Katy Perry’s “Bon Appétit” Serves Up Food Porn for the Masses

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Katy Perry’s “Bon Appétit” Serves Up Food Porn for the Masses

Rony Alwin

Katy Perry’s “Bon Appétit” Serves Up Food Porn for the Masses

Katy Perry's “Chained to the Rhythm” sounded like an early candidate for song of the summer, but the singer was apparently just warming up. Perhaps in part because “Chained to the Rhythm” burned slower than Perry's past lead singles, “Bon Appétit,” the second release from her upcoming album, is a decided shift away from the so-called “purposeful pop” of its predecessor, and she's traded disco-ball scavenger hunts for pie recipe swapping. No soft political polemics here, just time-tested food-as-sex metaphors that hit like a meat tenderizer: “All that you can have, boy/Got me spread like a buffet…Appetite for seduction, fresh out the oven,” Perry sings over a percolating synth beat.

Tribeca Film Festival Aardvark and The Clapper

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Tribeca Film Festival: Aardvark and The Clapper

Tribeca Film Festival

Tribeca Film Festival: Aardvark and The Clapper

Brian Shoaf's Aardvark opens in the most on-the-nose way imaginable: with a shot of—what else?—an aardvark that young Josh Norman (Jack Lanyo) is watching with particular interest as it burrows its way into its hole at a zoo. Such obviousness marks the film as a whole, right down to the grotesque chili-bowl haircut that the now-grown-up Josh (Zachary Quinto) sports to immediately signal to us that we're watching a mentally disturbed individual.

Tribeca Film Festival Review City of Ghosts

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Tribeca Film Festival Review: City of Ghosts

Tribeca Film Festival

Tribeca Film Festival Review: City of Ghosts

Matthew Heineman's City of Ghosts is a tribute to the bravery of Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently (RBSS), a collective of Syrian citizen journalists who banded together in 2014 to chronicle the atrocities being committed by ISIS in their country. In fact, the documentary begins with footage of members of the group about to accept the International Press Freedom Award in New York, which gives the viewer an indication of the filmmaker's admiring view of the group. But Heineman isn't just interested in hero worship.

The Americans Recap Season 5, Episode 8, "Immersion"

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The Americans Recap: Season 5, Episode 8, "Immersion"

Jeffrey Neira/FX

The Americans Recap: Season 5, Episode 8, "Immersion"

Another week, another episode of The Americans that's notable for its pervasive lack of hurry. Philip (Matthew Rhys) slowly drives home from his meeting with Gabriel, the camera hanging back to give us one of the widest-ever views to date of the exterior of the Jennings home, and fills Elizabeth (Keri Russell) in about their now-former handler's thoughts on Renee and Paige (Holly Taylor). They speak of Gabriel almost as if he's a ghost, and with an understanding that they will one day become every bit as haunted as he was when he walked out of the safe house for what was probably the last time. Unsurprisingly, then, they put up walls when they go to meet Claudia (Margo Martindale) and discuss their latest plan of attack, because to stave off a human connection with their new handler is to stand back from that precipice of moral oblivion they've been inching toward for so long.

Tribeca Film Festival Thirst Street

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Tribeca Film Festival: Thirst Street

Tribeca Film Festival

Tribeca Film Festival: Thirst Street

Nathan Silver tackles melodrama in Thirst Street, fusing its emotional bigness with his unique form of quotidian portraiture without one cancelling the other out. Silver takes one of the most politically disreputable of subgenres—the film in which a female stalks a male, embodying each person's respective, stereotypical fears of rejection and obsession—and turns it upside down, stretching it so that we understand the stakes driving all parties. Paradoxically, the film is so empathetic that one doesn't know where to place their empathy, and Silver's mastery of tone recalls other filmmakers who've mixed tragedy and comedy to unmooring, exhilaratingly ambiguous ends, such as Alan Rudolph, Pedro Almodóvar, and Claude Chabrol.

