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Links for the Day: The Dissolve Talks to Animals, Dennis Lim Cannes Get Enough, Wilde’s World of Journalism, Richard Brody on Edge of Tomorrow, & More

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Links for the Day: The Dissolve Talks to Animals, Dennis Lim Cannes Get Enough, Wilde’s World of Journalism, Richard Brody on Edge of Tomorrow, & More

1. “Talk to the Animals.” In his latest Laser Age column, Keith Phipps on human/animal relationship.

“It’s a final misogynistic twist in a tale dripping with misogyny, one that prompted science-fiction writer and critic Joanna Russ to write a lengthy evisceration whose opening paragraph declared, ’I proclaim publicly right here that sending a woman to see A Boy And His Dog is like sending a Jew to a movie that glorifies Dachau.’ It’s also self-aware enough to suggest irony has been hardwired into it, though this interpretation might be overly kind. (The film’s awful final line, which Ellison hated, to say nothing of the contrast between Ellison’s typically sharp writing and Jones’ relatively pedestrian direction, makes it a little easier to read it this way in the source material.) Vic leaves a surface world in which women have become an endangered species, and joins an underground world made to resemble an idealized—and deeply patriarchal—American past. Both worlds are, in their own way, awful, and both are awful places to be a woman. Not that the dim-bulb Vic gives much thought to such issues. He begins the film as an unrepentant rapist. He ends it by feeding the first woman to awaken tender thoughts in him to his dog, locking him forever in a post-apocalyptic nightmare version of the boy’s-own-adventure tale suggested by the title. Blood isn’t Vic’s Jiminy Cricket, he’s a shaggy Tinkerbell. The boy will never grow up.”

2. “Bergdahl Is Said to Have History of Leaving Post.” The plot thickens.

“A classified military report detailing the Army’s investigation into the disappearance of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl in June 2009 says that he had wandered away from assigned areas before—both at a training range in California and at his remote outpost in Afghanistan—and then returned, according to people briefed on it. The roughly 35-page report, completed two months after Sergeant Bergdahl left his unit, concludes that he most likely walked away of his own free will from his outpost in the dark of night, and it criticized lax security practices and poor discipline in his unit. But it stops short of concluding that there is solid evidence that Sergeant Bergdahl, then a private, intended to permanently desert. Whether Sergeant Bergdahl was a deserter who never intended to come back, or simply slipped away for a short adventure amid an environment of lax security and discipline and was then captured, is one of many unanswered questions about his disappearance.”

3. “Cannes Get Enough.” Dennis Lim wraps up his time on the Croisette.

“Forty-six years after he and his comrades stormed the stage at the Cannes Film Festival to shut down the event in solidarity with the workers and students on the barricades, Jean-Luc Godard, now eighty-three, proved that he still has what it takes to stop this circus in its tracks. For those who came here for the films—as opposed to the conspicuous consumption and permanent hangover of this Hollywood-meets-Eurotrash spring break, with its socialite yacht parties, billionaire charity auctions, and luxury-brand pageantry—the single official screening of Godard’s 3-D opus, Goodbye to Language, was easily this year’s defining event. Lines started forming nearly two hours before the film (which runs all of seventy minutes) and the lights in the Grand Théâtre Lumiere went down to a spontaneous yell of ’Godard forever!’ and rowdy cheers. Less a culmination of the polyphonic mode that is Late Godard than an acceleration, the film is a furiously associative meditation on humanity and history, cinematic and linguistic meaning, the world of nature and the nature of reality—all refracted through fragmentary episodes involving an adulterous couple and dog’s-eye-view roamings through a light-streaked forest. The stereoscopic tricks and compositions are at minimum witty; at their most startling, they renew the reality of the screen image. It’s a bravura display of what a master formalist can do with a technology that cinema, now more than ever, equates simply with spectacle.”

4. “Wilde’s world of journalism.” Stefano Evangelista on the ongoing Complete Works of Oscar Wilde.

“Some interests stand out clearly, though. First of all, fashion. Together with his wife Constance, Wilde was a promoter of what the Victorians called ’rational dress’: he campaigned for a looser and more comfortable style of clothing that would liberate women from corseting and tight-lacing. He thought that, instead of shoes, women should wear clogs (perhaps inlaid with ivory and pearls) and adopt an updated version of ancient Greek dress over a ’substratum’ of sensible modern German underwear, which would help to ward off the chills of the English climate. Wilde took clothing very seriously—if seriousness is a register that made any sense to him at all. He thought that dress should be regarded as a form of applied art, which brought the realm of the aesthetic out of museums and galleries and into everyday life.”

