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On the Rise Brie Larson

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On the Rise: Brie Larson

Cinedigm

On the Rise: Brie Larson

If nothing else, 23-year-old Brie Larson exemplifies a trend within her generation of rising stars, who weave in and out of each other’s projects like they’re breathlessly party-hopping. In The Spectacular Now, Larson plays Cassidy, the ex-girlfriend of a reluctant hero played by 26-year-old Miles Teller, who’ll soon star in Divergent with 21-year-old Shailene Woodley, who’s also in The Spectacular Now, and is shooting The Fault in Our Stars (written by—what?—the guys who wrote The Spectacular Now). The new teen romance also features 28-year-old Mary Elizabeth Winstead, who played opposite Larson in Scott Pilgrim vs. The World, and 16-year-old Kaitlyn Dever, who’ll soon be seen with Larson in the forthcoming Short Term 12. Additionally, Short Term 12 features 29-year-old John Gallagher Jr., who stars on The Newsroom with 27-year-old Allison Pill, who’s also a Scott Pilgrim vs. The World alum. It’s all enough to spin the head of six-degrees king Kevin Bacon, who, come to think of it, just saw his signature movie, Footloose, remade with—wait for it—Miles Teller.

Understanding Screenwriting #35: Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, Bright Star, Whip It,

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Understanding Screenwriting #35: <em>Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs</em>, <em>Bright Star</em>, <em>Whip It</em>,
Understanding Screenwriting #35: <em>Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs</em>, <em>Bright Star</em>, <em>Whip It</em>,

Coming Up In This Column: Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, Bright Star, Whip It, The Phenix City Story, Georgia O’Keeffe, Mad Men (2), The Following Weeks of the 2009-2010 Television Season, but first:

Fan Mail: dfantico suggested the ways he would rewrite Law Abiding Citizen in his comments on US#34. I generally avoid telling people how to rewrite a script, although I sometimes fall into that trap. As a screenwriting instructor I try to not to tell students how to rewrite their scripts. I just point out the problems and let them figure it out. They learn more that way.

Since I did not do any comments on the comments on my piece “Talking Back to Documentaries,” let me just throw in a thanks to the people who wrote in on it. I was glad to give you some ideas of stuff to watch. I was particularly touched by the comments from joan, who seemed from the comments to be Betsy MacLane, the co-author of the textbook I use. Glad to know the class meets with your approval.

Fear Itself: “Community”

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<em>Fear Itself</em>: “Community”
<em>Fear Itself</em>: “Community”

Unemployed Superman Brandon Routh stars in the sixth episode of Fear Itself as a young husband and potential father who allows his wife’s (Shiri Appleby) enthusiasm for a home in an odd private community to blind him to the fine print on the sales contract. You see, though The Commons seems like a great place to live and raise your kids, it’s really a lot like Stepford, Connecticut or Kings Row where everyone hides behind painted smiles.

If you ever read any Ira Levin, Thomas Tryon, Shirley Jackson or Jack Finney, you’ll be able to predict every beat of this episode scripted by Kelly Kennemer and directed by American Psycho’s Mary Harron. This would not be a big deal were it ever really suspenseful, witty or scary but since it fails on all counts, we’re left looking at the bland story and just waiting for the obvious “shock” ending to drop, right out of Tryon’s Harvest Home but without the power of that novel’s symbolic castration.