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Alex Cox’s Straight to Hell Lives Again

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Alex Cox’s Straight to Hell Lives Again

Kino Lorber

Alex Cox’s Straight to Hell Lives Again

Alex Cox’s punk western Straight to Hell, long out of print on home video, has been dug up from the dregs of oblivion by Kino Lorber and handsomely given a long-overdue director’s cut Blu-ray treatment. This is less the preservation of a cult classic than of a significant artifact of 1980s indie cinema. The film, which suggests an obscure B-side from a fascinating filmmaker who was probably a recalcitrant iconoclast to his detriment. Cox’s Repo Man and Sid & Nancy are now recognized by many as classics of the period—as punk in their approach as in their subject matter. Yet Straight to Hell replies to the raves of those films in the same way Sid Vicious did to dignified applause in Julian Temple’s The Great Rock ‘n’ Roll Swindle, taking out a revolver and firing into a bourgeois audience.

Netflix Drops Trailer for The Other Side of the Wind, Orson Welles’s Last Film

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Netflix Releases Trailer for The Other Side of the Wind, Orson Welles’s Last Film

Netflix

Netflix Releases Trailer for The Other Side of the Wind, Orson Welles’s Last Film

Ahead of The Other Side of the Wind’s world premiere at the Venice Film Festival, Netflix has released the trailer for Orson Welles’s unfinished last film, which has been called a Holy Grail of cinema. Indeed, anyone who has followed the ups and downs of this film’s release will not consider it hyperbole that this has been “an event over 40 years in the making.”

Locarno Film Festival 2018 Ray & Liz, M, & Menocchio

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Locarno Film Festival 2018: Ray & Liz, M, & Menocchio

Locarno Film Festival

Locarno Film Festival 2018: Ray & Liz, M, & Menocchio

During my brief stint at Locarno, I managed to catch 10 of the 15 films selected for this year’s international competition. My favorite was Ray & Liz, British artist Richard Billingham’s remarkably assured autobiographical debut feature. Billingham rose to prominence as a photographer with his 1996 monograph Ray’s a Laugh, inspired by his impoverished upbringing on the outskirts of Birmingham and lauded for its unflinching portraits of his alcoholic father and sedentary, heavily tattooed mother. With this film, he reaches further into the dark recesses of his childhood to deliver a richly evocative portrait of working-class life in the British Midlands.

Locarno Film Festival 2018 Genesis, Glaubenberg, & Too Late to Die Young

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Locarno Film Festival 2018: Genesis, Glaubenberg, & Too Late to Die Young

Locarno Film Festival

Locarno Film Festival 2018: Genesis, Glaubenberg, & Too Late to Die Young

Growing pains and burgeoning sexual identity take center stage in several titles duking it out for the Pardo d’Oro, or Golden Leopard, at this year’s Locarno Film Festival. Of these, Genesis, a multi-stranded meditation on the joy and misery of adolescence by Canadian writer-director Philippe Lesage, seems most likely to find an audience beyond the festival circuit. The film focuses largely on the relationship woes of a pair of privileged step-siblings living in suburban French Canada: Guillaume (Théodore Pellerin), a preppy, quick-witted class clown at an all-boys boarding school, secretly harboring feelings for his best friend, Nicolas (Jules Roy Sicotte), and Charlotte (Noée Abita), who feels she’s outgrown her noncommittal boyfriend, Maxime (Pier-Luc Funk), and sets off looking for love in all the wrong places.

Review: Young Jean Lee’s Straight White Men Is a Deconstruction of Privilege

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Review: Young Jean Lee’s Straight White Men Is a Deconstruction of Privilege’

Joan Marcus

Review: Young Jean Lee’s Straight White Men Is a Deconstruction of Privilege’

The four main performers in Young Jean Lee’s provocative and hilarious play Straight White Men are precisely attuned, like the members of a string quartet, playing off each other to create something richer than the sum of their parts. They’re a true ensemble, though some are stars in their own rights: Josh Charles plays Jake, a divorced banker; Armie Hammer plays Drew, an acclaimed novelist; and Paul Schneider plays Matt, one-time valedictorian, Harvard man, and hardcore communist, now a temp living back at home, crushed by student-loan debt. All three are brothers, home for Christmas to see their widower father, Ed, played with gruff joviality by Stephen Payne.

