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Every Cannes Palme d’Or Winner of the 2000s Ranked

Every Cannes Palme d’Or Winner of the 2000s Ranked

 

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There's a certain formula that often defines the recipients of the Cannes Film Festival's prestigious top prize, the Palme d'Or. These films, in recent years especially, tend to have a sense of importance about them (Fahrenheit 9/11), frequently due to their sociopolitical awareness of the world (The Class), or of specific societal ills (4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days). Very occasionally, the Palme d'Or goes to a bold, experimental, and divisive vision from a well-liked auteur (Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives), but more often it's awarded to a film in the lineup that the most people on the Cannes jury can probably agree is good (I, Daniel Blake). And in less than three weeks, we'll see if this year's Cannes jury, presided over by Cate Blanchett, will follow any sort of predictable formula when it announces its winners.

You'll find us on the Croisette next week, covering some of the biggest titles in this year's Cannes lineup. And prior to closing night, we'll offer our predictions as to what we think will win in all the top categories. Until then, enjoy our ranking of every Palme d'Or winner from the 21st century. Sam C. Mac

Every Cannes Palme d’Or Winner of the 2000s Ranked

18

The Son’s Room (2001)

Halfway through The Son's Room, director Nanni Moretti shifts the rhetoric of his narrative away from an exaggerated view of happy domesticity and into a realm of weepy melodrama. Psychiatrist Giovanni (Moretti) is a perfect father and husband: he helps his daughter with her Latin homework (perducto means “without hardship you will be guided”—wink, wink); allows her boyfriend to exalt grass (when high, the boy says he's “looking at the universe”); and initiates group lip-synching during the family's car trips. Nicola Piovani's score grotesquely heightens the joy behind every smile, meaning disaster is inevitable. As Moretti delves deeper into Giovanni's work, focus is shifted away from the family arena. Though the film blooms when Paola (Laura Morante) and the family seek comfort in Andrea's (Giuseppe Sanfelice) death by connecting with a girl their son met at summer camp, Paola remains a cipher throughout. Cue Brian Eno's “By This River,” which blares from a car radio as the family stands near the sea that killed their Andrea: “Here we are stuck by this river/You and I underneath a sky/That's ever falling down, down, down.” In this one stoic moment, not only does the family seemingly escape their grief but also the Rob Reiner soap opera Moretti trapped them in. Ed Gonzalez

Every Cannes Palme d’Or Winner of the 2000s Ranked

17

Fahrenheit 9/11 (2004)

A mediocre director but a master PR man, Michael Moore is the father of the Happy Meal documentary: big fonts, quick-fire montages, celebrity cameos, causing elaborate scenes. Fahrenheit 9/11 is no less an attention-grabbing stunt than his Bowling for Columbine, but what a scene it is. At the time of its release, Moore's compilation of the Bush I administration's bamboozling of the American public in the wake of 9/11. More than 10 years after its release, though, what lingers most about the film is Moore's self-aggrandizement and forced sanctimoniousness (he rah-rahs from the sidelines when an interviewee says something he agrees with, and you sometimes get a sense that he wouldn't call a dying man an ambulance if it meant getting the money shot of the guy croaking). At least it's some kind of mercy that he spends very little time on screen. Gonzalez

Every Cannes Palme d’Or Winner of the 2000s Ranked

16

Amour (2012)

There's a deceptiveness lurking deep within Amour, an insincerity that colors the drama, recasting it as a ploy. Whereas across earlier films Michael Haneke's predilection for deceit served a high-minded, if still somewhat suspect, intellectual purpose (an interrogation of privilege and meaning in Caché, the deconstruction of genre in both versions of Funny Games, and so on), here his disingenuous approach is not only unwarranted, but is actually at odds with the tone and tenor of the drama. This suggests two possibilities: Either Haneke has attempted to shear his sensibility of trickery and failed to do so convincingly, or he has made an experiment in manipulation and feigned empathy so exacting and oblique that nobody has understood its real purpose (I wouldn't put the latter past him). Either way, Amour intends to dupe us, to feed on our own pain and suffering. Moved to tears or scared to death, we'd all lose our dignity in the end. Calum Marsh

Every Cannes Palme d’Or Winner of the 2000s Ranked

15

I, Daniel Blake (2016)

English stand-up comedian Dave Johns brings the sort of spontaneous energy to his eponymous character that's consistently made Loach's films worth keeping up with. But Blake's storyline veers from its emotionally grounded setup and into grandstanding displays like the Michael Moore-worthy stunt from which I, Daniel Blake takes its title. Both principal actors have a strong enough sense of their characters, even as they're pulled into increasingly harrowing places, to make the film a more successful one than Loach's last few, but it's still schematic and predictable, and it aggressively stacks the deck against Blake and Kattie (Hayley Squires) in a way that makes it more effective as social activism, and less so as drama. The Loach of two or three decades ago, who made intimate, naturalistic films about the working class, like 1969's Kes and 1994's Ladybird Ladybird, is distinctly different from the Loach of today—and the soapbox-prone I, Daniel Blake reaffirms how unlikely it is for that to change. Mac

Every Cannes Palme d’Or Winner of the 2000s Ranked

14

The Class (2008)

When a plot finally emerges, it's all about the quandaries of privileging principle (and principal) or empiricism, duty or personal preference, questions that have been implicit all along, even in kids' protests that they're always being picked on or favored. As a clever late twist suggests, the interactions themselves are almost all riffs on Socratic debates—usually, the teacher seems to be asking students to verify their claims so he can give himself time to rebut—and as director Laurent Cantet said at The Class's New York Film Festival press conference, the school's a place “where democracy is at stake.” Instead of the usual righteous monologues, this is a film of dialogue and dialogues, in which the bickering teachers' conferences begin to echo the kids' troublemaking and skepticism but for the adults' pretense of understanding and decorum (everyone, in any case, has their reason and handily states it in close-up). It would make a perfect, though not particularly good, double feature with Frederick Wiseman's documentary State Legislature or Advise and Consent. David Phelps

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