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The Deuce Recap Season 1, Episode 6, “Why Me?”

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The Deuce Recap: Season 1, Episode 6, “Why Me?”

Paul Schiraldi

The Deuce Recap: Season 1, Episode 6, “Why Me?”

The first five episodes of The Deuce foresaw the drastic transformation of New York City’s sex trade, and in “Why Me?” a new framework finally materializes. The brothels are open. Porn is here. And keeping with the show’s devotion to historical accuracy, the revolution is far from explosive.

Cannes Film Review: Paterson

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Cannes Film Review: Paterson

Cannes Film Festival

Cannes Film Review: Paterson

Jim Jarmusch’s zen cool has rarely been deployed as effortlessly, or as confidently, as it is in Paterson. Set in the titular New Jersey town, and developing into a kind of city symphony for the modest locale, the film is almost devoid of conflict. A part-time poet and full-time bus driver (Adam Driver) wakes up every morning next to his girlfriend, Laura (Golshifteh Farahani). He goes to work, he comes home for dinner, and he usually goes out for a beer at his favorite bar. This is the quotidian as contented domesticity: Driver’s character, who’s also called Paterson, likes his job, loves Laura (as well as her scoundrel of a pet pug), and values what time he can find to pen poetry in a little pocket-sized pad he calls his “Secret Book.”

15 Famous Movie Drug Dealers

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15 Famous Movie Drug Dealers
15 Famous Movie Drug Dealers

In Pusher, which hits theaters this weekend, Briton Richard Coyle stars as a mid-level drug dealer, whose business is booming in London’s underground culture. A remake of Nicolas Winding Refn’s 1990s thriller, the film (which also marks director Luis Prieto’s English-language debut) watches as a drug lord’s life implodes, a process with which filmgoers are quite familiar. Throughout much of cinema history, and especially in recent decades, drug pushers of all walks have graced the screen, providing brief escapes for lost souls and party people. But be them morphine sellers, pot distributors, or even moonshine runners, the party has to stop some time.

The Wire Recap: Season 4, Episode 13, "Final Grades"

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<em>The Wire</em> Recap: Season 4, Episode 13, “Final Grades”
<em>The Wire</em> Recap: Season 4, Episode 13, “Final Grades”

“I feel old. I been out there since I was 13. I ain’t never fucked up a count, never stole off a package, never did some shit that I wasn’t told to do. I been straight up. But what come back?”—Bodie Broadus

Bodie (JD Williams) fills the silence as he sits with Officer Jimmy McNulty (Dominic West) in a plant sanctuary so peaceful he wonders if they’re still in Baltimore. His lament sounds like that of a third-generation factory worker abandoned by the town’s only industry, or any other middle class foot soldier forced to confront the American Dream. Bodie agrees to flip on his boss, drug kingpin Marlo Stanfield (Jamie Hector), to protest the business policy that it’s better to kill a corner grunt than chance a disruption in the trade. When Marlo’s minions surround Bodie’s post that night, he grabs a gun and starts blasting, shouting, “I’m right here!” as his crew scatters. Bodie knows it’s the end, but he’s going to meet it standing on the corner he built.

The Wire Recap: Season 4, Episode 12, "That’s Got His Own"

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<em>The Wire</em> Recap: Season 4, Episode 12, “That’s Got His Own”
<em>The Wire</em> Recap: Season 4, Episode 12, “That’s Got His Own”

“You and your wife, you don’t have children, do you?” Assistant Principal Marcia Donnelly (Tootsie Duvall) coyly asks Prez (Jim True-Frost) after he strenuously objects to the promotion of Dukie (Jermaine Crawford) to high school. “Not yet, no,” Prez admits. “Well, have some,” she advises.

Prez, a first-year math teacher, has lavished attention on Dukie, providing him with showers, clean laundry, and lunch, none of which he gets in a home with the utilities shut off. Ms. Donnelly, though sympathetic to his impulse, lays out the practical boundaries of their mission. “You do your piece with them and you let them go, because there’ll be plenty more coming up behind Duquan.” Over lunch, Prez gamely tries to convince a dejected Dukie that he’s ready for the next level, offering continued access to the middle school’s showers and the class computer Dukie’s had to himself for a special project, but they both know his departure marks the end of the arrangement.

The Wire Recap: Season 4, Episode 11, "A New Day"

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<em>The Wire</em> Recap: Season 4, Episode 11, “A New Day”
<em>The Wire</em> Recap: Season 4, Episode 11, “A New Day”

“You’re telling me how I can’t do it, not how I can,” freshly minted Mayor Tommy Carcetti (Aidan Gillen) snaps at a city accountant who lists the impediments to giving the police a raise. Carcetti ambushes the offices of Baltimore’s various public works departments (one lounging around to the sounds of Men At Work) and orders respective remedies for an abandoned car, a playground hazard, and a leaky hydrant without disclosing specific locations, sending panicked city employees scurrying in search of a problem. He shows up at a police roll call to personally announce a pay hike and the termination of meaningless monthly quotas for arrests and citations (unlike the other city workers, the beat cops remain undeterred by the mayor’s eminence, pelting each other with verbal spitballs and sassing the new initiative’s staying power). Col. Cedric Daniels (Lance Reddick), tapped by Carcetti to make over the homicide division, joins his girlfriend, Assistant State’s Attorney Rhonda Pearlman (Deirdre Lovejoy), in addressing the detectives with the promise of “certain enhancements” and an ear for new ideas. “A new day,” Sgt. Jay Landsman (Delaney Williams) muses with a twinkle of skepticism as his colleagues swarm the new bosses with congratulations. “They make a nice couple anyway.”