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Links for the Day: SCOTUS Makes Same-Sex Marriage a Right Nationwide, The Confederacy’s Final Retreat, The Truth About TV’s Rape Obsession, & More

SCOTUS Legalizes Gay Marriage Nationwide, The Confederacy’s Final Retreat, The Truth About TV’s Rape Obsession, & More.

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Links for the Day: SCOTUS Legalizes Gay Marriage, The Confederacy’s Final Retreat, The Truth About TV’s Rape Obsession, & More

1. “Supreme Court Ruling Makes Same-Sex Marriage a Right Nationwide.” In a long-sought victory for the gay rights movement, the court ruled, 5-4, that the Constitution guarantees a right to same-sex marriage

“’No longer may this liberty be denied,’ Justice Anthony M. Kennedy wrote for the majority in the historic decision. ’No union is more profound than marriage, for it embodies the highest ideals of love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice and family. In forming a marital union, two people become something greater than once they were.’ Marriage is a ’keystone of our social order,’ Justice Kennedy said, adding that the plaintiffs in the case were seeking ’equal dignity in the eyes of the law.’ The decision, which was the culmination of decades of litigation and activism, set off jubilation and tearful embraces across the country, the first same-sex marriages in several states, and resistance—or at least stalling—in others. It came against the backdrop of fast-moving changes in public opinion, with polls indicating that most Americans now approve of the unions.”

2. “The Confederacy’s Final Retreat.” Jelani Cobb on one of the South’s last battles.

“I some future footnote or parenthetical aside, it may be observed that although General Robert E. Lee surrendered in 1865, the Confederacy’s final retreat did not occur until a century and a half later. The rearguard movement of Republicans in the aftermath of the slaughter in Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church marked the relinquishing of the Confederacy’s best-fortified positions: the cultural ones. We have for decades willfully coexisted with a translucent lie about the bloodiest conflict in American history and the moral questions at its center. Amid the calls last week to lower the Confederate battle flag at the state capitol, the defenders of the flag averred that it represents ’heritage, not hate.’ The great sleight of hand is the notion that these things were mutually exclusive.”

3. “The truth about TV’s rape obsession: How we struggle with the broken myths of masculinity, on screen and off.” From soaps to prestige drama, it’s the theater through which both men and women grapple with maleness and power.

“When it comes to the history of rape on television, it boils down to two basic categories: TV meant for men, and TV meant for women. Primetime, network television was for male audiences (or a mixed-gender audience, which then, as now, defaults to appealing to men). Soap operas, TV movies, and niche cable channels appealed to women. The era between the ‘70s, when the rape reform movement was at its height, and the ‘90s, when the ’golden age of television’ began to take over, offers up an awful lot of one-off episodes about rape on primetime where a male protagonist encounters a female sexual assault victim and is heroic about it. The heroism was typically accomplished by both not raping and by avenging rape, through safely masculine methods like beating the crap out of a guy, arresting them, or killing them quietly.”

4. Tangerine and the Cinema of Sean Baker.’” Adam Cook on how Sean Baker’s generous cinema maps human geography.

“The madness, commotion and even life-ruining drama here somehow is bent to the tune of comedy, and there’s something endearing in this chaotic donut shop melting pot of gender blending and family disruption, maybe because it somehow feels inclusive of so-called ’deviant’ lifestyle choices. Most importantly, the funny doesn’t come from pointing and laughing at the eccentric cast of characters, but from looking at the world through their eyes. More than anything, they’re fun to spend time with. The film begins and ends with Sin-Dee and Alexandra. A secret revealed towards the conclusion comes between them but doesn’t break them apart. A moment of humiliation for Sin-Dee leads to their reconciliation, as Alexandra comforts her in solidarity, and the film’s cartoonishness dissolves in the mundane setting of a Laundromat, where a final gesture between these characters carries the weight of the world.”

