House Logo
Explore categories +

Evan Peters (#110 of 27)

American Horror Story: Cult Recap Episode 6, “Mid-Western Assassin”

Comments Comments (...)

American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 6, “Mid-Western Assassin”
American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 6, “Mid-Western Assassin”

Almost everything in “Mid-Western Assassin,” including the scenes from the mass shooting that bookend the latest episode of American Horror Story: Cult, plays a bit too much like a thesis presentation. Todd Kubrak's screenplay carefully explains every motivation, and Bradley Buecker's direction dutifully offers up the visual corroboration. Worse, that thesis is fraudulent, the result of cherry-picking data—that is, careful editing—so as to mislead viewers.

American Horror Story: Cult Recap Episode 5, “Holes”

Comments Comments (...)

American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 5, “Holes”
American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 5, “Holes”

It takes less than 30 seconds for “Holes,” the latest episode of American Horror Story: Cult, to reference its title. WBNR’s Bob Thompson (Dermot Mulroney) might be a pervert, but he’s not wrong to ream out Beverly Hope (Adina Porter) for her recent on-air editorializing and fear-mongering: “There’s all sorts of goddamn holes in your stories!” And throughout the episode, Crystal Liu’s screenplay goes about addressing the holes that Cult itself created with the revelations from the flashback-filled “11/9,” but the answers here aren’t only unsatisfyingly blunt, but only raise more questions, to the point that the show’s narrative up to this point has been retconned.

American Horror Story: Cult Recap Episode 4, “11/9”

Comments Comments (...)

American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 4, “11/9”
American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 4, “11/9”

The secret ballot that we use to cast our votes on election day is a rare opportunity for us to express our political views without risk of public opprobrium. “11/9,” the strongest episode yet of American Horror Story: Cult, taps into the power of the voting booth to allow us such a freedom, drawing back the curtain not just on the political choices of the show’s central characters, but on their innermost thoughts. In the process of an extended flashback, “11/9” also peels back the masks of the season’s antagonistic clowns, providing these menacing murderers with rich backstories: It turns out that they’re not just manifestations of our fears in the wake of Trump’s election, but victims of a system that the president simply inherited.

American Horror Story: Cult Recap Episode 3, “Neighbors from Hell”

Comments Comments (...)

American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 3, “Neighbors from Hell”
American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 3, “Neighbors from Hell”

As a society, we’ve come to rely on rules to protect us and rights to give us a sense of power. If there’s a disturbance coming from the home next to our own, we know that there are authorities who we can alert. And if our government takes an action that we find undesirable, we can petition against it. Perhaps the biggest psychic trauma, then, experienced by many people in this country after Trump’s election to the presidency—a trauma that’s the focus of American Horror Story: Cult—is the realization that those rules and rights don’t feel as sacrosanct as we thought they were.

American Horror Story: Cult Recap Episode 2, “Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark”

Comments Comments (...)

American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 2, “Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark”
American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 2, “Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark”

For better and worse, the horror on American Horror Story: Cult is all text and no subtext. Take the title of “Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark,” which isn’t some abstract nod to our needing to face the fears lurking in the darkness of our lives, but a reference to the blackout that leaves Ally (Sarah Paulson) in a panic. The show isn’t content to simply talk about the red-meat hate speech of the right; it literally hangs it out in the open after Roger (Zack Ward), a bigoted sous-chef, is found affixed to a hook in the Butchery’s kitchen freezer.

American Horror Story: Cult Recap Episode 1, “Election Night”

Comments Comments (...)

American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 1, “Election Night”

FX

American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 1, “Election Night”

After years of trying to conjure up a universal boogeymen with which to tap into the primal fears of Americans, Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk have landed almost effortlessly on target. “Election Night,” the first episode of American Horror Story: Cult, knows exactly how to trigger us; in fact, that’s the modus operandi of the show’s central antagonist, Kai Anderson (Evan Peters). This anarchist’s most terrifying moment isn’t when he rubs blended orange Cheetos all over his face in a send-up of Glenn Beck’s mocking of Donald Trump, or the thought of him donning a three-faced clown mask to terrorize his fellow Americans, but when he calmly walks into a local city council meeting, clad in a suit, to suggest that government allow fear to reign. “Haven’t you been watching what’s been going on in the world?” he asks.

