House Logo
Explore categories +

X Men: Days Of Future Past (#110 of 6)

Oscar 2015 Winner Predictions: Visual Effects

Comments Comments (...)

Oscar 2015 Winner Predictions: Visual Effects
Oscar 2015 Winner Predictions: Visual Effects

This year’s slate gives us PSTD-drenched flashbacks to the legion of fanboys defending the honor of their beloved caped crusaders in our various comments sections. Grouse though I may, there’s no denying that even this category’s historical resistance to the superhero genre is futile now that the blockbuster genre has all but taken over blockbuster filmmaking. Or is it? Yes, three of the nominees this year are straight from the Haus of Marvel, but does that change the fact that, barring some borderline exceptions like the first two Indiana Jones films or Forrest Gump, a measly two superhero movies—Superman and Spider-Man 2—have ever actually taken home the award here? Add to that the potential for vote-splitting between the carbon-copy spectacle of Captain America: The Winter Soldier, X-Men: Days of Future Past, and Guardians of the Galaxy, and you’re left with a two-pony race. (You could argue that Guardians’s snarkier tone sets it apart from the other two, but only if its VFX strategy had offered a strong visual corollary.) Three years ago, we were pretty sure that the expressive CGI primates of Rise of the Planet of the Apes would survive the freight train of momentum behind Hugo in the tech categories. The wizardry animating Caesar and his ilk has only improved since 2011, but it bears repeating: Do Academy voters actually like this franchise? Or any franchise? You can count on one finger the number of sequels that have won in Oscar’s most sequel-friendly category in the last 10 years, so you have to assume Interstellar’s going to smack the competition down like a mile-high tidal wave.

Debut Trailer Drops for Bryan Singer’s X-Men: Days of Future Past

Comments Comments (...)

Debut Trailer Drops for Bryan Singer’s <em>X-Men: Days of Future Past</em>
Debut Trailer Drops for Bryan Singer’s <em>X-Men: Days of Future Past</em>

As opposed to the growing universe of The Avengers, the X-Men saga seems less a dollar-driven mega-brand these days than an interweaving, incestuous franchise bent on its own redemption. James Mangold’s The Wolverine rather effectively removed the bitter taste of Gavin Hood’s X-Men Origins: Wolverine, and Matthew Vaughn’s X-Men: First Class opted to wind the clock all the way back to the 1960s, as if to distract us from the overreaching piecemeal mess that was Brett Ratner’s X-Men: The Last Stand. Now comes X-Men: Days of Future Past, whose very plot involves amending the ills of days gone by, and using this valiant approach to suppress chaos and make for a better future. Allowing life to imitate art, Marvel even reached into its own past to bring this picture to the screen, tapping X-Men and X2 director Bryan Singer to once again take the reins. Few would argue that Singer’s X films, particularly X2, were the strongest of the series, and then there’s the tangentially related tidbit that his Superman Returns soared above Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel. It’s with that directorial promise that viewers can watch Future Past’s debut trailer with confidence, taking in the Marty McFly parallels to a comic-book storyline first penned by Chris Claremont and John Byrne, and watching Halle Berry channel Helen Slater from The Legend of Billie Jean. X-Men: Days of Future Past may not be able to wipe clean the sins of the series, but thanks to its helmer and the sheer audacity of its apparent convolution, it may just be the rare new superhero film that’s actually remarkable. Watch the trailer after the jump.

Poster Lab: X-Men: Days of Future Past

Comments Comments (...)

Poster Lab: <em>X-Men: Days of Future Past</em>
Poster Lab: <em>X-Men: Days of Future Past</em>

If you wait until halfway through the credits of new Marvel actioner The Wolverine, you’ll get—surprise!—an Easter-egg-y teaser of X-Men: Days of Future Past, the latest leg of this comic-book-maker turned film studio’s incestuous universe. In the clip [spoiler alert], Logan (Hugh Jackman) catches up with Magneto (Ian McKellen) and a resurrected Professor X (Patrick Stewart), who, now evidently on the same team, warn their furry friend of an incoming menace that’s a threat to all mutants. Thanks to this early teaser poster, and, to a lesser degree, this one, fanboys know said threat is the infamous army of towering robotic “Sentinels,” which, in the end-credits scene, are further foreshadowed by a flash of the Trask Industries logo (for the non-geeks to whom this means nothing, just roll with me).

Box Office Rap The Wolverine and Post-Comic-Con Malaise

Comments Comments (...)

Box Office Rap: The Wolverine and Post-Comic-Con Malaise
Box Office Rap: The Wolverine and Post-Comic-Con Malaise

While DC and Warner Bros. stole headlines this past weekend with plans to integrate Batman into Man of Steel 2 (a.k.a. Batman vs. Superman, or vice versa, as writer David S. Goyer confirmed), it’s Marvel and 20th Century Fox that look to immediately capitalize on all the geekdom hoopla this weekend with The Wolverine, the second standalone film for Hugh Jackman’s titular X-Man, which has made him one of the highest paid actors in Hollywood. What’s changed since the release of X-Men Origins: Wolverine just four years ago? For starters, it appears that Fox has abandoned plans to make standalone films for each of their comic-book properties, instead offering X-Men: First Class as a means to reboot the entire franchise, while anchoring Wolverine on his own for two films until…wait for it…X-Men: Days of Future Past, which will finally bring all of our favorite mutants together again, marking four X-Men films in just six years.

On the Rise Nicholas Hoult

Comments Comments (...)

On the Rise: Nicholas Hoult

Warner Bros.

On the Rise: Nicholas Hoult

Amid the new British invasion of rising stars (see Benedict Cumberbatch, David Oyelowo, and the entire cast of Downton Abbey), the strongest candidate for male heartthrob seems to be Nicholas Hoult, an English actor and model who just turned 23, 10 years after co-starring with Hugh Grant in About a Boy.

Born with actorly blood, Hoult is the great-nephew of Anna Neagle, British star and muse to director Herbert Wilcox, whom she wed in the 1940s. Part of Hoult’s appeal is that he carries some of the classic mystique of Neagle’s heyday, his stark features begging to be captured in black and white, and his lean frame designed for chic formal wear. It’s no wonder perfectionist Tom Ford nabbed Hoult for his ’60s-era feature debut, A Single Man, casting the then-20-year-old as Kenny, the studious slice of eye-candy who connects with Colin Firth’s professor. Through Ford’s stylized lens, viewers saw the extent to which Hoult could be an onscreen asset, providing a look both pure and dangerous, nostalgic and new. Few, though, might have expected just how big a star he was on his way to becoming, with multiple blockbusters and, potentially, three franchises on the horizon.