House Logo
Explore categories +
The 10 Most-Read Slant Articles of 2017

5

Tribeca Film Festival Review: The Family I Had

The Family I Had isn’t slick: Revelations are sprung messily, almost randomly, as they often are in life. The film alternates intimate home-movie recordings, which show that Paris was a bomb waiting to detonate, with contemporary footage of Charity working with people affected by severe crimes, taking care of her new child, resonantly named Phoenix, and maintaining some semblance of a relationship with Paris, whom she resents and fears but has, remarkably, appeared to have forgiven. The Family I Had documents the transferrable perversities inherent in familial life, offering evidence to both sides of the debate of nature versus nurture, while exploring the awesome durability of love, which can become its own kind of prison. Bowen

Read more.

The 10 Most-Read Slant Articles of 2017

4

Album Review: Chris Brown’s Heartbreak on a Full Moon

The songs on Heartbreak on a Full Moon are neither amateurishly produced nor unlistenable. Many, in fact, have plenty of hooks, and only a few of which are borrowed directly from other artists. But these songs are also largely unmemorable, blending together into a two-and-a-half-hour murk of mechanical beats and plaintive, occasionally AutoTuned vocals. This isn’t OutKast’s Speakerboxxx/The Love Below, or even Nelly’s Sweatsuit, with different moods for each disc; it’s just one unbelievably long and same-y slog. Zachary Hoskins

Read more.

The 10 Most-Read Slant Articles of 2017

3

Game Review: Star Wars Battlefront II

When LucasArts was firmly in charge of developing their own line of Star Wars video games, quality control was a complete crapshoot. Sometimes the developer released winners, sometimes losers, and sometimes fascinating experiments that at least tried to do something different. It’s worth noting that 2005’s Star Wars: Battlefront II managed to straddle all three categories depending on which mode you played. That was a game crazy enough to try marrying respectably cool massive-scale multiplayer shootouts with a single-player campaign centered around a reading of a stormtrooper’s terrifying Order 66 war journal. The 2017 game bearing the same title is its complete creative opposite: a soulless pachinko machine where narrative depth, cooperation between friends, and the exhilaration of gameplay have all taken a backseat to the gaping Sarlacc-like maw of unadulterated greed. Justin Clark

Read more.

The 10 Most-Read Slant Articles of 2017

2

Film Review: Dunkirk

In devoting so much time to the dull, counterproductive construction of its action sequences, Dunkirk dispenses with nearly all other elements of drama. At first, this is to the film’s credit; the characters don’t waste time offering backstory or personality quirks, as they’re too focused on the immediacy of survival. In fact, most of the characters have names you can only glean from the credits, with the men becoming too preoccupied with their own skins to give a damn what the fellow next to them is called. After a time, however, the blurred lines between characters only exacerbate the editing’s cold, distancing effect. This inadvertently stunts the power of a few instances of interpersonal contact that do materialize, such as the traumatized soldier (Cillian Murphy) who’s picked up by Dawson (Mark Rylance) from a torpedoed ship—a subplot that’s so quickly sidelined that it barely gathers emotional force. Jake Cole

Read more.

The 10 Most-Read Slant Articles of 2017

1

Game Review: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

In Breath of the Wild, things appear to happen at random, so there’s pleasure in finding an item that makes your journey a less arduous one. A bow that can mightily shoot arrows across long distances feels like a godsend after having to make do with one that couldn’t help you get past the first round of a basic sharpshooting competition. But there comes a point in this game where its pleasures begin to feel like the engine of its tedium. Indeed, after you’ve traveled back and forth enough times through a particular territory, you can become desensitized to the sight of the same three or four types of animals—especially if you aren’t in any need of hunting them for their health-replenishing meat. You may even experience a sense of déjà vu while climbing yet another tower that, for the most part, isn’t that distinguishable from the last few you scaled in disparate parts of the game’s open world. Jed Pressgrove

Read more.

Previous

12