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Pet Sematary Remake, Starring Jason Clarke and Amy Seimetz, Gets Trailer

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Pet Sematary Remake, Starring Jason Clarke and Amy Seimetz, Gets Trailer

Paramount Pictures

Pet Sematary Remake, Starring Jason Clarke and Amy Seimetz, Gets Trailer

Mary Lambert’s Pet Sematary, which was released the same year as the filmmaker made Madonna’s iconic “Like a Prayer” video, hasn’t aged as well as other Stephen King adaptations from the era. As such, it will come as a surprise to no one that a remake is on the horizon. Directed by Kevin Kölsch and Dennis Widmyer from a screenplay by David Kajganich and Jeff Buhler, the new Pet Sematary follows a doctor, Louis Creed (Jason Clarke), and his wife, Rachel (Amy Seimetz), who stumble upon a mysterious burial ground near their family’s new home in rural Maine. Tragedy naturally strikes, forcing Louis to turn to an unusual neighbor (played by the reliably unusual John Lithgow) and in the process unleashing an unfathomable evil that will no doubt have hyperbolic consequences.

Berlinale 2014 The Better Angels

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Berlinale 2014: The Better Angels
Berlinale 2014: The Better Angels

A cursory IMDb search shows that The Better Angels’s writer-director, A.J. Edwards, worked as an editorial intern on Terrence Malick’s The New World, one of five editors on To the Wonder, and as a “key artistic consultant” on The Tree of Life. It’s not quite right to say that The Better Angels exhibits Malick’s influence; it plays more like a student film assignment in copping another filmmaker’s style from stem to stern.

Set in the Indiana backwoods where Abraham Lincoln (newcomer Braydon Denney) lived as a child, The Better Angels takes a demonstrably Malickian approach to American mythmaking, locating the core of the 16th American president’s eminent integrity in his hardscrabble upbringing. Both embraced and tested by his salt-of-the-earth father (Jason Clarke) and doted on by his loving mother (Brit Marling), young Abe is shown to learn the values that would come to define his character, at least in the American historical memory: reason, self-control, morality, empathy—those titular “better angels of our nature” that he would index in his first inaugural address. As he works the land and, eventually, goes to school, there are intimations that the young man is meant for better things.