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Ed Begley Jr. (#110 of 2)

Curb Your Enthusiasm Recap Season 9, Episode 6, “The Accidental Text on Purpose”

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Curb Your Enthusiasm Recap: Season 9, Episode 6, “The Accidental Text on Purpose”

John P. Johnson/HBO

Curb Your Enthusiasm Recap: Season 9, Episode 6, “The Accidental Text on Purpose”

Larry David has worn many hats throughout Curb Your Enthusiasm's run. This season alone he's been a pickle hero and fatwa boy, but more often than not, he's just a “four-eyed fuck.” “The Accidental Text on Purpose,” last night's episode of the show, introduced the unlikeliest of roles for Larry: relationship guru. Why anyone would trust Larry with relationship advice is unclear, but for the better part of the episode, Larry doles out some inspired—and appropriately disingenuous—nuggets of wisdom.

This Moment in History: Recount

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This Moment in History: <em>Recount</em>
This Moment in History: <em>Recount</em>

Recount, debuting tonight on HBO at 9 p.m. EDT, is the sort of movie that might have been mounted by a studio with hopes of Oscar success twenty years ago. Dole out juicy roles to a mostly all-star cast, toss a middlebrow director (Sydney Pollack might have done the trick in 1988) into the mix, let the generally excellent script carry the weight, and you might have had something. Laced with dark humor and somehow making what amounts to a long chess game dramatically compelling, Recount is probably the best made-for-TV movie of the year, a distinction which would carry more weight if a) the various networks made more made-for-TV movies and b) it hadn’t arrived at such a fortuitous moment, six days before the Democratic National Committee’s Rules and Bylaws panel meets to decide what to do about Florida in yet ANOTHER election-related brouhaha. In another 20 years, Recount probably won’t play as persuasively as it does right now, in this moment, when it largely stirs up feelings long dormant in an electorate that desires, at some primal level, a do-over. Largely unable to take the long view because of when it was made, Recount is definitely a chronicle of its time and place, but it can’t find anything larger to say about the political process than, “Wasn’t it sad that Al Gore lost and we had to put up with this?”