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Matt Bomer (#110 of 3)

American Horror Story: Freak Show Recap Episode 5, "Pink Cupcakes"

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American Horror Story: Freak Show Recap: Episode 5, “Pink Cupcakes”

FX

American Horror Story: Freak Show Recap: Episode 5, “Pink Cupcakes”

“Pink Cupcakes” is a marked improvement over last week’s episode of Freak Show, “Edward Mordrake (Part 2).” For starters, there’s something like an actual plot, though it inelegantly crisscrosses back and forth between each freak’s reliably grueling plight-of-the-week. More importantly, Stanley’s (Denis O’Hare) presence on the freak show’s campgrounds provides the series with a significant representation of the “straight” world that’s often discussed, but rarely seen, casting shades of actual contrast and conflict on the gruesome chicanery. With the series belaboring the freaks’ theoretically unexpected likability at every possible turn, it’s the villains who stand to walk away with Freak Show, as their unapologetically one-dimensional mugging comes to represent a sort of refreshing truth in advertising.

Poster Lab: Fifty Shades of Grey and the Year-Long Movie-Marketing Tease

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Poster Lab: <em>Fifty Shades of Grey</em> and the Year-Long Movie-Marketing Tease
Poster Lab: <em>Fifty Shades of Grey</em> and the Year-Long Movie-Marketing Tease

Just as E.L. James’s Fifty Shades of Grey books began as Twilight fan fiction, the posters for the film adaptation have long been confined to the world of fan-made art, where eager, horny designers could get their Anastasia Steele on and realize their fantasies. Many such posters featured rumored leading man Matt Bomer as Christian Grey, while others, like this entertaining gem, cast Amanda Seyfried and Arrow’s Stephen Amell as James’s BDSM-loving couple. But on Jan. 25, roughly three months after Dakota Johnson and Jamie Dornan were announced as the film’s leads, the first official one-sheet was released, depicting Dornan with his back to the viewer, gazing out across the Seattle skyline. The poster has reportedly been accompanied by five exclusive billboards, which can be seen at five specific locations in New York, L.A., Chicago, San Francisco, and, of course, Seattle. It’s also joined by the launch of the film’s website, where visitors can “apply for an internship program” with Grey Enterprises Holdings Inc. (or, in other words, sign up to be on the mailing list for the Universal Pictures release). It’s all part of the kick-off of the ultimate movie-marketing tease, which is touting a film that isn’t due in theaters for a full calendar year.

On Trend The Changing State of Coming Out in Hollywood

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On Trend: The Changing State of Coming Out in Hollywood
On Trend: The Changing State of Coming Out in Hollywood

She certainly came prepared. The E! correspondents may have told you that Jodie Foster wore Giorgio Armani to the Golden Globes, but her frock was more like a suit of armor, its metallic straps criss-crossing her chest as if she were bracing for impact. Amid an awards show that’s often little more than a boring, booze-soaked, wannabe Oscars, Foster—who, at 50, proved a drastically young choice for the HFPA’s career-defining Cecil B. Demille Award—provided a riveting slice of LGBT history, using the acceptance of her honorary trophy as an opportunity to deliver a coming-out speech…sorta. Everyone knows the story by now: How Foster jokingly announced that she’s “single” after a virtual drum roll of anticipation, how she thanked her longtime partner and two strapping sons, and how she professed the value of personal privacy, declaring that she’s no reality star, like “Honey Boo Boo Child.” Gawker had a particularly douchey field day with the latter portion of Foster’s monologue, viciously berating the actress for demanding privacy as a public figure in a very public forum. The contradiction at which Gawker took aim is glaringly apparent, but while celebrities may sacrifice certain libel rights and anonymous trips to the grocery store, they are not, in fact, required to divulge personal details to the masses. If there’s anything to deride about Foster’s show-stopping moment, it’s that it felt dated, dusty, even quaint.