5. “The Status of Love in the Age of Consumerism.” Amir Ganjavie interviews Jia Zhang-ke

“In life you have moments when unexpected things and accidents happen; those are times when you really start to rethink your life and love. The plane crash, or the reference to the Malaysian airliner, is to bring out that unexpected aspect of accidents in life and how that would change the way you think about your relationships, love, and emotions. When I was back home when I was growing up I had a lot of friends whose parents were aviators in the air force at the nearby base. Every year I would hear stories about my classmates losing their fathers because of accidents while they were flying. So to me unexpected accidents happen all the time and they make us think about relationships and love on a completely different level. I didn’t really spend a lot of time explaining the accident scenes in [Mountains May Depart] because just like accidents themselves they come and they go unexpectedly; sometimes you remember them and sometimes you don’t.”

Video of the Day: Legend trailer asks us to ponder whether two Tom Hardys are better than one:

Links for the Day: A collection of links to items that we hope will spark discussion. We encourage our readers to submit candidates for consideration to ed@slantmagazine.com and to converse in the comments section.

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Watch: Two Episode Trailers for Jordan Peele’s The Twilight Zone Reboot

Ahead of next week’s premiere of the series, CBS All Access has released trailers for the first two episodes.

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The Twilight Zone
Photo: CBS All Access

Jordan Peele is sitting on top of the world—or, at least, at the top of the box office, with his sophomore film, Us, having delivered (and then some) on the promise of his Get Out. Next up for the filmmaker is the much-anticipated reboot of Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone, which the filmmaker executive produced and hosts. Ahead of next week’s premiere of the series, CBS All Access has released trailers for the first two episodes, “The Comedian” and “Nightmare at 30,000 Feet.” In the former, Kumail Nanjiani stars as the eponymous comedian, who agonizingly wrestles with how far he will go for a laugh. And in the other, a spin on the classic “Nightmare at 20,0000 Feet” episode of the original series starring William Shatner, Adam Scott plays a man locked in a battle with his paranoid psyche. Watch both trailers below:

The Twilight Zone premieres on April 1.

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Scott Walker Dead at 76

Walker’s solo work moved away from the pop leanings of the Walker Brothers and increasingly toward the avant-garde.

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Scott Walker
Photo: 4AD

American-born British singer-songwriter, composer, and record producer Scott Walker, who began his career as a 1950s-style chanteur in an old-fashioned vocal trio, has died at 76. In a statement from his label 4AD, the musician, born Noel Scott Engel, is celebrated for having “enriched the lives of thousands, first as one third of the Walker Brothers, and later as a solo artist, producer and composer of uncompromising originality.”

Walker was born in Hamilton, Ohio on January 9, 1943 and earned his reputation very early on for his distinctive baritone. He changed his name after joining the Walker Brothers in the early 1960s, during which time the pop group enjoyed much success with such number one chart hits as “Make It Easy on Yourself” and “The Sun Ain’t Gonna Shine (Anymore).”

The reclusive Walker’s solo work moved away from the pop leanings of the Walker Brothers and increasingly toward the avant-garde. Walker, who was making music until his death, received much critical acclaim with 2006’s Drift and 2012’s Bish Bosch, as well as with 2014’s Soused, his collaboration with Sunn O))). He also produced the soundtrack to Leos Carax’s 1999 romantic drama Pola X and composed the scores for Brady Corbet’s first two films as a director, 2016’s The Childhood of a Leader and last year’s Vox Lux.

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Watch: The Long-Awaited Deadwood Movie Gets Teaser Trailer and Premiere Date

Welcome to fucking Deadwood!

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Deadwood
Photo: HBO

At long last, we’re finally going to see more of Deadwood. Very soon after the HBO series’s cancellation in 2006, creator David Milch announced that he agreed to produce a pair of two-hour films to tie up the loose ends left after the third season. It’s been a long road since, and after many false starts over the years, production on one standalone film started in fall 2018. And today we have a glorious teaser for the film, which releases on HBO on May 31. Below is the official description of the film:

The Deadwood film follows the indelible characters of the series, who are reunited after ten years to celebrate South Dakota’s statehood. Former rivalries are reignited, alliances are tested and old wounds are reopened, as all are left to navigate the inevitable changes that modernity and time have wrought.

And below is the teaser trailer:

Deadwood: The Movie airs on HBO on May 31.

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