56th New York Film Festival Unveils Main Slate: Barry Jenkins, Claire Denis, Alex Ross Perry, Jean-Luc Godard in Lineup

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56th New York Film Festival Unveils Main Slate: Barry Jenkins, Claire Denis, Alex Ross Perry, Jean-Luc Godard in Lineup

Thunderbird Releasing

56th New York Film Festival Unveils Main Slate: Barry Jenkins, Claire Denis, Alex Ross Perry, Jean-Luc Godard in Lineup

Today, the Film Society of Lincoln Center’s New York Film Festival announced its main slate of films for this year’s event. On July 18, the festival announced Roma, Alfonso Cuarón’s first film since Gravity, as its centerpiece selection. Since then, Yorgos Lanthithos’s The Favourite was announced as the opening-night film and Julian Schnabel’s At Eternity’s Gate, about the last days of Vincent van Gogh and starring Willem Dafoe in the leading role, as the festival’s closer. Below is the full lineup of 30 films from 22 countries.

Robyn’s New Single, “Missing U,” Nearly Misses the Mark

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Robyn’s New Single, “Missing U,” Nearly Misses the Mark

Mark Peckmezian/Interscope Records

Robyn’s New Single, “Missing U,” Nearly Misses the Mark

Today, Swedish singer Robyn dropped “Missing U,” her first solo single in eight years. Over the last several years, the cult pop star has released a series of collaborative EPs, but the new track is the first official taste of her follow-up to 2010’s Body Talk. (A snippet of another new track, “Honey,” was featured in an episode of the final season of HBO’s Girls last year.)

Ariana Grande Drops Epic Music Video for Feminist Anthem “God Is a Woman”

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Ariana Grande Drops Epic Music Video for Feminist Anthem “God Is a Woman”

Republic Records

Ariana Grande Drops Epic Music Video for Feminist Anthem “God Is a Woman”

Just hours after she released “God Is a Woman,” a sultry, subtly reggae-infused slow jam from her forthcoming album Sweetener, Ariana Grande has dropped an epic music video for the single. The clip finds the singer hula-hooping with the Milky Way, fingering the eye of a hurricane, and deflecting misogynist epithets, a visual embodiment of her declaration that “I can be all the things you told me not to be/When you try to come for me, I keep on flourishing/And he sees the universe when I’m in company/It’s all in me.”

Interview: Kate Bornstein on Their Broadway Debut in Straight White Men

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Interview: Kate Bornstein on Their Broadway Debut in Straight White Men

Santiago Felipe

Interview: Kate Bornstein on Their Broadway Debut in Straight White Men

When Kate Bornstein, self-described as a non-binary femme-identified trans person, talks about their remarkable life journey, it’s clear that at 70, the trail-blazing author of the seminal work Gender Outlaw and subject of the documentary Kate Bornstein Is a Queer and Pleasant Danger is still a formidable force to be reckoned with. Bornstein isn’t content on resting on their laurels as a pioneer in transgender rights and acceptance, acknowledging that positions they once held are always subject to reassessment. As the reader will learn from our interview, Bornstein, who’s debuting on Broadway in the new Second Stage production of Straight White Men, is uniquely positioned to broaden our vision on gender in a rapidly evolving world.

Interview: Ivo van Hove on Adapting Visconti’s The Damned for the Stage

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Interview: Ivo van Hove on Adapting Visconti’s The Damned for the Stage

Jan Versweyveld

Interview: Ivo van Hove on Adapting Visconti’s The Damned for the Stage

There are no half measures with Ivo van Hove. Whether he’s revisiting modern classics like Arthur Miller’s A View from the Bridge and The Crucible, or premiering David Bowie’s musical Lazarus, you can expect riveting—and in some instances controversial—theater fare from the Belgian-born director. So there’s great anticipation for his latest New York production: an epic staging of The Damned at the Park Avenue Armory, which runs from July 17 to 28.

The production, created for the Comédie-Française theater in Paris, premiered two summers ago at the Festival d’Avignon and is adapted from the Oscar-nominated screenplay for the 1969 film by Italian auteur Luchino Visconti. An operatic tale of decadence and greed, The Damned recounts the internecine struggles and disintegration of the powerful von Essenbeck family as they collude with the rising Nazi regime in 1930s Germany.

Hailed as a visionary, and sometimes dismissed as a provocateur, van Hove is currently in great demand in theater capitals across the globe. His upcoming international projects include the world-premiere stage adaptation of Hanya Yanagihara’s A Little Life, opening in September at the Toneelgroep Amsterdam, van Hove’s home-theater base; a new adaptation of All About Eve, set to premiere next February in London’s West End; and Électre/Oreste, a combination of two Euripides plays that will be presented next Summer at the ancient Epidaurus theater in Greece. And it’s just been announced that van Hove will helm a new interpretation of the classic American musical West Side Story, slated for Broadway at the end of next year.

Recently, I had the chance to sit down with van Hove and talk about the experience of bringing new life to Visconti’s provocative The Damned.