Video of the Day: The video for Europa Europa and the Knife’s “För Alla Namn Vi Inte Får Använda”:

5. “A Spoiler-filled review of Edge of Tomorrow.” Richard Brody on the new Tom Crusie tent pole.

Edge of Tomorrow conveys its ingenious, historically resonant premise but never develops it. The narrative is high-concept gimmickry realized with efficiency and energy but not much imagination. The engineering of the intricate story, and the deft dovetailing needed to iterate multiple lives in rapid succession, seem to have taxed Liman’s art, as does the effort to simulate chemistry between Cruise and Blunt. She’s an active and alert performer who, throughout, seems to want more—a character with a life story to sink her interpretive teeth into—whereas Cruise takes Cage’s one-note backstory, the cowardly out-of-work ad man, and expands it, and himself, to the breaking point. Cruise’s eternal sheen of callow youth is integrated into the very substance of the film. As Cage is converted by circumstances into a hardened and capable fighting machine (veering toward superhero territory), the story tracks his dramatic transformation, in under two hours, from a raw trainee into a military hero. Edge of Tomorrow turns out to be the movie that Cage was ordered to make: his greatest recruiting film.”

Links for the Day: A collection of links to items that we hope will spark discussion. We encourage our readers to submit candidates for consideration to ed@slantmagazine.com and to converse in the comments section.

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Watch: The Long-Awaited Deadwood Movie Gets Teaser Trailer and Premiere Date

Welcome to fucking Deadwood!

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Deadwood
Photo: HBO

At long last, we’re finally going to see more of Deadwood. Very soon after the HBO series’s cancellation in 2006, creator David Milch announced that he agreed to produce a pair of two-hour films to tie up the loose ends left after the third season. It’s been a long road since, and after many false starts over the years, production on one standalone film started in fall 2018. And today we have a glorious teaser for the film, which releases on HBO on May 31. Below is the official description of the film:

The Deadwood film follows the indelible characters of the series, who are reunited after ten years to celebrate South Dakota’s statehood. Former rivalries are reignited, alliances are tested and old wounds are reopened, as all are left to navigate the inevitable changes that modernity and time have wrought.

And below is the teaser trailer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAcftIUE6MQ

Deadwood: The Movie airs on HBO on May 31.

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Watch: Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood Gets Teaser Trailer

When it rains, it pours.

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Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
Photo: Columbia Pictures

When it rains, it pours. Four days after Quentin Tarantino once more laid into John Ford in a piece written for his Beverly Cinema website that saw the filmmaker referring to Ford’s She Wore a Yellow Ribbon as Tie a Yellow Ribbon, and two days after Columbia Pictures released poster art for QT’s ninth feature that wasn’t exactly of the highest order, the studio has released a teaser for Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. The film was announced early last year, with Tarantino describing it as “a story that takes place in Los Angeles in 1969, at the height of hippy Hollywood.”

Set on the eve of the Manson family murders, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood tells the story of TV actor Rick Dalton (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his stunt double, Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt), as they try to get involved in the film industry. The film also stars Margot Robbie (as Sharon Tate), Al Pacino, the late Luke Perry, Damian Lewis, Dakota Fanning, Emile Hirsch, Timothy Olyphant, Kurt Russell, and Bruce Dern in a part originally intended for the late Burt Reynolds.

See the teaser below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Scf8nIJCvs4

Columbia Pictures will release Once Upon a Time in Hollywood on July 26.

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Watch the Stranger Things 3 Trailer, and to the Tune of Mötley Crüe and the Who

A wise woman once said that there’s no such thing as a coincidence.

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Stranger Things 3
Photo: Netflix

A wise woman once said that there’s no such thing as a coincidence. On Friday, Jeff Tremaine’s The Dirt, a biopic about Mötley Crüe’s rise to fame, drops on Netflix. Today, the streaming service has released the trailer for the third season of Stranger Things. The clip opens with the strains of Mötley Crüe’s “Home Sweet Home,” all the better to underline that the peace and quiet that returned to the fictional rural town of Hawkins, Indiana at the end of the show’s second season is just waiting to be upset again.

Little is known about the plot of the new season, and the trailer keeps things pretty vague, though the Duffer Brothers have suggested that the storyline will take place a year after the events of the last season—duh, we know when “Home Sweet Home” came out—and focus on the main characters’ puberty pangs. That said, according to Reddit sleuths who’ve obsessed over such details as the nuances of the new season’s poster art, it looks like Max and company are going to have to contend with demon rats no doubt released from the Upside Down.

See below for the new season’s trailer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEG3bmU_WaI

Stranger Things 3 premieres globally on July 4.

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