Connect with us

Blog

Links for the Day: Jennifer Lawrence Interviews Eddie Redmayne, Michael Mann Remembers Edgar Froese, Dana Stevens Tumbles Into the Screen, & More

Published

on

Links for the Day: Jennifer Lawrence Interviews Eddie Redmayne, Michael Mann Remembers Edgar Froese, Dana Stevens Tumbles Into the Screen, & More

1. “Eddie Redmayne.” Jennifer Lawrence interviews the star of The Theory of Everything.

“I had these three images in my trailer—one was Einstein with his tongue out, another was James Dean, because Stephen is just effortlessly cool. He has this kind of shambolic confidence to him. And the last one was a joker in a pack of cards, a marionette with a puppet, because when you meet Stephen—I describe it as a ’Lord of Misrule’ quality—he’s got a great sense of mischief. I worked with a dancer as well, an amazing woman called Alex Reynolds. My instinct was to try to learn the different stages of the physicality like a dance. Like learning steps, you never have a hold of it—I’m a shit dancer by the way—but once you know the steps, you can then play.”

2. “Michael Mann Mourns Collaborator Edgar Froese of Tangerine Dream.” The legendary director shares his memories of joining Tangerine Dream in their Berlin studio to craft the soundtrack to his first film Thief.

“The score was adventurous with some real voyages of discovery. Working with analog sequencers and synthesizers we were also processing sound effects, which I had brought in a suitcase on mag, so that ocean waves might crash in G Major, the same key as the cue. It was a wonderful artistic collaboration. Thinking back to what was at the time cutting edge technology but so primitive now, it was more fun. They were innovating processes and re-combining components to do stuff on frontiers that Moog never envisioned, as new ideas showed up.”

3. “Tumbling Into the Screen.” Dana Stevens on how watching movies with her daughter changed the way she thought about film.

“Our current public discourse about children and filmed entertainment—the debates about the proper doling out of ’screen time’ at different ages, etc.—starts from the assumption that they naturally occupy this larval position, and that it’s our job as—the adult insects? Bleh—to feed them the proper balance of audiovisual royal jelly so they can transform into viewers like us. But participating in P.’s improvisatory way of watching is the very opposite of self-erasure. The 4½-foot tall poststructuralist philosopher I live with demonstrates a radical mode of viewership daily. Because of her, and with her, I am able—by moments—to move out of my own natural larval state and experience movies not just as deliverers of entertainment, conveyors of meaning, or objects of aesthetic contemplation, but as pure fields of emotional and sensory intensity, almost like rooms to which one can return.”

4. “Sundance Diary, Day 5: Shut-ins, Gamblers, and Greta Gerwig.” Wesley Morris’s second dispatch from the festival.

“God bless Noah Baumbach. He’s fallen so deeply under Greta Gerwig’s spell that he can’t see straight anymore. The energy of his movies has always been European and the acidic sensibility distinctly American. With Gerwig, he’s found whimsy. The two movies they have written together and she has starred in—Frances Ha and Mistress America, which premiered here a couple of days ago and will be released by Fox Searchlight—have an eventually endearing unruliness. I’d say they’re unfocused, but the focus is her and her selfish, aloof persona and odd sense of timing.”

5. “Left Behind.” For Reverse Shot, Michael Sicinski on Hard to Be a God.

“The manner in which German depicts this world is, of course, thoroughly hideous, and Hard to Be a God’s unremitting three-hour tour makes for a pungent yet oddly cleansing viewing experience. This is as tactile and visceral as cinema gets, and at the same time our cognitive faculties are stretched like taffy, struggling to connect one peasant to another or suss out which warring faction is which. One imagines that Theodor Adorno, never the latitudinarian where art and especially cinema were concerned, might have approved of German’s 180-minute Rabelaisian acid test. But German’s achievement lies less in his creation of a fetid faux-medieval blunderland than in how he encourages us to see and even participate in it.”

Video of the Day: Richard Brody on Daughters of the Dust:

Links for the Day: A collection of links to items that we hope will spark discussion. We encourage our readers to submit candidates for consideration to ed@slantmagazine.com and to converse in the comments section.

