatness.

True Detective Recap Season 2, Episode 5, "Other Lives"

Comments Comments (...)

True Detective Recap: Season 2, Episode 5, “Other Lives”

HBO

True Detective Recap: Season 2, Episode 5, “Other Lives”

Throughout this season of True Detective, a singular point has been drilled into our heads: “We get the world we deserve.” This week, “Other Lives” suggests what we deserve is simply a construct: There’s nothing stopping Frank Semyon (Vince Vaughn) from walking away from his nightclub, poker room, and other enterprises. He may have a design, but as his wife, Jordan (Kelly Reilly), puts it, all the work he’s doing to get back to where he was before being robbed is “backslide city.” He may not like the term “gangster,” but he recognizes in a moment of clarity that it may fit; he can’t really put himself above the pimps and dealers he now works with, even if his suits and cologne are fancier. It’s no defense to say that “everything they do, they would do anyway,” because what’s to stop someone from saying the same thing about Frank? “I don’t want to see you lose who you’ve become,” says Jordan—and it’s not a matter of wealth, but of integrity. Even after all the horrors, he can choose to be a new man; he can set down that drink and forget about earning new land parcels through Catalyst by retrieving Caspere’s missing hard drive full of incriminating sex videos. Frank’s already survived moving into a smaller, shabbier place; he doesn’t have to keep dreaming of the idealized “best of all possible worlds” made popular in Candide. (The theme song hints at this too: To what extent can we really distinguish between levels of happiness? At some point, we must just “Nevermind.”)

Game of Thrones Recap Season 5, Episode 3, "High Sparrow"

Comments Comments (...)

Game of Thrones Recap: Season 5, Episode 3, “High Sparrow”

HBO

Game of Thrones Recap: Season 5, Episode 3, “High Sparrow”

Despite being home to the Faceless, the House of Black and White is filled with a variety of visages: statues to the various gods of Westeros. These are at once examples of the Many Faced God whom the Faceless worship and a pointed demonstration that the one true god is the one god who doesn’t need to be memorialized in stone—because that god, Death, is already everywhere. It’s a fitting setting for Arya (Maisie Williams) as she begins training under No One, the mysterious assassin currently wearing the face and name of Jaqen H’ghar (Tom Wlaschiha). It’s here that she can begin reclaiming her independence, after seasons of fear and flight, though—ironically—she can only do so by first figuratively murdering herself, casting off all her possessions in service to the god of Death. (There’s still a trace of the defiant girl from previous seasons when she chooses to hide her sword, Needle, rather than to throw it into the ocean.) It’s a perfect example of the erosive effects of tragedy, in that a person can only survive by becoming something else, and not for nothing does Arya spend the majority of this episode silently doing menial tasks, scrubbing away the past.