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Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame (#110 of 8)

The 15 Greatest Nirvana Songs

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The 15 Greatest Nirvana Songs

Sub Pop

The 15 Greatest Nirvana Songs

The past few days have been a stark reminder of our fragile mortality. Not just because April 5th marked the 20th anniversary of Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain’s tragic death via a self-inflicted gunshot wound. But because tomorrow the band will be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, commemorating the 25th anniversary of their debut album, Bleach, released on iconic indie label Sub Pop in 1989. Feel old? Two years later, of course, the massive success of Nirvana’s sophomore effort, Nevermind, would help change the course of rock history. The band’s songs, the vast majority of which were penned solely by Cobain, fused pop, punk, and heavy metal into raw yet relatively digestible scraps of visceral rock poetry that struck just the right balance of accessible and challenging, introducing “alternative rock” to the masses, influencing an entire generation of musicians and fans, and—for better or worse—christening a new subgenre: grunge. Though Nirvana only lasted for seven years and three studio albums, Cobain, bassist Krist Novoselic, and drummer Dave Grohl were prolific enough to produce some of the greatest rock songs ever put to tape. Sal Cinquemani

Editor’s Note: Listen to the entire Nirvana playlist on Spotify.

FOX News Struggles to Define “Rock”

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FOX News Struggles to Define “Rock”
FOX News Struggles to Define “Rock”

Fox News’s Roger Friedman has called for a boycott of Rolling Stone. The magazine’s publisher, Jann Wenner, is also the founder of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and it seems Friedman is a little peeved by this year’s list of nominees for induction: Madonna, Beastie Boys, Leonard Cohen, Chic, Donna Summer, John Mellencamp, Afrika Bambaataa, Dave Clark Five, and The Ventures. Friedman’s chief complaint (though it’s hard to suss out an actual argument amidst all the racist, right-wing nonsensicality) seems to be that these artists don’t represent “rock” as defined by the white straight American male.

Friedman lists the R&B performers who have been left out in the cold (you know, like Tina Turner), but then illogically criticizes Chic’s nomination because they’re “not rock.” Yes, disco is gay. And yes, Friedman is apparently a homophobe. “Summer was a disco act. For her to get in before [Linda] Ronstadt is a joke. Mellencamp at least plays rock.” The litany of ignorant statements goes on ad nauseam: “Afrika Bambaataa and the Beastie Boys: Are they kidding? Even the latter must be laughing. They had one big hit, ’You’ve Got to Fight for Your Right to Party.’ The former, while I’m sure quite lovely, is a record-scratcher with a great name. Each of these belongs in a Rap Hall of Fame.” The assertion about the Beastie Boys could clearly only be made by someone who is unaware of the trio’s litany of successes and millions sold since that “one hit” 25 years ago (to which he graciously added five words to the title), while Summer and Bambaattaa are two of the most influential artists of the past three decades. The latter’s impact can still be heard on pop radio today.