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Fox Searchlight (#110 of 7)

Watch the Trailer for Nicole Holofcener’s Enough Said, James Gandolfini’s Penultimate Film

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Watch the Trailer for Nicole Holofcener’s <em>Enough Said</em>, James Gandolfini’s Penultimate Film
Watch the Trailer for Nicole Holofcener’s <em>Enough Said</em>, James Gandolfini’s Penultimate Film

You can’t help but feel pangs of heartache watching the trailer for Nicole Holofcener’s Enough Said (below), the second-to-last film to feature James Gandolfini (his crime drama Animal Rescue is set for release in 2014). Such is the feeling that Fox Searchlight, who just unveiled the trailer, is surely hoping to elicit with the film itself, which only recently secured a firm release date (the movie opens in select theaters Sept. 20 before a wider rollout). Since Enough Said was previously unlisted on September release schedules, one could certainly presume that the indie studio has bumped it forward to cash in on Gandolfini grief, which feels a bit icky. But, then again, who doesn’t want to see Gandolfini back on screen ASAP, even posthumously, particularly in a film that seems to be, at least where he’s concerned, genuinely tender?

Oscar 2013 Winner Predictions Makeup and Hairstyling

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Oscar 2013 Winner Predictions: Makeup and Hairstyling
Oscar 2013 Winner Predictions: Makeup and Hairstyling

Last year, when The Iron Lady’s Mark Coulier and J. Roy Helland stole the makeup trophy from the team behind Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2, the win not only hinted at Meryl Streep’s eventual semi-shock of a Best Actress victory, it affirmed that one needn’t be the flashiest comer to claim this award. In the recent past, the Oscar here has gone to The Wolfman, Star Trek, and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, but it’s also been bestowed on Frida and La Vie en Rose, proving biopic metamorphosis can out-putty the extreme and the fanciful (the latter film beat out Norbit and Pirates of the Carribean: At World’s End). Such is good news for Howard Berger, Peter Montagna, and Martin Samuel, the trio of nominees who swelled Anthony Hopkins to twice his form for Hitchcock. Opinions of Hopkins’s transformation have been largely varied, with some hailing it as the suspense master’s resurrection and others finding the whole thing rather gross, but what’s certain is that the actor is all but gone beneath the makeup, which voters may see as a win-worthy feat.

Poster Lab: Darling Companion

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Poster Lab: <em>Darling Companion</em>
Poster Lab: <em>Darling Companion</em>

In general, this column isn’t designed to verbally tear bad posters in half, but when something as shoddy as the one-sheet for Darling Companion is put on the market, it’s pretty hard not to chime in. Almost shockingly unpolished, this blandly conceived fiasco reads like the rushed efforts of a first-day intern, who was tasked to cook up something to be shuffled out the door, and in an over-caffeinated panic, made a sinful hybrid of Lassie, The Devil Wears Prada and Martha Marcy May Marlene. Hell, maybe that leg even belongs to the intern’s boss, whose blurry blob of a platform heel recalls those digi-bras used in VH1’s “Movies That Rock” broadcast of Showgirls (come on, y’all know which ones I’m talking about).

It’s a good thing the intern remembered to include the collie, because this design otherwise reflects next to nothing that’s conveyed in the movie’s trailer, which promises over-50 ensemble kookiness, not working-woman minimalism. Maybe if that foot were wearing a saddle shoe and slacks, we might at least believe it belongs to lead star Diane Keaton. As is, it implies a tony glamazon who leaves Fido with a sitter. If there’s any half-decent design sense to speak of, it’s that the woman’s leg provides line quality and hugs the dog’s left side, thus offering a literal visual of the titular theme of pet-owner closeness. In all likelihood, though, it was probably just that poor intern’s way of scaling down the clipping-path duties, which, given the number that was done on the paw, was probably a blessing.

Poster Lab: Sound of My Voice

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Poster Lab: <em>Sound of My Voice</em>
Poster Lab: <em>Sound of My Voice</em>

Mystery seems to shroud every aspect of Fox Searchlight’s Sound of My Voice, a micro-budgeted curio snatched up by the specialty branch at Sundance 2011. Plenty of good ink followed the movie’s festival premiere (including a list-topping IndieWIRE citation), but try to find a great deal of official online content, and you’ll come up surprisingly short. The cryptic buzz continues with the release of the film’s second poster, a dog-eared and thrice-unfolded secret-handshake diagram, which relegates the sonar-style title to the bottom right corner.

The only way to gain an inkling as to what this drawing represents is to watch the 12-minute snippet Fox Searchlight unveiled on Thursday, showing the film’s entire opening chapter. Turns out there are all kinds of initiation rituals necessary to enter the movie’s cult microcosm, including the Miss Mary Mack action shown here, airline style.

I wouldn’t exactly rush to call this poster artful, but it’s certainly one of the more intriguing one-sheets to go viral this year, its WTF factor just as juicy as that of the best Being John Malkovich design, to which the wrinkled red hand signals hold a definite relation. Like Malkovich, Sound of My Voice also boasts time travel, but unless you chilled at Sundance or can beam yourself to April 27, precisely how remains, yes, rather mysterious.