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Fox Searchlight Pictures (#110 of 8)

Watch the Teaser Trailer for Yorgos Lanthimos’s The Favourite with Olivia Colman, Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz

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Watch the Teaser Trailer for Yorgos Lanthimos’s The Favourite with Olivia Colman, Emma Stone, and Rachel Weisz

Fox Searchlight Pictures

Watch the Teaser Trailer for Yorgos Lanthimos’s The Favourite with Olivia Colman, Emma Stone, and Rachel Weisz

The latest from Yorgos Lanthimos, The Favourite, takes us to the early 18th century, when England and France are at war. Not exactly the ideal time for levity, but this being a film from the Greek Weird Wave auteur behind Dogtooth and The Lobster, duck racing and pineapple eating are thriving. The film follows a frail Queen Anne (Olivia Colman), who sits on the throne of the England and sees her relationship to her friend, Lady Sarah (Rachel Weisz), tested upon the arrival of Sarah’s cousin, Abigail (Emma Stone).

Meet the Cast of Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs in a New Stop-Motion Interview

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Meet the Cast of Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs in a New Stop-Motion Interview

Fox Searchlight Pictures

Meet the Cast of Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs in a New Stop-Motion Interview

One week ahead of the limited theatrical release of Isle of Dogs, the film’s distributor, Fox Searchlight Pictures, has shared a five-minute animated companion short imagined and directed by Wes Anderson. No doubt an homage to Nick Park’s iconic Creature Comforts from 1989, the piece was shot in London over three months during the making of the film. It features the voices of Bryan Cranston, Bill Murray, Edward Norton, Liev Schreiber, Jeff Goldblum, Scarlett Johansson, Tilda Swinton, F. Murray Abraham, and Bob Balaban as animated dogs on set talking about their characters.

Isle of Dogs First Trailer: Wes Anderson’s Return to Stop-Motion Animation

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Isle of Dogs First Trailer: Wes Anderson’s Return to Stop-Motion Animation

Fox Searchlight Pictures

Isle of Dogs First Trailer: Wes Anderson’s Return to Stop-Motion Animation

“The Japanese archipelago, 20 years into the future,” intones the voice at the start of the delightful trailer for Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs, which sees the filmmaker returning to the world of stop-motion animation for the first time since 2009’s Fantastic Mr. Mox. Earlier this year, during a discussion about his carrer at ARTE Cinema, Anderson revealed that his follow-up to 2014’s The Grand Budapest Hotel was heavily inspired by the work of Akira Kurosawa, which is very much evident throughout the ornate trailer.

Box Office Rap Riddick and the Passion of Brian De Palma

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Box Office Rap: Riddick and the Passion of Brian De Palma
Box Office Rap: Riddick and the Passion of Brian De Palma

On May 22, 1996, Mission: Impossible opened in 3,012 North American movie theaters. That weekend, it made $45.4 million and marked the highest opening weekend ever for a Tom Cruise starrer, a record that would stand until Mission: Impossible II opened in May 2000. Cruise has since used that franchise as a staple for his box-office résumé, allowing him collaborations with the likes of J.J. Abrams and Brad Bird, with Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol marking the highest-grossing film of Cruise’s career with a whopping $694 million in global receipts.

But back to 1996. Then, that $45.4 million also marked the highest opening-weekend gross for director Brian De Palma; in fact, with the exclusion of The Untouchables, no prior De Palma film had made as much in its entire run as Mission: Impossible managed in just its first three days. The film was considered a critical success as well, receiving “two thumbs up” from Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert, though they, like several other critics, reserved most of their praise for Cruise’s performance and were skeptical of the film’s [sic] convoluted going’s on. Even in commercial success, De Palma’s fervid formal artistry has few boosters—an unfortunate trait that has inexplicably followed the great filmmaker’s entire career.

Poster Lab: Hitchcock

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Poster Lab: <em>Hitchcock</em>
Poster Lab: <em>Hitchcock</em>

The one-sheet for Hitchcock may turn out to be the 2012 poster that makes the strongest statement. More than just announcing a film’s release, this simplistic and darkly ironic ad marks a bold move for Fox Searchlight Pictures, and augments their reputation as a studio wont to crash the Oscar season with a surprise contender. Still in production as recently as this past spring, the movie, based on Stephen Rebello’s book Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho, wasn’t expected to be prepped as awards bait. It’s suddenly set to drop on November 23, and the poster serves as its coming-out party, brandishing the first peek of Anthony Hopkins as the portly suspense master.

As the movie, like the book, charts the lead-up to the release of Hitchcock’s most famous title, the poster loosely adopts the Psycho title font, which is aptly cocked to further imply a tinge of black comedy. It’s a tone directly reflective of the late auteur’s trademark film intros, which presented a harmless-looking host who gingerly welcomed viewers to scream their guts out. “Good evening,” reads the tagline on the dinner-party design, and the words have an irony all their own, as they’ve been uttered not only by Hitchcock, but by Hopkins in a memorable scene from Hannibal. It may not be fate, but it’s serendipitously spooky.

Poster Lab: Shame

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Poster Lab: <em>Shame</em>
Poster Lab: <em>Shame</em>

There’s minimalism, and then there’s a picture of a rumpled bed, which you are certainly intended to believe just witnessed the messy thrusting of Michael Fassbender’s sex addict, Brandon, into whichever conquest he finessed off the subway. The ultimate one sheet (aw, come on, there was no resisting that one), this decidedly unadorned beauty is going to make many billboards and building walls look alternately comfy and pathetic, and for New Yorkers who’ve seen the film, it’s going to make for quite the awkward moment when it’s the first thing viewed after stepping off the 1 train with a new date. “Have you seen that?” the date might ask, and the sudden relief that she hasn’t will wrap around you like a warm blanket.

As easy as it may be to cut this thing down for its near-Duchampian anti-artistry, it may just be the year’s most effective poster, wholly capturing the pitiful mood of the film in question, and taking on more shape and meaning as you look at it. What viewers should know is that it capitalizes on the very best shot of the film (the opening shot), which sees Brandon lying awake on this very bed, half-covered, looking so empty one might peer right through him to the linens. As the camera remains static, he gets up and opens the Venetians, shedding light on the sheets and revealing the film’s title as his daily grind (get it?) is recycled. More than offering the instant suggestion of sex, this image is all about ugly guilt, right down to the trivial, almost childish domestic no-no of failing to make the bed. Its color is as telling as anything else, as Brandon is one blue cat, and though the film isn’t as successful at establishing it, it’s clear here that his bed—or any bed, for that matter—is a hideous, odious villain.