Silicon Valley Recap Season 4, Episode 1, "Success Failure"

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Silicon Valley Recap: Season 4, Episode 1, "Success Failure"

John P. Johnson

Silicon Valley Recap: Season 4, Episode 1, "Success Failure"

Richard (Thomas Middleditch) bumbles his way to an unlikely victory at the start of the season premiere of Silicon Valley, posing as an Uber driver in the latest chapter of Pied Piper's comically inept struggle to survive. The nerdily awkward pitch Richard initiates to the venture capitalist in his back seat, video-conferencing with the rest of the Pied Piper team to show off the unexpectedly popular platform they've created more or less by accident, doubles as a reunion for the show's viewers, bringing the main characters together in all their dysfunctional glory.

Tribeca Film Festival Review Flames

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Tribeca Film Festival Review: Flames

Tribeca Film Festival

Tribeca Film Festival Review: Flames

Early in Flames, we see the film's co-writers, co-editors, co-directors, and co-stars, Zefrey Throwell and Josephine Decker, in the first of many compromising positions. Decker's hanging off a bed upside down and naked, while Throwell, standing right-side up, has comically unglamorous sex with her, his pumping ass facing the camera while they both laugh. We're seeing a real side of sex that Joe Swanberg explored in his early films but that's not often acknowledged by cinema (which usually offers erotic and romantic titillation that's self-seriously sanitized): its potentialities as a hang-out activity, when one's grown so comfortable with a partner that self-consciousness eases and pleasure deepens. Knowledge that one doesn't have to elicit an orgasm per minute from their partner is freedom—a step toward lovers allowing themselves to be human in one another's company.

Tribeca Film Festival Review The Departure

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Tribeca Film Festival Review: The Departure

Tribeca Film Festival

Tribeca Film Festival Review: The Departure

Death hangs over The Departure in grandly cosmic fashion. Lana Wilson's documentary is a portrait of Ittetsu Nemoto, a Buddhist priest in Japan who's devoted his life to preparing people for death and trying to talk people out of taking their own lives. The film's opening sequence captures in detail one of Nemoto's workshops, in which, among other things, he has his followers write down on small pieces of paper various things they feel they can't live without, and then proceed, in stages, to crumple most of them up and throw them away. This establishes not only the film's thoughtful approach to death, but also its calm aesthetic, with its long takes and wide shots inducing a sense of serene reflection wholly appropriate to its eternal subject matter.

Tribeca Film Festival Review The Family I Had

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Tribeca Film Festival Review: The Family I Had

Tribeca Film Festival

Tribeca Film Festival Review: The Family I Had

Charity Lee occupies the center of one of those true-crime stories that's so operatically atrocious it's impossible to comprehend. In 2007, Charity's 13-year-old son, Paris, savagely murdered her four-year-old daughter and his half-sister, Ella, strangling and beating the girl, stabbing her 17 times with a kitchen knife. Katie Green and Carlye Rubin's documentary The Family I Had opens with Charity's recollection of hearing of Ella's death, which is initially presented as a terrifyingly arbitrary incident. We hear the recording of Paris's call to 911, in which he sounds remorseful and panicked, as if he's snapped out of a slumber and is describing an act committed by another person.

Tribeca Film Festival Review Dog Years

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Tribeca Film Festival Review: Dog Years

Tribeca Film Festival

Tribeca Film Festival Review: Dog Years

It's unseemly watching Burt Reynolds, one of the greatest movie stars, beg for sympathy in Adam Rifkin's Dog Years. The film bears a resemblance to Daniel Noah's Max Rose, as both are vehicles for their stars to explore their own legacies within a thinly fictional framework. But in Max Rose, Jerry Lewis had the sense not to overtly soften his character's crustiness, maintaining his dignity and reminding viewers that he was still a vital actor despite the production's pervading mediocrity. Reynolds still has his characteristic comic-masculine force, and he can still throw a line away with masterful panache, but he allows Rifkin to enable his self-pity.