American Horror Story: Freak Show Recap Episode 13, "Curtain Call"

Comments Comments (...)

American Horror Story: Freak Show Recap: Episode 13, “Curtain Call”

FX

American Horror Story: Freak Show Recap: Episode 13, “Curtain Call”

“Curtain Call” ends American Horror Story: Freak Show on an unsurprisingly dour and haphazard note, reveling in the show’s most annoying ongoing assertion: that the freaks are “just like everyone else.” No, they aren’t. A man with flippers for hands who’s lived in a circus all his life fantasizing about joining conventional American society isn’t like a man born into that society unquestioningly with the privilege to take it for granted. These are profoundly different emotional experiences, and, if this sounds like over-literal nitpicking, bear in mind that American Horror Story goes to great efforts to congratulate itself on its “other”-friendly symbolism. The freaks are clearly meant to represent a great variety of minorities, and their often boring “magical negro” cuddliness is meant to attest to the inherent unifying decency of the human species regardless of variation.

American Horror Story: Freak Show Recap Episode 12, "Show Stoppers"

Comments Comments (...)

American Horror Story: Freak Show Recap: Episode 12, “Show Stoppers”

FX

American Horror Story: Freak Show Recap: Episode 12, “Show Stoppers”

Freak Show, which is now all but certain to go down in the record books as the weakest season of American Horror Story so far, helps to confirm an unofficial rule about the series at large: The more a season actively utilizes its chosen setting, the better it is. Asylum explicitly, cannily exploited the fears we have of a mental institution, positioning it as a convincing, disturbing barometer for social ills. Murder House played with most of the haunted-house-movie tropes, adding a dash of kink to a genre that, as of late, too often resists it. Coven, the first really uneven season, appeared to be driven by clichés that are more routinely associated with superheroes (particularly the X-Men) than witches. And Freak Show, apart from the occasional ghoulish flourish, really needn’t be set at the titular grounds at all, as much of its conflicts, such as they are, derive from isolated betrayals and killings that are often accompanied by the obligatory speech about freaks’ rights. A freak show is a potentially great setting for a horror series, but it’s hardly mattered here, as we’ve rarely seen a performance of the show, and backstage shenanigans are essentially nonexistent.

American Horror Story: Freak Show Recap Episode 11, "Magical Thinking"

Comments Comments (...)

American Horror Story: Freak Show Recap: Episode 11, “Magical Thinking”

FX

American Horror Story: Freak Show Recap: Episode 11, “Magical Thinking”

After “Orphans,” a surprisingly confident and empathetic outing that will almost certainly go down as the best episode of American Horror Story: Freak Show, “Magical Thinking” finds the series resorting to its usual bag of boring, hyperbolically over-plotted tricks. As with a number of prior episodes, a lot of stuff happens in “Magical Thinking”—a major character is introduced out of nowhere, a series regular abruptly dies, a game-changing business deal is brokered—to weirdly little effect. There’s a fatuous rat-a-tat ticker-tape vibe to this series: bam, bam, bam, then nothing. One could be kind and call the plot progression “free associative,” but that freedom of association only leads us down an avenue of busy repetition. As “Orphans” memorably showed us that less is more, even on a historically “more, more, more” kind of series like Freak Show.

American Horror Story: Freak Show Recap Episode 10, "Orphans"

Comments Comments (...)

American Horror Story: Freak Show Recap: Episode 10, “Orphans”

FX

American Horror Story: Freak Show Recap: Episode 10, “Orphans”

“Orphans” finds American Horror Story: Freak Show taking a surprisingly earnest detour from its usual preachy, ultra-violently “relevant” shenanigans. The episode is mostly concerned with pinhead Pepper (Naomi Grossman) in the wake of her husband Salty’s (Christopher Neiman) sudden death in his sleep, which is to say that, for the first time in eons, the series is centered on an actual narrative idea that serves to unify most of its tangents. Acting out, thrashing about the freak show, Pepper is inconsolable. Her depression, coupled with the fact that the freaks are finally appearing to notice that they’re dying left and right since the arrival of Stanley (Denis O’Hare) and Esmerelda (Emma Roberts), spurs Elsa (Jessica Lange) to talk strategy with Desiree (Angela Bassett), which leads to a conversation about the formation of the freak show as the two knock back schnapps.