Advertisement
Comments

Blog

Let Your Sanity Go on Vacation with a Trip to the Moons of Madness

If you dare, ascend into the horrors of the Martian mind and check out the trailer for yourself.

Published

on

Moons of Madness
Photo: Rock Pocket Games

The announcement trailer for Moons of Madness opens with an empty shot of the Invictus, a research installation that’s been established on Mars. The camera lingers over well-lit but equally abandoned corridors, drifting over a picture of a family left millions of kilometers behind on Earth before finally settling on the first-person perspective of Shane Newehart, an engineer working for the Orochi Group. Fans of a different Funcom series, The Secret World, will instantly know that something’s wrong. And sure enough, in what may be the understatement of the year, Newehart is soon talking about how he “seems to have a situation here”—you know, what with all the antiquated Gothic hallways, glitching cameras, and tentacled creatures that start appearing before him.

As with Dead Space, it’s not long before the station is running on emergency power, with eerie whispers echoing through the station and bloody, cryptic symbols being scrawled on the walls. Did we mention tentacles? Though the gameplay hasn’t officially been revealed, this brief teaser suggests that players will have to find ways both to survive the physical pressures of this lifeless planet and all sorts of sanity-challenging supernatural occurrences, with at least a soupçon of H.P. Lovecraft’s cosmicism thrown in for good measure.

If you dare, ascend into the horrors of the Martian mind and check out the trailer for yourself.

Rock Pocket Games will release Moons of Madness later this year.

Continue Reading

Blog

Watch: Two Episode Trailers for Jordan Peele’s The Twilight Zone Reboot

Ahead of next week’s premiere of the series, CBS All Access has released trailers for the first two episodes.

Published

on

The Twilight Zone
Photo: CBS All Access

Jordan Peele is sitting on top of the world—or, at least, at the top of the box office, with his sophomore film, Us, having delivered (and then some) on the promise of his Get Out. Next up for the filmmaker is the much-anticipated reboot of Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone, which the filmmaker executive produced and hosts. Ahead of next week’s premiere of the series, CBS All Access has released trailers for the first two episodes, “The Comedian” and “Nightmare at 30,000 Feet.” In the former, Kumail Nanjiani stars as the eponymous comedian, who agonizingly wrestles with how far he will go for a laugh. And in the other, a spin on the classic “Nightmare at 20,0000 Feet” episode of the original series starring William Shatner, Adam Scott plays a man locked in a battle with his paranoid psyche. Watch both trailers below:

The Twilight Zone premieres on April 1.

Continue Reading

Blog

Scott Walker Dead at 76

Walker’s solo work moved away from the pop leanings of the Walker Brothers and increasingly toward the avant-garde.

Published

on

Scott Walker
Photo: 4AD

American-born British singer-songwriter, composer, and record producer Scott Walker, who began his career as a 1950s-style chanteur in an old-fashioned vocal trio, has died at 76. In a statement from his label 4AD, the musician, born Noel Scott Engel, is celebrated for having “enriched the lives of thousands, first as one third of the Walker Brothers, and later as a solo artist, producer and composer of uncompromising originality.”

Walker was born in Hamilton, Ohio on January 9, 1943 and earned his reputation very early on for his distinctive baritone. He changed his name after joining the Walker Brothers in the early 1960s, during which time the pop group enjoyed much success with such number one chart hits as “Make It Easy on Yourself” and “The Sun Ain’t Gonna Shine (Anymore).”

The reclusive Walker’s solo work moved away from the pop leanings of the Walker Brothers and increasingly toward the avant-garde. Walker, who was making music until his death, received much critical acclaim with 2006’s Drift and 2012’s Bish Bosch, as well as with 2014’s Soused, his collaboration with Sunn O))). He also produced the soundtrack to Leos Carax’s 1999 romantic drama Pola X and composed the scores for Brady Corbet’s first two films as a director, 2016’s The Childhood of a Leader and last year’s Vox Lux.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Donate

Slant is reaching more readers than ever, but as online advertising continues to evolve, independently operated publications like ours have struggled to adapt. We're committed to keeping our content free and accessible—meaning no paywalls or subscription fees—so if you like what we do, please consider becoming a Slant patron:

Patreon

You can also make a donation via PayPal.

Giveaways

Advertisement

Newsletter

Advertisement

Preview

Trending