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Tess Harper (#110 of 2)

Watch: Star-Studded “On Columbine” Video Reflects on Two Decades of Gun Violence

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Watch: Star-Studded “On Columbine” Video Reflects on Two Decades of Gun Violence
Watch: Star-Studded “On Columbine” Video Reflects on Two Decades of Gun Violence

The music video for “On Columbine,” a track from the star-studded concept album Guns: The Album, made its online premiere last March but understandably got lost in the flurry of media attention surrounding the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting and the historic March for Our Lives demonstrations that followed. The song, featuring singer-songwriter Claudio Parrone Jr., and its accompanying video are moving meditations on America's school shooting epidemic, featuring clips of three of the last four U.S. presidents lamenting the lives lost to gun violence (Donald Trump, meanwhile, can be heard, in a speech at the NRA last year, declaring an end to the “assault” on the Second Amendment).

Summer of ‘87: Ishtar: Truth As a Dangerous Business

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Summer of ‘87: <em>Ishtar</em>: Truth As a Dangerous Business
Summer of ‘87: <em>Ishtar</em>: Truth As a Dangerous Business

[Editor’s Note: This is the first entry in our annual “Summer of…” series, copresented by Aaron Aradillas, Jamey DuVall and Jerry Dennis of Blog Talk Radio’s Movie Geeks United! Ishtar was released in theaters on May 15th, 1987.]

Here’s a conspiracy theory for you: Ishtar is intentionally terrible. Director Elaine May, one half of the team that founded American improv, is too smart a writer to be this unintentionally inept. Numerous lines and gags support this notion, and the almost universally reviled Ishtar plays like a career suicide note. Here is a writer who no longer wants to direct, so she constructs a bomb with a self destruct sequence initiated by the equipment projecting her movie. This “goodbye, cruel world” aims to be a clever kiss-off à la George Sanders; instead it’s closer to Delroy Lindo’s famous graffiti in Spike Lee’s Clockers: “Bitch, you is dead.”