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Bruce LaBruce (#110 of 2)

Radical Chic: Madonna Unveils Short Film Secret Project Revolution

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Radical Chic: Madonna Unveils Short Film Secret Project Revolution
Radical Chic: Madonna Unveils Short Film Secret Project Revolution

In his 2004 film The Raspberry Reich, Bruce LaBruce declares that “Madonna is counter-revolutionary.” Of course, it’s one of many parodies of political sloganeering in the film; in the real world, the impact of the pop-diva doyenne’s work, particularly in terms of post-feminist sexual agency, is unmistakable. Notably, Madonna’s American Life album—which dropped a year before The Raspberry Reich and finds the singer posing on the cover like a cross between Che Guevara and Patty Hearst, two revolutionary icons who figure prominently in the film—proved that Madonna’s politics are best delivered with tongue in cheek. When she’s ventured beyond sexual politics (or, say, the Catholic church, her qualms with which are ultimately about sex and gender anyway), she’s stumbled perilously close to the brand of radical chic LaBruce satirizes in his film.

Venice Film Festival 2013 Gerontophilia, Tracks, & Why Don’t You Play in Hell?

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Venice Film Festival 2013: Gerontophilia, Tracks, & Why Don’t You Play in Hell?
Venice Film Festival 2013: Gerontophilia, Tracks, & Why Don’t You Play in Hell?

Mahatma Gandhi is—and always has been—many things to many people, but a sex symbol? In Canadian provocateur Bruce LaBruce’s bluntly titled Gerontophilia, a hugely enlarged rendering of the Indian politician’s visage looms, wall-mounted, over the bed of young protagonist Lake (Pier-Gabriel Lajoie). It’s a sly sight gag, pointing both to the ostensibly straight Lake’s burgeoning desire for aging male flesh, and functioning as a subversive re-contextualization of the familiar. This goes for the subject matter, which has been addressed in films like Hal Ashby’s evergreen Harold and Maude, but still remains a taboo—as does LaBruce’s work. Anyone familiar with the director’s thematically transgressive, sexually explicit canon (No Skin Off My Ass, Skin Flick) might be expecting a result even more startling than usual given the premise, but Gerontophilia may be his most formally conservative film to date.