Murder, My Sweet

Murder, My Sweet

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According to the commentary track included on Warner Bros.‘s new Film Noir Collection release of Murder, My Sweet, inimitable pulp novelist Raymond Chandler crocheted the busy, multiple levels of narrative for Farewell, My Lovely (the original title) from three different short stories. This approach actually pays off in the novel (reportedly Chandler’s favorite of his own work), as Marlowe is a quintessential wise guy who finds himself in the right place at the wrong time. Using cynicism as a disguise for Marlowe’s deeply-hidden sense of moral chivalry, Chandler’s novels define plot as nothing more highfalutin than simply what happens to the progressively more drawn in private investigator. Mood, setting, and character (or, rather, caricature) are what Chandler means to explicate. And Murder, My Sweet, Edward Dmytryk’s 1945 RKO adaptation of the novel (with Dick Powell playing the P.I. as a past-his-prime looker), follows that blueprint rather well. John Paxton’s screenplay excises at least half of the subplot from Chandler’s text, but he leaves in a fair amount of his juicy dialogue. (You know, the “she was a washed-up middle-aged woman with a face of mud” stuff.) A rogue’s gallery of character actors do justice to Chandler’s underworld of horny old men, homosexual middle-aged ones, and young sweets of undecided moral standing, but what really fills out the film, though, is Dmytryk’s jazzy application of Orson Welles’s RKO set-design. While nowhere near as lattice-happy or deep-focused as Welles’s work, Dmytryk takes noticeable relish in choreographing mug-on-thug-on-lug) power struggles through shifting light patterns (the climactic scene where Claire Trevor keeps switching off lamps and creating gulfs of black space), tracking shots, and even a risky-if-blatant surrealistic dream sequence with melting stairway banisters and menacing cobwebs. It’s one of the rare film noirs where the visual panache almost matches the stoolie loquaciousness (Kiss Me Deadly remains the champ). What doesn’t quite wash about Chandler’s worldview is the convenient, almost flippant resolution, a tossed-off nod to happily-ever-after matrimony, and a Madonna-Whore view of women that Chandler, even at his worst, was capable of rising above.

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DVD
Distributor
Warner Bros.
Runtime
95 min
Rating
NR
Year
1945
Director
Edward Dmytryk
Screenwriter
John Paxton
Cast
Dick Powell, Claire Trevor, Anne Shirley, Otto Kruger, Don Douglas