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Tom Sizemore (#110 of 3)

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap Part 10

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Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 10

Suzanne Tenner/Showtime

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 10

In “The Marriage of Heaven and Hell,” William Blake wrote: “Without Contraries is no progression…Love and Hate are necessary to Human existence.” Last night’s installment of Twin Peaks: The Return illuminated the precarious balance between these two opposing forces, previously represented as overarching cosmic principles in “Part 8” but here embodied at the level of all-too-human experience in ways both touching and terrifying.

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap Part 6

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Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 6

Showtime

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 6

Many of the events in the latest episode of Twin Peaks: The Return seem to depend on the toss of a coin, inviting speculation about the balance between chance and necessity in the lives of the characters. When Richard Horne (Eamon Farren) buys a load of a drug called “sparkle” from Red (Balthazar Getty), the latter bewilders Richard with a surreal coin trick. The coin impossibly hangs in the air for some time, before then manifesting in Richard’s mouth. Except it hasn’t, because it’s back in Red’s palm. Red tells Richard: “Heads I win. Tails you lose.” Chance obviously isn’t a factor in their deal. The game is rigged, as the house always wins—and it’s an encounter that sets in motion a series of events that reverberates throughout the episode.

Summer of ‘89: Lock Up

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Summer of ‘89: <em>Lock Up</em>
Summer of ‘89: <em>Lock Up</em>

Lambasted by critics and shunned by moviegoers, Lock Up got swallowed up at the box office during its brief, four-week run during August of 1989, and seeing the film 25 years later, not much beyond potential camp value beckons for reconsideration. However, even the desire to revel in director John Flynn’s ridiculous blending of sentimentality and prison-yard brutality is short-circuited by a script that dulls the proceedings into a male melodrama of the most grating variety. The premise is sheer absurdity: With only a brief period remaining on his prison sentence, Frank Leone (Sylvester Stallone) is transferred to a maximum-security prison overseen by Warden Drumgoole (Donald Sutherland), who seeks vengeance since Frank bad-mouthed Drumgoole’s reckless treatment of prisoners during an early part of his sentence, resulting in Drumgoole’s transfer to Gateway Prison. Pissed and determined not to let Frank off easy, Drumgoole assures Frank: “This is hell and I’m going to give you the guided tour.”

Unfortunately, even this goofily violent promise is something Lock Up has little interest in actualizing, as the proceedings afford Frank relative freedom around the prison, even befriending a team of inmate mechanics, including Dallas (Tom Sizemore) and Eclipse (Frank McRae). Moreover, Flynn opts for gooey piano music as the compliment for Frank’s reveries of being reunited with his girlfriend, Melissa (Darlanne Fluegel), who blunders around the film screaming and repeating, “What have you done with Frank!?,” nearly every time she appears on screen. Naturally, any initial setbacks from a happy ending are steadily squelched within the film’s entirely canned proceedings, as Stallone swings his fists with the force those veiny biceps suggest, knocking Jordan Lund’s sadistic Officer Manly (!) permanently on his ass, while Drumgoole’s plot is finally discovered by the lawful Captain Meissner (John Amos). Cue the shitty music and a concluding freeze frame, and Melissa’s back in Frank’s arms, ready to ride off into the sunset.