Angel Eyes

Angel Eyes

2.5 out of 5 2.5 out of 5 2.5 out of 5 2.5 out of 5 2.5

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What with its cryptic storytelling, otherworldly pacing and doe-eyed little boys, Luis Mandoki’s Angel Eyes could pass for a lost M. Night Shyamalan film. The B-movie opening has Sharon Pogue (Jennifer Lopez), a Chicago police officer, overseeing a brutal car accident. A year later, when the mysterious Catch (Jim Caviezel) appears wandering Chicago staring into people’s souls, Sharon’s still on the police beat, and amid gunfire, they meet-cute and soon start going out. Mandoki and screenwriter Gerald Di Pego are careful about preserving whatever it is the story has up its sleeve, and as such Angel Eyes can border on the cagey, mostly when the focus shifts away from Catch and Sharon sucking face and onto Catch’s mysterious abilities. Late cinematographer Piotr Sobocinski, best known for his stunning work on Kieślowski’s Red, drenches the grief-stricken world of the film’s main characters in vivid colors, and since Catch gets all the mellow blues, his scenes sometimes feel like deleted sequences from Shyamalan’s Unbreakable. Marco Beltrami’s score is criminal but the overall effect of the film is sometimes exquisite as Catch and Sharon’s relationship is given the feel of a supernatural encounter. The film keeps you guessing without making you feel teased.

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DVD | Soundtrack
Distributor
Warner Bros.
Runtime
103 min
Rating
R
Year
2001
Director
Luis Mandoki
Screenwriter
Gerald Di Pego
Cast
Jennifer Lopez, Jim Caviezel, Sonia Braga, Jeremy Sisto, Victor Argo, Terrence Dashon Howard, Alfonso Arau