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Links for the Day: The Essential Labor Films, Masters of Sex Has Become Surprisingly Topical, Tom Schiller Interview, Pasolini Trailer, & More

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Links for the Day: The Essential Labor Films, Masters of Sex Has Become Surprisingly Topical, Tom Schiller Interview, Pasolini Trailer, & More

1. “The Essential Labor Films.” Ella Taylor, for Fandor, on the must-see movies of the working world.

“Is manual labor dying? For that matter, is the job as we know it on its way out the door? What does it feel like to work fifteen-hour days sewing jeans in Guangzhou for large-waisted Westerners—and then get laid off by recession? Exactly who were those guys who blew up the world economy in 2008? Did Mark Zuckerberg really invent Facebook because he didn’t get the girl? Why do we love procedurals? What the hell is ’women’s work?’ Can a Parisian rat aspire to gourmet chef? And last but by no means least, can I please have that striped power suit Rosalind Russell wore to get the story and reel in Cary Grant in His Girl Friday? Among the twenty-five films I’ve chosen to honor Labor Day you won’t find Man With a Movie Camera, or Modern Times, or even anything by that fly-on-the-wall of the working world, Fred Wiseman. Not because they don’t belong, but because this isn’t a top twenty-five list. It’s a blend of the canonical, the catholic and the idiosyncratic—a personal best culled from movies that speak to the pressing concerns of our age. Some chart the great changes that have rolled over our working world—global corporatism, marvelous innovation, alienation, unemployment, class inequality and conflict, environmental ruin. Others parse their meanings of these shifts, or draw beauty from ugliness or rage against the machine. Still others dwell on work undertaken for love of labor or fellow human beings.”

2. “Jennifer Lawrence Nude Photo Leak Isn’t A Scandal. It’s A Sex Crime.” Forbes’s Scott Mendelson on the nude photo leak that’s targeted Lawrence and other celebrities.

“It is not the responsibility of our female population to take ’X’ number of steps to lessen the chance that a member of our male population will engage in untoward conduct towards them, be it assault or street harassment. As a society, we deal with violence, especially sexual violence, against women in much the wrongheaded manner that we have fought the war on drugs. We focus on the supply-side, with an emphasis on the things that women must do to ’stay safe’ instead of focusing on lessening mens’ ’demand’ to view women as purely a disposable commodity. In short, we emphasize how women can prevent being assaulted instead of telling men and boys not to assault women in the first place. Instead of condemning those who would steal the private photographs and publish them online for all to see, we condemn or belittle the women who chose to create said private photographs in the first place. Ms. Lawrence, Ms. Winstead, and the like have absolutely nothing to apologize for. They have not been scandalized, but rather victimized.”

3. “With the Unrest in Ferguson, Masters of Sex Has Become Surprisingly Topical.” Slate’s Dee Lockett on how the show offers some historical context for what’s happening in Ferguson now.

“Just how little Masters cares about historical progress comes to light when a black reporter tries to write about both him and his sex study for the St. Louis Chronicle. After she inquires about his firings by two previous hospitals, Masters goes to the paper’s editor to make him pull a story that could ’paint him as an ostracized and unstable figure.’ If they run such a story, he says, he’ll publish a study that claims to validate widely held stereotypes about black people—that they have larger penises, greater sexual appetite, and elevated testosterone levels.”

4. “Some Things Last a Long Time.” Alex Pappademas chats with founding SNL writer Tom Schiller about the secret history of the show’s short films.

“Albert Brooks did some terrific films, but they were so long. They were like five minutes, seven, and they became longer and longer. The ideal length for a film on that show, I discovered, was two and a half minutes. That’s as long as you could sustain someone’s interest without imposing on the show. Also, it’s a challenge to do a beginning, middle, and end in two and a half minutes. Anyway, some of it got so long that they stopped using Albert Brooks. Then they used a guy named Gary Weis, who I knew from growing up in L.A. at Topanga Beach. He was a surfer, but he used to make films and show them to the surfers. One of them was an airplane flying overhead, and then he superimposed a seagull flying at the same time, a double image, and he showed this to the surfers, and they were like, ’Oh, wow, man, that’s good.’ Not to knock him—he did do some really sweet films for that show. And then I don’t know what happened. I guess he moved on, and it was my turn. My first one was called ’The Acid Generation: Where Are They Now?’ It was all these old people remembering Jimi Hendrix as if it was yesterday. So that was the joke. I shot it in Venice [California] in an old people’s home.”

