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Film Comment Selects 2014: Me and You Review

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Film Comment Selects 2014: <em>Me and You</em> Review
Film Comment Selects 2014: <em>Me and You</em> Review

A complicated kinship, built out of divorce, offers a surprising safe haven for two narcissistic half-sibilings in Me and You, Bernardo Bertolucci’s first film in nearly a decade. As teenaged Lorenzo (Jacopo Olmo Antinori) unexpectedly becomes temporary roommates with his slightly older half-sister, Olivia (Tea Falco), during a week-long hideout in the storage basement of his mother’s apartment building, the fissions of their respective home lives—they have the same father—becomes more apparent, as do the curvatures of their sexual and psychological identities. Bertolluci, far from the romanticized juvenescence of The Dreamers, soberly details Lorenzo’s perversity, verbal antagonizing, and isolationism, and Olivia’s cold-turkey attempt to quit heroin, with his customarily vibrant, seasoned style that hums with both the regret of age and the uncertainty of youth.

15 Greatest MTV Video Music Awards Performances

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15 Greatest MTV Video Music Awards Performances
15 Greatest MTV Video Music Awards Performances

This Sunday marks the 30th annual MTV Video Music Awards. But this isn’t your father’s VMAs. After excising the words “Music Television” from its logo a few years back, and allowing viewers to vote for winners at its annual awards show, MTV has given its famous moonman award a temporary makeover (see above) to commemorate the ceremony’s move to Brooklyn’s Barclay’s Center. But one thing that hasn’t changed about the VMAs is the opportunity for show-stopping and iconic performances. From Britney’s snake to Madonna dressed as Marie Antoinette, we took a look back and picked 15 of our favorites.

Poster Lab: The Cabin in the Woods

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Poster Lab: The Cabin in the Woods
Poster Lab: The Cabin in the Woods

There wasn’t much to say about the initial poster for The Cabin in the Woods that wasn’t as plain as day in the image itself: “Oh, look at that. The house is twisted like a Rubik’s Cube. There must be puzzles afoot.” Nevertheless, the design proved to be one not easily forgotten, and highly amenable to, say, 3-D cardboard stand-ups for cineplex lobbies. Now, Lionsgate has wisely taken ownership of the image, as evidenced by the new one-sheet, recently revealed. Thanks to passerby double-takes and a swelling sea of buzz, that house is an emblem that can even work as a hollow shape, and while it may not be as iconic as The Blair Witch Project’s stickman, the powers that be are seeing to it that it’s on its way.

A heavy hitter on the festival circuit and overseas, The Cabin in the Woods has been met with a mess of early critical praise, which, given the cryptic plot details and banal TV spots, is thus far the most intriguing thing about it. The fire is then stoked with the new poster’s central detail—a jam-packed collection of more than 20 quoted raves. History has certainly shown that madness lies the way of trusting pithy blurbs stamped on film paraphernalia, but it’s exciting to see such enthusiasm emerge about a scary movie. Though largely drawn from London outlets, the quotes aren’t simply those of horror and genre gurus, who often give passes to titles that fail to grab a broader audience. The response suggests a widespread appeal, and it underscores an apparent mix of fright and comedy reminiscent of, as noted, The Evil Dead and Scream.