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Every Pixar Movie, Ranked from Worst to Best

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Every Pixar Movie, Ranked from Worst to Best

Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

Every Pixar Movie, Ranked from Worst to Best

Many of Pixar’s best films capture something truly elemental about the experience of being a child. Toy Story evoked the enduring emotional bond we have with our childhood toys. Monsters, Inc. played on our primal fear of the unknown. Inside Out gave voice to our bewildering tangle of emotions. And now Coco explores a similarly resonant theme: the tension between our family traditions and our burgeoning sense of personal identity. But the film embraces cultural specificity in a way that no other Pixar production has before, combining the studio’s customary emotional directness with a deep dive into a great nation’s art, music, history, and customs. On the occasion of the film’s release, join us in revisiting the Pixar canon, ranked from worst to best. Keith Watson

Hope and Chaos: The Sixth Annual Los Cabos International Film Festival

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Hope and Chaos: The Sixth Annual Los Cabos International Film Festival

Forager Films

Hope and Chaos: The Sixth Annual Los Cabos International Film Festival

Watching Australian director Jennifer Peedom's Mountain one morning at the sixth annual Los Cabos International Film Festival, I was struck by the fullness of the auditorium and by the prominence of children in the audience. Peedom's film is an essayistic documentary about humankind's relationship with mountains all over the world, with tender, ruefully poetic narration (spoken by Willem Dafoe) that emphasizes how our appreciation of nature can morph into an urge to conquer it, rendering the wild another of the controlled habitats from which we seek refuge. Mountain isn't what Americans would designate a “children's film,” as we have a habit of parking young ones in front of whatever A.D.D.-afflicted cartoon happens to be topping the box office at any given moment. It was gratifying to see such a varied audience turn out for Mountain, imparting hope as to the communal possibilities of cinema in the 21st century. Of course, many of the children were whispering and running around the theater, seemingly bored with the film in front of them, but at least they evinced some effort and curiosity.

AFI Fest 2017 Let the Corpses Tan, On Body and Soul, & Hannah

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AFI Fest 2017: Let the Corpses Tan, On Body and Soul, & Hannah

Kino Lorber

AFI Fest 2017: Let the Corpses Tan, On Body and Soul, & Hannah

For Let the Corpses Tan, Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani trade the giallo stylings of Amer and The Strange Color of Your Body's Tears for a wild heaping of spaghetti-western psychedelia. The married French filmmakers may be fixating on a new genre, but their deliriously abstract and meta approach to their craft remains intact. In fact, the shift in genre focus only gives them new objects and landscapes with which to play their formalist games.

Beginning with the sound of gunshots as paint splatters on a canvas, Cattet and Forzani announce their intent to elevate style above all else. What follows is a deliriously gleeful, rapid-fire montage of sound and image: extreme close-ups of burning cigars that threaten to set fire to the very image of the film, landscapes refracted through sunglasses or the flames of a lighter, the crackling of meat roasting over a fire, and enough creaking leather to make Kenneth Anger blush. Let the Corpses Tan is driven by sensory overload—its formal elements pieced together in rhythmic crescendos designed to titillate not with sex or violence, but through sheer cinematic inventiveness.

AFI Fest 2017 Sollers Point and Life and Nothing More

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AFI Fest 2017: Sollers Point and Life and Nothing More

The Hamilton Film Group

AFI Fest 2017: Sollers Point and Life and Nothing More

Director Matthew Porterfield's Sollers Point follows Keith (McCaul Lombardi), a low-level drug dealer serving the last week of his nine-month home detention after a short prison stint. He's stuck sharing a rundown one-story ranch house with his pestering father, Carol (Jim Belushi), in a predominantly white, lower-class corner of Baltimore. Graffiti and artwork cover Keith's bedroom walls—relics from a past when his artistic prowess hinted at a career and distracted him from the rough, drug-dealing crowds he eventually fell in with. Though Keith is ostensibly free once he gets his ankle bracelet taken off, the economically depressed neighborhood that he wanders through for the remainder of the film offers much of the same hopelessness and lack of opportunity that stymied him in prison.

