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Kristin Chenoweth (#110 of 4)

American Gods Recap Season 1, Episode 8, “Come to Jesus”

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American Gods Recap: Season 1, Episode 8, “Come to Jesus”

Starz

American Gods Recap: Season 1, Episode 8, “Come to Jesus”

“Come to Jesus” ends the first season of American Gods on an awkward and anticlimactic note. Creators and co-screenwriters Bryan Fuller and Michael Green seem to be aware of their own perversity, cracking a joke about it early in the episode. Mr. Wednesday (Ian McShane) and Shadow Moon (Ricky Whittle) are at the office of Mr. Nancy (Orlando Jones), the present incarnation of the god Anansi, who’s tailoring suits for the next leg of their journey. For a moment, it seems that we’ve dodged the obligation of sitting through a deity origin tale that typically opens each episode, until Mr. Nancy announces that he has a story, which Wednesday greets with comic frustration while nursing a tall whiskey. Wednesday is clearly speaking for the audience here, who may be understandably weary of yet another damn flashback.

On the Twentieth Century Interview with Peter Gallagher

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On the Twentieth Century Interview with Peter Gallagher

Joan Marcus

On the Twentieth Century Interview with Peter Gallagher

Peter Gallagher and On the Twentieth Century each made their Broadway debuts during the same 1977 to ’78 season. Since then, the musical has rarely been seen, but the actor has had one of those rare careers in which he’s perpetually popped up in most every performance medium and genre without wearing out his welcome or curdling into type. On Broadway, he’s run the gamut from Hair, in which he made that debut in the love-rock musical’s short-lived first revival, to the tragic Long Day’s Journey Into Night with Jack Lemmon and Kevin Spacey, to the golden-age musical Guys and Dolls with Nathan Lane. He’s played key roles, usually as a slickster, in films that helped define their times, like Sex, Lies, and Videotape and The Player. On television, Gallagher has matured into authority figures—mostly trustworthy, sometimes not—on such series as The O.C. and Togetherness. He’s even put out an album, 7 Days in Memphis, and toured the country with a cabaret act peppered, like his conversation, with spot-on impersonations of the many legends he’s known.

A Few Words in Defense of—and Against—Newsweek‘s Ramin Setoodeh

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A Few Words in Defense of—and Against—<em>Newsweek</em>‘s Ramin Setoodeh
A Few Words in Defense of—and Against—<em>Newsweek</em>‘s Ramin Setoodeh

4. “For all the beefy bravado that Rock Hudson projects on screen, Pillow Talk dissolves into a farce when you know the likes of his true bedmates. (Just rewatch the scene where he’s wading around in a bubble bath by himself.)”

So let’s be clear on this: Two out actors’ performances don’t effectively convince Setoodah (which is to say only him, and nothing about any other audience’s reception) that their characters are straight, Jack Nicholson once starred as Helen Hunt’s romantic foil, and Pillow Talk is a late-’50s cinematic artifact that makes it impossible to avoid Rock Hudson’s off-screen sexuality because of a bubble bath (as opposed to the fact that the whole film is so campy in the first place), which means we’ll never have a big, gay George Clooney because coming out is a terrible move for your career. Obviously an infallible string of logic. And by “infallible,” I mean ZOINKS.

Single Review: Laura Bell Bundy’s "Giddy on Up"

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Single Review: Laura Bell Bundy’s “Giddy on Up”
Single Review: Laura Bell Bundy’s “Giddy on Up”

Country music and Broadway tend to have very little in common: Dolly Parton’s 9 to 5 musical and Reba McEntire’s lauded star turn in Annie Get Your Gun are perhaps the highest profile crossovers between the two disparate worlds in recent memory—not counting Randy Travis’s gay panic when confronted with Adam Lambert’s WTF cover of “Ring of Fire” on American Idol. Enter Kentucky native Laura Bell Bundy, whose film credits include “That girl who grows up to be Bonnie Hunt in Jumanji” but who is better known for her stage work, having played Amber in Hairspray and having originated the role of Elle Woods in the Legally Blonde musical. If Bundy learned anything from her years on stage, it’s how to make an entrance, because her debut single and video, “Giddy on Up,” are hands-down the most fascinating opening salvos to come out of Nashville in years. Granted, “fascinating” doesn’t necessarily equate to “good,” but Bundy actually wants her audience to have a strong opinion, and that’s a risk worth talking about. Which brings the conversation to this: