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Aubrey Plaza (#110 of 3)

The Little Hours, with Aubrey Plaza and Dave Franco, Gets Green Band Trailer

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The Little Hours, with Aubrey Plaza and Dave Franco, Gets Green Band Trailer

Gunpowder & Sky

The Little Hours, with Aubrey Plaza and Dave Franco, Gets Green Band Trailer

A little over a month after the official red band trailer for The Little Hours was released, the Jeff Baena film gets a much more safe-for-work green band trailer. Here’s the official description of the film:

Medieval nuns Alessandra (Alison Brie), Fernanda (Aubrey Plaza), and Ginevra (Kate Micucci) lead a simple life in their convent. Their days are spent chafing at monastic routine, spying on one another, and berating the estate’s day laborer. After a particularly vicious insult session drives the peasant away, Father Tommasso (John C. Reilly) brings on new hired hand Massetto (Dave Franco), a virile young servant forced into hiding by his angry lord. Introduced to the sisters as a deaf-mute to discourage temptation, Massetto struggles to maintain his cover as the repressed nunnery erupts in a whirlwind of pansexual horniness, substance abuse, and wicked revelry.

Tribeca Review: The Wannabe, The Driftless Area, & Meadowland

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Tribeca Review: <em>The Wannabe</em>, <em>The Driftless Area</em>, & <em>Meadowland</em>
Tribeca Review: <em>The Wannabe</em>, <em>The Driftless Area</em>, & <em>Meadowland</em>

Set in Little Italy, executive-produced by Martin Scorsese, and “inspired by” a true story, The Wannabe is a solid but unexceptional addition to the growing canon of gangster movies whose mobsters aren’t glamorous, soulful antiheroes, but canny and unprincipled brutes. Not much is known about why the real Thomas and Rosemarie Uva chose to do something as risky and, not to put too fine a point on it, stupid as robbing mafia social clubs in Queens (the Daily News called them Bonnie and Clod). In last year’s Rob the Mob, Thomas is portrayed as being angry at the mob for having beaten his father when he was late with his payments on a business loan, but The Wannabe’s writer-director, Nick Sandow, shows him as motivated by a childlike obsession with the mafia in general, and John Gotti in particular. Desperate to be accepted into one of the families, this version of the man somehow convinces himself that robbing gangsters as they play cards is a good way to prove that he belongs. But then, thinking isn’t exactly his strong suit.

Poster Lab: A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III

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Poster Lab: <em>A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III</em>
Poster Lab: <em>A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III</em>

In case you’ve been wondering what Charlie Sheen’s been up to, it appears he’s been busy portraying another Charlie: Charles Swan III, the womanizing protagonist of Roman Coppola’s latest, A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III. Along with the wordy, head-trippy title, the film’s flagship poster suggests a very Hunter S. Thompson-esque romp, the sun beating down on a whole lot of hedonistic, ’70s-era elements. The ad deftly achieves a groovy, throwback mood, nailing that evocative cool that’s also been used to promote flicks like Jackie Brown. Its red-tinted characters back up against a hazy California sky, and their duds and hairstyles scream disco-day nostalgia (yes, that’s Jason Schwartzman sporting a Jheri curl). An accomplished music video director known for keen stylization, and for collaborating on the meticuolus work of his sister Sofia and friend Wes Anderson, Coppola no doubt hand a strong hand in the movie’s one-sheet development, bring artful verve to the push of a film that seems quite the hard sell.