5. “Bombast: Kim’s Video.” Nick Pinkerton on his time working for the now-defunct video store.

“My attitude was not a problem at Avenue A, where surliness was part of the uniform—in the space of six weeks, my attitude had even improved, and I had rocketed up the ranks to the post of assistant manager, thanks in large part to my aggressive, enthusiastic expansion of the Auteurs section. (I added ’André de Toth.’) The concurrent pay raise kicked my salary up to the princely sum of $6.00, paid weekly in a crisp white envelope, cash on the barrelhead. On a 40-hour week, that meant take-home pay of $240, and astonishing as this now may seem, this was somehow enough to live off of in New York City, thanks to my being possessed of a young person’s ability to contently live like an animal. I was sustained by an affordable cheese slice across the street, twofer drinks specials at Opaline, a neighboring basement bar whose claim to fame was their underwear dance parties, and 99-cent, 16-ounce Hollandias—a pissy Heineken knockoff lager—at the bodega on the way home.”

Video of the Day: The trailer for Abel Ferrara’s Pasolini:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rAUoGIqhidM
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Watch: The Long-Awaited Deadwood Movie Gets Teaser Trailer and Premiere Date

Welcome to fucking Deadwood!

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Deadwood
Photo: HBO

At long last, we’re finally going to see more of Deadwood. Very soon after the HBO series’s cancellation in 2006, creator David Milch announced that he agreed to produce a pair of two-hour films to tie up the loose ends left after the third season. It’s been a long road since, and after many false starts over the years, production on one standalone film started in fall 2018. And today we have a glorious teaser for the film, which releases on HBO on May 31. Below is the official description of the film:

The Deadwood film follows the indelible characters of the series, who are reunited after ten years to celebrate South Dakota’s statehood. Former rivalries are reignited, alliances are tested and old wounds are reopened, as all are left to navigate the inevitable changes that modernity and time have wrought.

And below is the teaser trailer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAcftIUE6MQ

Deadwood: The Movie airs on HBO on May 31.

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Watch: Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood Gets Teaser Trailer

When it rains, it pours.

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Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
Photo: Columbia Pictures

When it rains, it pours. Four days after Quentin Tarantino once more laid into John Ford in a piece written for his Beverly Cinema website that saw the filmmaker referring to Ford’s She Wore a Yellow Ribbon as Tie a Yellow Ribbon, and two days after Columbia Pictures released poster art for QT’s ninth feature that wasn’t exactly of the highest order, the studio has released a teaser for Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. The film was announced early last year, with Tarantino describing it as “a story that takes place in Los Angeles in 1969, at the height of hippy Hollywood.”

Set on the eve of the Manson family murders, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood tells the story of TV actor Rick Dalton (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his stunt double, Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt), as they try to get involved in the film industry. The film also stars Margot Robbie (as Sharon Tate), Al Pacino, the late Luke Perry, Damian Lewis, Dakota Fanning, Emile Hirsch, Timothy Olyphant, Kurt Russell, and Bruce Dern in a part originally intended for the late Burt Reynolds.

See the teaser below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Scf8nIJCvs4

Columbia Pictures will release Once Upon a Time in Hollywood on July 26.

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Watch the Stranger Things 3 Trailer, and to the Tune of Mötley Crüe and the Who

A wise woman once said that there’s no such thing as a coincidence.

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Stranger Things 3
Photo: Netflix

A wise woman once said that there’s no such thing as a coincidence. On Friday, Jeff Tremaine’s The Dirt, a biopic about Mötley Crüe’s rise to fame, drops on Netflix. Today, the streaming service has released the trailer for the third season of Stranger Things. The clip opens with the strains of Mötley Crüe’s “Home Sweet Home,” all the better to underline that the peace and quiet that returned to the fictional rural town of Hawkins, Indiana at the end of the show’s second season is just waiting to be upset again.

Little is known about the plot of the new season, and the trailer keeps things pretty vague, though the Duffer Brothers have suggested that the storyline will take place a year after the events of the last season—duh, we know when “Home Sweet Home” came out—and focus on the main characters’ puberty pangs. That said, according to Reddit sleuths who’ve obsessed over such details as the nuances of the new season’s poster art, it looks like Max and company are going to have to contend with demon rats no doubt released from the Upside Down.

See below for the new season’s trailer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEG3bmU_WaI

Stranger Things 3 premieres globally on July 4.

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