Björk Blisses Out in Music Video for “Blissing Me”

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Björk Blisses Out in Music Video for “Blissing Me”

Santiago Felipe

Björk Blisses Out in Music Video for “Blissing Me”

Icelandic pop goddess Björk has released what is, perhaps, her most melodic song in years with “Blissing Me,” the second single from her forthcoming album Utopia. A thematic descendant of the artist's 1995 electronic hymn “Headphones,” the track is composed of a series of verses but no traditional hook, as Björk sings of trading MP3s with a fellow “music nerd” over a spare arrangement of harp and digital programming. The music and vocals grow more intricate as she becomes increasingly filled with doubt: “My woe and longing are too visceral/Did I just fall in love with love?”

American Horror Story: Cult Recap Episode 11, “Great Again”

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American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 11, “Great Again”
American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 11, “Great Again”

The season finale of American Horror Story: Cult, “Great Again,” ends on an unmistakably cathartic note. A red-pantsuit-clad Ally (Sarah Paulson), once a terrorized, fearful woman, is no longer willing to be seen as a victim or a survivor. Indeed, she stares down both the slick politician, Herbert Jackson (Dennis Cockrum), whose senate seat she seeks, and then the man who abused her, Kai Anderson (Evan Peters), telling him: “There is something more dangerous in this world than a humiliated man: a nasty woman.”

Review: Microsoft’s Xbox One X

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Review: Microsoft’s Xbox One X

Microsoft

Review: Microsoft’s Xbox One X

The future is sitting on my shelf right now. This premium console, sporting a highly advanced processor, can play games from across three generations of consoles. It also includes a drive for a brand new home-media disc format for watching movies and playing games at a higher resolution than we've ever seen. Yes, the PlayStation 3 was a special system all right, but it was one that was fraught with risk factors—from its exorbitant price to its betting the farm on A/V standards that only a fraction of its audience has adopted yet—and it's bizarre to watch Microsoft attempt all those same gambles in 2017 with the Xbox One X, considering how it turned out for Sony in 2006.

Curb Your Enthusiasm Recap Season 9, Episode 7, “Namaste”

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Curb Your Enthusiasm Recap: Season 9, Episode 7, “Namaste”

John P. Johnson/HBO

Curb Your Enthusiasm Recap: Season 9, Episode 7, “Namaste”

In last week's Curb Your Enthusiasm, Larry David briefly played the people's hero, standing up to self-righteous hostesses and ill-mannered travelers. In “Namaste,” he proudly reemerges as a shameless asshole and nuisance, which leads to some of the best—and worst—tussles of the season so far.

Eminem Previews Revival with “Walk on Water” featuring Beyoncé

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Eminem Previews Revival with “Walk on Water” featuring Beyoncé

Interscope Records

Eminem Previews Revival with “Walk on Water” featuring Beyoncé

Just a week before his ninth album, Revival, is set to be released, Eminem is finally giving us a preview of his first solo effort in four years. Produced by Rick Rubin, “Walk on Water” features a sparse arrangement of keyboards and strings and a gospel-influenced hook courtesy of Beyoncé. The single is both contemplative and combative, with Em offering a glimpse into his creative process: “The rhyme has to be perfect, the delivery flawless/And it always feels like I'm hittin' the mark/'Til I go sit in the car and pick it apart.” The rapper chronicles his battles with success, drug addition, and inevitable “sales decline,” growing more bellicose as he declares he'll be the one to decide when he takes his final bow. Even at 45, Eminem admits he's still “at times juvenile,” eschewing political correctness with epithets like “retarded” and boasts about his writing credits (“Bitch, I wrote 'Stan'!”).

American Horror Story: Cult Recap Episode 10, “Charles (Manson) in Charge”

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American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 10, “Charles (Manson) in Charge”
American Horror Story: Cult Recap: Episode 10, “Charles (Manson) in Charge”

In so fervently, even humanely, leaning into Kai's (Evan Peters) madness as it once did into Ally's (Sarah Paulson), “Charles (Manson) in Charge” manages to get back to the inspired lunacy of American Horror Story: Cult's first few episodes and reclaim a sense of purpose, one that puts character development on a level playing field with political provocation. The flashbacks are no longer misleading or disconnected and the aesthetics are, while still dissonant, lush with meaning, as in the framing of bodies and use of mirrors that stress both Kai's fraught connection to his sister, Winter (Billie Lourd), as well as his psychic break from reality.