House Logo
Explore categories +

Scarlett Johansson (#110 of 20)

Check Out the Official U.S. Trailer and Poster for Jonathan Glazer’s Under the Skin

Comments Comments (...)

Check Out the Official U.S. Trailer and Poster for Jonathan Glazer’s <em>Under the Skin</em>
Check Out the Official U.S. Trailer and Poster for Jonathan Glazer’s <em>Under the Skin</em>

When cinephiles discuss films of the aughts that were mysteriously unloved or misunderstood, a title that often comes up is Jonathan Glazer’s Birth, a taboo tale crudely summarized as one of resurrection and cradle-robbing love. It was a bold work that required time for its formal merits to be processed and appreciated; however, few of its champions probably thought that they’d have to wait so long for a follow-up from the director. It’s been 10 whole years since Birth first bewitched us, and only now is the next entry in Glazer’s oeuvre within reach. Starring Scarlett Johansson in a performance that’s netting her international raves, Glazer’s Under the Skin looks to be an elliptical sci-fi flick of Kubrickian proportions, taking an intoxicatingly artful approach to the Species formula of a sexy, predatorial female alien (Johansson) roaming the earth. Yesterday, the film’s official cosmic one-sheet debuted. Today, A24 released its first U.S. trailer.

Oscar 2014 Nomination Predictions: Supporting Actress

Comments Comments (...)

Oscar 2014 Nomination Predictions: Supporting Actress
Oscar 2014 Nomination Predictions: Supporting Actress

When the Weinstein Company ultimately, and perhaps inevitably, retracted its decision to have August: Osage County star Meryl Streep campaign in the Supporting Actress category, it proved to be great news for Streep’s co-star Julia Roberts. Indeed, even August writer Tracy Letts claims Roberts’s part is a leading role, but debating category fraud is as futile as hoping Armond White won’t taint a New York Film Critics Circle awards ceremony, and given the competition, Roberts never would have landed a Best Actress nod anyway. But with Streep bumped into leading contention, Roberts seems to have become a Supporting Actress lock, not only because she steals the show with her bitiest turn since the one that won her an Oscar, but because she’s part of a smaller crowd in which she simply can’t be overlooked by her adoring peers. Some see Roberts as the wild card; I see her as an industry-beloved shoo-in.

New York Film Festival 2013: Her Review

Comments Comments (...)

New York Film Festival 2013: <em>Her</em> Review
New York Film Festival 2013: <em>Her</em> Review

A man falls in love with an operating system. Sounds like the makings of a biting satire on the supposed lack of human connection in the digital age. But one of the most surprising things about Spike Jonze’s new film, Her, is in how it steadfastly refuses to see this predicament from the cynical perspective one might expect. Plenty of ink has been spilled by now about the ways in which technology has had the effect of isolating people from one another even as some of those forms of technology—like Facebook, Twitter, and other forms of social media—have promised otherwise. With Her, it’s as if Jonze said at the outset of the film’s conception, “cynicism’s easy,” and decided not only to take the central romance at least halfway seriously, but to dare to suggest that there may actually be some legitimate validity in falling in love with artificial intelligence.

Toronto International Film Festival 2013 Jonathan Glazer’s Under the Skin

Comments Comments (...)

Toronto International Film Festival 2013: Under the Skin
Toronto International Film Festival 2013: Under the Skin

Jonathan Glazer’s first film since 2004’s Birth, Under the Skin has discernible reference points (2001: A Space Odyssey, The Man Who Fell to Earth, Chris Cunningham’s Rubber Johnny), and yet, this peculiar film is the most original feature at Toronto, and possibly of this year. It operates within a sublime netherworld immediately recognizable as being sprung from Glazer’s imagination, where, previously, the soul of a man was reborn in a 10-year-old boy and caused woman to nearly lose her mind, and before that, where a frightening, oft-hilarious psychopath wreaked havoc on the sanity of a man suffering an existential crisis over his former life as a criminal.

Now, in the gray, desolate coldness of Scotland, an extraterrestrial played by Scarlett Johansson seduces young Scottish men into a black hole where they meet a most unusual death. Given her pouty, coral-pink lips, chic black bob, alluring friendliness, and voluptuous breasts, the alien siren has little difficulty luring men back to “her place,” a decrepit building that, once inside, resembles the blanketing black nothingness of a virtual training game from The Matrix. Here, she walks into the darkness while slowly disrobing, the men following suit, unaware that the closer they reach her, the deeper they step into a never-ending inky ocean that swallows them whole.

