Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star

Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star

2.0 out of 52.0 out of 52.0 out of 52.0 out of 5 2.0

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A star vehicle for SNL alum and “Spin City” creep David Spade, Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star looks to shed light on the child actor syndrome that has produced many victims but very few survivors. The eponymous has-been actor Spade plays in the film was the star of the fictional ‘70s sitcom “The Glimmer Gang,” which had him playing a wise-cracking tyke (essentially Dennis the Menace by way of Macaulay Culkin) whose famous catchphrase was “Nucking Futs.” (The film’s timing couldn’t be any more serendipitous, opening the same week as Party Monster, which resuscitates Culkin from a nine-year acting hiatus as gay club killer Michael Alig.) The film catalogs Dickie’s attempts to recreate his childhood at the request of Rob Reiner in an elaborate attempt to land a part in the director’s hot new project. (Apparently Dickie hasn’t seen Alex and Emma.) Dickie Roberts begins as an E! True Hollywood story, and as such is every bit as self-conscious as it is vanilla. The lame special appearances by endless former child stars seemingly exist to please the nostalgia wanker. Danny Bonaduce, Corey Feldman and Dustin Diamond are among Dickie’s poker buddies, and Barry Williams dutifully embarrasses himself by lamely referencing his career highpoint by pulling out the Brady Tiki idol that once hung from his neck. There are two films at war here: the satire Spade and ex-SNL writer Fred Wolf want it to be (there are bright spots here, including a hysterical and genuinely sweet sequence that gives it to the Britneys of the world who don’t want to act their age) and the bad TV sitcom facsimile it becomes when Dickie realizes that love is more important than fame. The problem with Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star is that it doesn’t understand (but should) that Emmanuel Lewis kicking the shit out of someone is nowhere near as funny as Emmanuel Lewis himself. Dickie wants the second coming John Travolta made for himself but doesn’t realize that maybe Look Who’s Talking should have put Travolta out of commission for good.

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DVD | Soundtrack
Distributor
Paramount Pictures
Runtime
98 min
Rating
PG-13
Year
2003
Director
Sam Weisman
Screenwriter
David Spade, Fred Wolf
Cast
David Spade, Ashley Edner, Scott Terra, Willie Aames, Craig Bierko, Danny Bonaduce, Jenna Boyd, Rachel Dratch, Jeff Chase, Corey Feldman, Dustin Diamond, Emmanuel Lewis, Leif Garrett, Jon Lovitz, Edie McClurg