Watch the Trailer for Spike Jonze’s Her, Starring Joaquin Phoenix

Comments Comments (...)

Watch the Trailer for Spike Jonze’s <em>Her</em>, Starring Joaquin Phoenix
Watch the Trailer for Spike Jonze’s <em>Her</em>, Starring Joaquin Phoenix

Watch the first trailer for Warner Bros.’s Her, a sci-fi romance directed by Spike Jonze and starring Joaquin Phoenix as a man who falls in love with an advanced Siri-like operating system named “Samantha” played by Scarlett Johansson, who reportedly replaced Samantha Morton earlier this year. According to the official synopsis, the film, Jonze’s first narrative feature since 2009’s Where the Wild Things Are, “explores the evolving nature—and the risks—of intimacy in the modern world.”

Poster Lab: The Bling Ring

Comments Comments (...)

Poster Lab: <em>The Bling Ring</em>
Poster Lab: <em>The Bling Ring</em>

First and foremost, the teaser poster for Sofia Coppola’s The Bling Ring exhibits the director’s bouncy, rebellious verve, which she’s always managed to balance with a good bit of melancholy. From The Virgin Suicides to Somewhere, Coppola has keenly mixed the dour with the glamorous, and rarely ever conveyed shallowness in the process. All of which bodes well for her latest, which recounts the real-life story of a band of adolescent thieves, who robbed the homes of Paris Hilton and her ilk, and sported their booty as if they themselves were rich socialites.

Many will acknowledge that this poster speaks to Coppola’s consistent interest and influence in the world of fashion, which is very much accurate. If not stylish enough in its own right, Marie Antoinette yielded an epic, in-character photo spread in the pages of Vogue, and Somewhere is essentially shaped around the goings-on of the Chateau Marmont, L.A.’s über-chic and legendary celebrity-friendly hotel. But one should suspect that fashion is just the veneer here. Like Harmony Korine’s Spring Breakers, which also teased an accessory-laden one-sheet, The Bling Ring looks primed to dig well beneath the stylish, stylistic duds, and expose a similarly provocative tale of our times, rife with youthful hedonism and its consequences.

SXSW 2013: Getting Back to Abnormal, This Ain’t No Mouse Music!, No More Road Trips?, & Don Jon

Comments Comments (...)

SXSW 2013: <em>Getting Back to Abnormal</em>, <em>This Ain’t No Mouse Music!</em>, <em>No More Road Trips?</em>, & <em>Don Jon</em>
SXSW 2013: <em>Getting Back to Abnormal</em>, <em>This Ain’t No Mouse Music!</em>, <em>No More Road Trips?</em>, & <em>Don Jon</em>

Geeky, admittedly devoid of tact, and first seen on a radio talk show in which a series of African-American callers accuse her of being a racist, Stacy Head makes an unlikely heroine. But that’s just what she proves to be, as Getting Back to Abnormal conducts a tour of the racial politics of New Orleans that’s as meandering and culturally rich as a second line parade.

The movie—and, it seems clear, Stacy’s political career—would never have ignited without a tireless little fireplug of a woman named Barbara Lacen-Keller, an African-American child of the projects who handles constituent outreach for Stacy and serves as her fiercest and best advocate. The four co-directors (Louis Alvarez, Andrew Kolker, Peter Odabashian, and Paul Stekler) bob in and out of Stacy’s and Barbara’s storyline, but they keep returning to the campaign as Stacy, the first white woman to represent the central city of New Orleans on the city council in 30 years, runs for reelection. Stacy’s and Barbara’s campaigning and the refreshingly frank, often moving stories they tell to the camera illuminate the chasm that yawns between the races in New Orleans—and the bridges that sometimes span that gap.

Oscar 2013 Winner Predictions Original Song

Comments Comments (...)

Oscar 2013 Winner Predictions: Original Song
Oscar 2013 Winner Predictions: Original Song

That there are once again five nominees in the category that, last year, only managed two (well, effectively one plus the lamprey nod necessary to make it an actual competition) means that the music branch’s restriction-crazed motion to this year only offer eligibility to songs whose lyrics are fully palindromic failed to pass muster with the Board of Governors. Instead, the size of the category is now simply dictated by the number of submissions like all the other vestigial categories, rather than by the arcane scoring system that last year revealed the music branch to be the only group whose stinginess with ratings rivals our own.